[2212.07811] Do altmetric scores reflect article quality? Evidence from the UK Research Excellence Framework 2021

Abstract:  Altmetrics are web-based quantitative impact or attention indicators for academic articles that have been proposed to supplement citation counts. This article reports the first assessment of the extent to which mature altmetrics from this http URL and Mendeley associate with journal article quality. It exploits expert norm-referenced peer review scores from the UK Research Excellence Framework 2021 for 67,030+ journal articles in all fields 2014-17/18, split into 34 Units of Assessment (UoAs). The results show that altmetrics are better indicators of research quality than previously thought, although not as good as raw and field normalised Scopus citation counts. Surprisingly, field normalising citation counts can reduce their strength as a quality indicator for articles in a single field. For most UoAs, Mendeley reader counts are the best, tweet counts are also a relatively strong indicator in many fields, and Facebook, blogs and news citations are moderately strong indicators in some UoAs, at least in the UK. In general, altmetrics are the strongest indicators of research quality in the health and physical sciences and weakest in the arts and humanities. The Altmetric Attention Score, although hybrid, is almost as good as Mendeley reader counts as a quality indicator and reflects more non-scholarly impacts.

 

Early Indicators of Scientific Impact: Predicting Citations with Altmetrics

Abstract:  Identifying important scholarly literature at an early stage is vital to the academic research community and other stakeholders such as technology companies and government bodies. Due to the sheer amount of research published and the growth of ever-changing interdisciplinary areas, researchers need an efficient way to identify important scholarly work. The number of citations a given research publication has accrued has been used for this purpose, but these take time to occur and longer to accumulate. In this article, we use altmetrics to predict the short-term and long-term citations that a scholarly publication could receive. We build various classification and regression models and evaluate their performance, finding neural networks and ensemble models to perform best for these tasks. We also find that Mendeley readership is the most important factor in predicting the early citations, followed by other factors such as the academic status of the readers (e.g., student, postdoc, professor), followers on Twitter, online post length, author count, and the number of mentions on Twitter, Wikipedia, and across different countries.

 

For Mendeley Data winner, sharing FAIR data helps researchers learn from each other

“Vanessa, a Research Fellow in the Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pisa, is a recent winner of the Mendeley Data FAIRest Datasets Award. The award recognizes researchers or research groups that make their research data available for additional research and do so in a way that exemplifies the FAIR Data Principles – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable….”

Elsevier’s Presence on Campuses Spans More Than Journals. That Has Some Scholars Worried. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Lyon, a librarian of scholarly communications at the University of Texas at Austin, listed scholarly-publishing tools that had been acquired by the journal publishing giant Elsevier. In 2013, the company bought Mendeley, a free reference manager. It acquired the Social Science Research Network, an e-library with more than 850,000 papers, in 2016. And it acquired the online tools Pure and Bepress — which visualize research — in 2012 and 2017, respectively.

Lyon said she started considering institutions’ dependence on Elsevier when the company acquired Bepress two years ago. She was shocked, she recalled in a recent interview.

“It just got me thinking,” she said. Elsevier had it all: Institutional repositories, preprints of journal articles, and analytics. “Elsevier, Elsevier, Elsevier, Elsevier, Elsevier.”

Scholars are beginning to discuss the idea of Elsevier-as-monolith at conferences and in their research. Not only are librarians and researchers speaking openly about the hefty costs of bulk subscriptions to the company’s premier journals, but they’re also paying attention to the products that Elsevier has acquired, several of which allow its customers to store data and share their work….”

Mendeley Data: Now Available via OpenAIRE – Mendeley Blog

“OpenAIRE is a network of repositories, archives and journals that support Open Access policies. OpenAIRE is a Horizon 2020 project, aimed at supporting the implementation of EC and ERC Open Access policies; open access to scientific peer reviewed publications is obligatory for all Horizon 2020 funded projects. The goal is to make as much European funded research output as possible, available to all, via the OpenAIRE portal. Every dataset published in Mendeley Data, which has an associated article or project, now becomes automatically aggregated to the OpenAIRE portal, where it can be found alongside other research. This enables researchers to discover research data from a wide range of repositories in one place. This means Mendeley Data is part of a global collaborative discourse promoting open science. With the availability of entire research projects and associated data, data reuse is supported, accelerating the pace of research.”

A “Sneak Peek” at papers under consideration

“[T]his week we’re excited to debut Cell Press Sneak Peek. Simply put, Sneak Peek is a sharing group for papers currently under consideration at Cell Press journals. Authors whose manuscripts have been sent out for peer review will have the option of sharing their submitted manuscript in Sneak Peek using Mendeley. To read and comment on them, all you need is to register for the group on Mendeley….Cell Press’s policy on preprints remains the same. Posting a preprint does not impact consideration at any Cell Press journal, and manuscripts that appear on preprint servers can also be posted on Sneak Peek….”

Elsevier acquires online community SSRN

“STM publisher Elsevier has acquired the largest repository and community for social science and humanities researchers in the world, SSRN, to accelerate its social strategy and scale the network up for the benefit of “the entire scientific ecosystem”.

Elsevier has not disclosed how much it paid for American research preprint repository and online community SSRN, but revealed it will be integrated with Elsevier’s reference management programme Mendeley, broadening its offering and helping researchers to better manage the publication journey from start to finish….”