The Libraries’ Will Cross receives a Fulbright to study open knowledge and copyright across the EU | NC State University Libraries

“Will Cross, Director of the Libraries’ Open Knowledge Center (OKC) and Head of Information Policy, will be a 2022-2023 Fulbright-Schuman Innovation Fellow studying the future of copyright law and open knowledge practices and policies across the EU.

His project, titled “Community-Based Copyright Literacy in the European Union: Codes of Fair Practice as Core Open Knowledge Infrastructure,” will be centered in the Netherlands where he will study the copyright literacy practices of Dutch researchers, conduct comparative research across the EU and explore the Codes of Fair Practice model for knitting together national laws in order to create shared open knowledge practices. As a Fulbright-Schuman Fellow, Cross will work with partners including the Institute for Information Law (IViR) in the Netherlands and consortium members participating in the reCreating Europe Project. …”

DataWorks! Challenge | HeroX

“Share your story of how you reused or shared data to further your biological and/or biomedical research effort and get recognized!…

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are championing a bold vision of data sharing and reuse. The DataWorks! Prize fuels this vision with an annual challenge that showcases the benefits of research data management while recognizing and rewarding teams whose research demonstrates the power of data sharing or reuse practices to advance scientific discovery and human health. We are seeking new and innovative approaches to data sharing and reuse in the fields of biological and biomedical research. 

To incentivize effective practices and increase community engagement around data sharing and reuse, the 2022 DataWorks! Prize will distribute up to 12 monetary team awards. Submissions will undergo a two-stage review process, with final awards selected by a judging panel of NIH officials. The NIH will recognize winning teams with a cash prize, and winners will share their stories in a DataWorks! Prize symposium.”

From library budget to information budget: fostering transparency in the transformation towards open access

The discussion on the transformation of scholarly journals to open access (OA) increasingly concerns financial aspects. Considering the variety of funding strategies for article processing charge (APCs), the array of cost types for scientific information and the need for data monitoring to promote cost transparency, an integrated view of the financial dimension of the OA transition is needed. This commentary describes the need for implementing an information budget that looks beyond just the library budget and comprehensively targets all financial flows from universities and other research performing organizations to publishers. An information budget promotes an integrated perspective on the distributed costs at a given institution. This centralized approach of assessing financial flows can be used to strengthen the position of research institutions when negotiating with publishers.

DORA Community Engagement Grants: Supporting Academic Assessment Reform | DORA

“DORA sought to fund ideas to advance assessment reform at academic institutions at any stage of readiness. Projects could be targeted to any level within an academic institution, including (but not limited to) reform efforts at the graduate program, department, library, or institution level, and should address one or more key aspects of education, planning, implementing, training, iteratively improving, and scaling policies and practices. More than 55 ideas were submitted from individuals and teams in 29 countries! After careful review, members of the Steering Committee selected 10 proposals to support….”

Study on quality in 3D digitisation of tangible cultural heritage | Shaping Europe’s digital future

“The purpose of this call for tenders is to carry out a study to map parameters, formats, standards, benchmarks, methodologies and guidelines, relating to 3D digitisation of tangible cultural heritage, to the different potential purposes or uses, i.e. preservation, reconstruction, reproduction, research, and general-purpose visualisation, by type of tangible cultural heritage, i.e. immovable or movable, and by degree of complexity of tangible cultural heritage, e.g. low, medium, high, and very high (reference VIGIE-2020-654)….”

UChicago Library awarded grant to digitize Chicagoland’s historical maps | University of Chicago News

“The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded the University of Chicago Library, in partnership with the Newberry Library and the Chicago History Museum, a grant to digitize historical maps of Chicago from the 19th century through 1940.

The grant of $348,930 to fund their proposal, “Mapping Chicagoland,” will also support the enrichment of the digital images with geographic information for use in spatial overlays and analyses, as well as the work to make them open to the public on the UChicago Library website. The maps will also be available through the BTAA (Big Ten Academic Alliance) Geoportal and Chicago Collections platforms….”

