Equity and diversity in Open Access. National and regional OA publishing platforms Webinar

This SPARC Europe’s webinar brought together voices from Croatia, France, Finland, the Netherlands, and Spain. Experts from these countries talked us through their initial influences and motivations for establishing national and regional platforms. They shared their perspectives on building and running national and regional OA publishing platforms and spoke about how they had evolved over time through presentations. A panel discussion touched upon challenges they had encountered and shared the lessons they had learned when joining forces and collaborating. They also talked about their future plans to increase collaboration be this locally or internationally. This webinar focused on the following topics: 1. What community-governed, publicly-funded not-for-profit national and regional OA publishing platforms are already set up in Europe 2. Which opportunities and challenges come with setting up a national or regional OA platform and collaborating with smaller publishers 3. What the best practices for national and regional OA platforms are, as seen by experienced experts in the field

See the slide deck here: https://zenodo.org/record/5776490

Paris Open Science European Conference (OSEC) – French presidency of the European Council

This international conference is being organised with the strong support of the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation, the French Academy of Sciences, the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm), the High Council for Evaluation of Research and Higher Education (Hcéres), the University of Lorraine and the University of Nantes.

FPJ-Ed: Third edition of India-France Knowledge Summit focuses on ‘Open Science’

“November 24, 2021, marked the third edition of the India- France Knowledge Summit (KS3). It was held live online and co-hosted by Savitribai Phule Pune University in partnership with France’s Central National De La Researche Scientifique. Eminent researchers, doctors, and domain experts participated in the three-day summit, which began today.

As the summit, today presented a wide introduction to research, technology, and open science, Mr. Dharmendra Pradhan, The Minister of Education in India, took a moment to share his views….”

Second French Plan for Open Science: Generalising Open Science in France 2021-2024

This Second French Plan extends the scope to include source code from research, structures actions promoting data sharing and openness through the creation of the Recherche Data Gouv platform, it increases the number of transformative levers available to generalise the practice of open science and is divided up into different disciplines and themes. It is firmly attached to a European-wide vision and, in the context of the French presidency of the European Union, proposes to act in favour of open science being effectively taken into account in both individual and collective assessments for research. This involves initiating a process of sustainable transformation in order to ensure that open science becomes a common and shared practice, encouraged by the whole international ecosystem of higher education, research and innovation.

Software for Open Science: a leap forward – Software Heritage

On July 4 2018  the first  French national plan for Open Science identified Software Heritage as a key initiative to support software used and produced in research and led to the creation of the working group dedicated to free and open source software inside the french national committee for Open Science.

Ouvrir la Science – “Data policy” linked to publications: recommendations to journals

The Research Data College has set up a working group on the link between publications and research data. The aim is to contribute to the implementation of the Second Commitment of National Plan For Open Science.

Ouvrir la Science – On the road to opening up research codes

In November 2018, the Committee for Open Science set up a ‘free and open source software group’, or the GPLO for short.

The creation of this group was based on a simple observation – that software is at the core of research and that open source practices are one of the founding elements of open science. The GPLO’s mission is to help the committee support the development of free and open software in scientific communities as such software is considered to be a pillar of open science.

News – Knowledge Exchange Newsletter July 2021 – News – Knowledge Exchange

he July 2021 Knowledge Exchange newsletter is out now!

This newsletter summarises our latest work and updates on new activities since our previous newsletter in December 2020. It includes details on our ongoing work on the Openness Profile as well as early findings from our Publishing Reproducible Research Outputs work and details of scoping a new activity around PID Risks and Trust.

Plan d’action 2022 de l’Agence nationale de la recherche : Évolutions et nouvelle feuille de route pour l’année à venir (National Research Agency 2022 action plan: Developments and new roadmap for the coming year)

From Google’s English: 

“The 2022 Action Plan of the National Research Agency (ANR) is part of the 2021-2030 Research Programming Law (LPR), which consolidates ANR’s missions and strengthens its resources. , and the Plan France relaunch for 2021-2022. ANR’s annual roadmap, the Action Plan describes the actions and calls for projects proposed by the Agency for the coming year, thus giving all scientific communities and all public or private companies involved in French research, general visibility of its funding offer.”

