Should open access lead to closed research? The trends towards paying to perform research

Abstract:  Open  Access  (OA)  emerged  as  an  important  transition  in  scholarly  publishing  worldwide during the past two decades. So far, this transition is increasingly based on article processing charges (APC), which create a new paywall on the researchers’ side. Publishing is part of the research  process  and  thereby  necessary  to  perform  research.  This  study  analyses  the  global trends towards paying to perform research by combing observed trends in publishing from 2015 to 2020 with an APC price list. APC expenses have sharply increased among six countries with different  OA  policies:  the  USA,  China,  the  UK,  France,  the  Netherlands,  and  Norway.  The estimated global revenues from APC among major publishers now exceed 2 billion US dollars annually. Mergers and takeovers show that the industry is moving towards APC-based OA as the more profitable business  model.  Research publishing will be closed  to  those who cannot make an institution or project money payment. Our results lead to a discussion of whether APC is the best way to promote OA.

MOOC: Open Science: Sharing Your Research with the World | TU Delft Online

“You can become a more visible, effective and impactful researcher by sharing your research data and publications openly. In this course, you will learn the objectives, main concepts, and benefits of Open Science principles along with practices for open data management and open data sharing.

Since research increasingly relies on software which is used to model and simulate, and to deal with the ever growing volume of research data, the course will also introduce FAIR software practices.

Citizens participation in research is getting more and more important. The course will demonstrate what citizen science is about, how to stimulate citizens to participate in your research and how to handle (new) responsibilities when implementing citizen science.

You’ll learn to establish links between publications, data, software and methods, how to attach a persistent identifier and metadata to your results, and methods for clarifying usage rights. You will also discover ways to apply these principles to your daily research and adapt existing routines. Finally, you’ll uncover potential barriers to sharing research and discuss possible solutions.

This course will help you grasp the key principles of Open Science, with answers to questions like:

How can researchers effectively store, manage, and share research data?
What kinds of open access publishing are most effective?
How can researchers increase the visibility and impact of their research?
How can the use of social media contribute to the visibility and impact of research?
How can researchers be acknowledged for the research software they write?
How can research benefit from citizen science? …”

New open access policy within Utrecht University | News @ Utrecht University

Utrecht University aims at a publishing climate in which academic authors publish fully open access (OA). The Executive Board of Utrecht University has agreed to a new OA policy to realise this ambition.

 

Building knowledge infrastructure to support research assessment reforms: Dispatches from the Dutch Recognition and Rewards Festival 2022 – Leiden Madtrics

In this blog post we reflect on knowledge infrastructures currently emerging to support organizations that are pursuing research assessment reforms, and call on sociologists of science and research evaluation researchers to study and contribute to these unfolding developments.

Springer Nature continues to lead drive for OA transition across Europe

Springer Nature has today announced its latest transformative agreement (TA), with Italy’s National Research Council (CNR), and also announces the renewal of TAs with the Austrian Academic Library Consortium in Austria and the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU).

The road to 2020

“The Dutch government has put open science on the political agenda: first in 2013 at the national level and then in 2016 at the European level during the Netherlands’ EU Presidency. In February 2017, the National Plan for Open Science – which implemented the European agreements in the Netherlands – was signed by ten parties, including KNAW, NWO/ZonMw and VSNU/UKB (UKB is the Dutch consortium of the thirteen university libraries and the National Library of the Netherlands). One of the key ambitions of the NPOS is 100% open-access publication by 2020, i.e. all scientific publications (articles, books, book excerpts, reports) funded with public money must be freely available for viewing or reuse by anyone in the world as from 2020.

As the driving force behind this key ambition, the VSNU/UKB must initiate collective policy and coordinate the main players in this field. Together with the main parties involved, agreements were made for 2018 – 2020 under the supervision of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The coalition agreement states that open access and open science must become the norm for scientific research….”

The Open Access provision in Dutch copyright contract law

“On 1 July 2015 the Dutch Copyright Contract Act entered into force1 , including the new Art. 25fa of the Dutch Copyright Act that relates to open access.2 This contribution discusses the background to the open access provision and what its introduction means….”

Community Engagement Manager (Open Science Programme)

“The TU Delft aims to make open research and open education a standard part of scientific practice with the Open Science Programme 2020 – 2024, ‘Research and Education in the Open Era’.

Open Science is a way of working that makes the research process more transparent, and research results more accessible – making learning materials, scientific articles, data and code open for anyone to see. It demands new approaches to scholarly communication and has a strong impact on the core academic processes of research, education and innovation.

The TU Delft Open Science Programme 2020-2024 will facilitate and stimulate scientists and teachers to embed the principles of open science in their work. The programme consists of seven interrelated projects: Open Education, Open Access, Open Publishing Platform, FAIR Data, FAIR Software, Open Hardware and Citizen Science. Three cross cutting themes essential for its successful implementation will also be addressed: appropriate rewards and recognition for Open Science practices, building successful collaboration with industry, and skills development….”

Open Science Agreement with Elsevier

From Google’s English:  “On this webpage you will find relevant and up-to-date information about the services provided in the context of the multi-year agreement, from May 2020 to December 2024, between VSNU, NFU, NWO, VH, KNAW and Elsevier. It provides information about the progress of services related to reading and publishing rights and about the joint development of new open science services for Research Intelligence and Scholarly Communication.”

Open Science Agreement with Elsevier

From Google’s English:  “On this webpage you will find relevant and up-to-date information about the services provided in the context of the multi-year agreement, from May 2020 to December 2024, between VSNU, NFU, NWO, VH, KNAW and Elsevier. It provides information about the progress of services related to reading and publishing rights and about the joint development of new open science services for Research Intelligence and Scholarly Communication.”

Response from TU Delft on National Programme Open Science consultation document | Open Working

“Delft University of Technology was delighted to respond to the open consultation for the Dutch National Programme for Open Science 2030. The following summary was drawn from across the university, including researchers and teachers who form part of the university’s Open Science Community, and members of staff working on the university’s Open Science Programme.

Overall, there was satisfaction that a national programme was being developed, providing funding and impetus to make systematic changes to the practice of science within the Netherlands.

However, a number of comments were made indicating where the consultation document to have greater nuance, and awareness of the systematic pressures holding Open Science back….”