Open Science and the UNESCO initiative – opportunity to republish ISC statement – International Science Council

In this statement made by the ISC delegation to the UNESCO Special Committee meeting on Open Science, 6-12 May 2021, the delegation explores how the recommendation and potential cascading interventions by Member States could develop along two divergent pathways

Ouvrir la Science – Deuxième Plan national pour la science ouverte

From Google’s English:  “The National Open Science Plan announced in 2018 by the Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation, Frédérique Vidal, has enabled France to adopt a coherent and dynamic policy in the field of open science, coordinated by the Committee for Open Science, which brings together the ministry, research and higher education institutions and the scientific community. After three years of implementation, the progress made is notable. The rate of French scientific publications in open access rose from 41% to 56%. The National Open Science Fund was created, it launched two calls for projects in favor of open scientific publication and it supported structuring international initiatives. The National Research Agency and other funding agencies now require open access to publications and the drafting of data management plans for the projects they fund. The function of ministerial research data administrator has been created and a network is being deployed in the establishments. About twenty universities and research organizations have adopted an open science policy. Several guides and recommendations for putting open science into practice have been published. About twenty universities and research organizations have adopted an open science policy. Several guides and recommendations for putting open science into practice have been published. About twenty universities and research organizations have adopted an open science policy. Several guides and recommendations for putting open science into practice have been published.

The steps already taken and the evolution of the international context invite us to extend, renew and strengthen our commitments by adopting a second National Plan for Open Science, the effects of which will be deployed until 2024. With this new plan, France is continuing the ambitious trajectory initiated by the law for a digital republic of 2016 and confirmed by the research programming law of 2020, which includes open science in the missions of researchers and teacher-researchers.

This second National Plan extends its scope to source codes resulting from research, it structures actions in favor of the opening or sharing of data through the creation of the Research Data Gouv platform, it multiplies the levers of transformation in order to generalize open science practices and it presents disciplinary and thematic variations. It is firmly in line with a European ambition and proposes, within the framework of the French Presidency of the European Union, to act to take effective account of open science practices in individual and collective research evaluations. It is about initiating a process of sustainable transformation in order to make open science a common and shared practice…”

ODECO – Towards a sustainable Open Data ECOsystem

“ODECO is a 4-year Horizon 2020 Marie Sk?odowska-Curie Innovative Training Network initiative (H2020-MSCA-ITN-2020, grant agreement 955569). The central aim of the ODECO consortium network is to train the next generation of creative and innovative early stage open data researchers, to unlock their creative and innovative potential to address current and future challenges in the creation of user driven, circular and inclusive open data ecosystem.

The programme runs between October 2021 and September 2025 and will deliver 15 PhD degrees, in joint supervision and training between the public and private sectors.”

Fully funded PhD Position in Paris on Open Data Licensing | EURAXESS

“This fully funded PhD position is part of the EU Horizon 2020 Marie Sklodowska Curie ITN project entitled “ODECO: Towards a Sustainable Open Data ECOsystem” (see www.odeco-research.eu). ODECO is a four-year project involving 15 PhD projects covering each a specific part of the open data ecosystem. The central aim of the ODECO consortium network is to train the next generation of creative and innovative early stage open data researchers, to unlock their creative and innovative potential to address current and future challenges in the creation of user driven, circular and inclusive open data ecosystems.

Current developments in the field of open data are characterised as highly fragmented. Open data ecosystems are often developed in different domains in isolation of each other and with little involvement of potential users, resulting in approaches that significantly limit open data reusability for users. This reduces innovation and the ability to create new valued added goods and services. Isolated domains also undermine interoperability for users acting as a barrier to data sharing. Efforts are also uncoordinated in open data training and research, where multidisciplinary approaches are scant….”