CoNOSC Member needs report published

SPARC Europe took on the facilitation of the Council for National Open Science Coordination (CoNOSC) late last year. To kick-start its efforts and plan the work ahead, it investigated the needs of CoNOSC members. We are pleased to publish this report today. 

The report investigates the needs of national policymakers, presenting key takeaways from interviews with CoNOSC members’ representatives – national OS coordinators, ministry officials, research funders and other policymaking decision-makers.

SPARC Europe conducted interviews with 30 representatives from 18 different European nations during January and February 2022, as well as with the Deputy Head of the Open Science Unit from the European Commission, which attends CoNOSC as an observer. The interviews were designed to identify what activities and areas would provide the most significant value through collaboration at CoNOSC without duplicating any current efforts. 

Based on responses, the report identifies the priority areas for CoNOSC as follows:

Data management
Policy monitoring
Research assessment
Copyright and licensing
Open Access funding
Bibliodiversity

 

3Os in Horizon Europe: Open Science, Open Innovation and Open to the World – part III | Europa Media Trainings

“The series of blog posts on 3Os in Horizon Europe is trying to introduce how Open Science, Open Innovation and Open to the World principles affect your following Horizon Europe proposal or funded project.

Open to the World principle may mean many things for your Horizon Europe proposals and projects, e.g.,

How to ensure international knowledge and information exchange outside Europe to tackle global challenges?
How to involve organisations from third countries? (We discuss this question in a separate blog post)
How to promote and use science diplomacy? …”

GW Libraries awards faculty adopting textbook alternatives – The GW Hatchet

“GW awarded grants to faculty who will replace their required, commercial course materials with free, open-source academic resources last week as part of a University-wide effort to lower the cost of textbooks.

GW Libraries launched the Adapting Course Materials for Equity Faculty Grant earlier this semester before awarding grants ranging from $250 to $1000 last week to eight professors who will switch to free, open-source materials, like online textbooks, for courses taught between fall 2022 and fall 2023. Officials said the adoption of free, open-source materials through the grant program will make courses more accessible and alleviate students’ financial burden….”

MPDL is supporting the Peer Community In (PCI) Initiative

Initiated at the request of several Max Planck institutes, the Max Planck Digital Library is supporting the platform „Peer Community in Registered Reports“ by making a one-time funding contribution of 5,000 Euro.

The Peer Community In (PCI) initiative is a non-profit, non-commercial platform that evaluates and recommends preprints in many scientific fields. The overarching aim of this researcher-run organization is to create specific communities of researchers reviewing and recommending, for free, unpublished preprints in their field.

 

UGA Libraries’ Pilot Open Access Publishing Fund to Benefit Graduate Students

 

UGA Libraries has established a new fund that supports open access to knowledge while helping graduate student researchers fulfill their academic goals.

 

The pilot program provides funding for open access publication fees for graduate students whose research papers have been accepted by peer-reviewed academic journals. Those fees make research available freely online, but can be costly for students. The fund is a way for the Libraries to partner with other academic departments to enable that avenue of publication.

Wakeling & Abbasi (2022) Why do journals discontinue? A study of Australian ceased journals – Jamali – 2022 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Jamali, H.R., Wakeling, S. and Abbasi, A. (2022), Why do journals discontinue? A study of Australian ceased journals. Learned Publishing, 35: 219-228. https://doi.org/10.1002/leap.1448

 

Abstract: Little is known about why journals discontinue despite its significant implications. We present an analysis of 140 Australian journals that ceased from 2011 to mid-2021 and present the results of a survey of editors of 53 of them. The death age of journals was 19.7 (median = 16) with 57% being 10?years or older. About 54% of them belonged to educational institutions and 34% to non-profit organizations. In terms of subject, 75% of the journals belonged to social sciences, humanities and arts. The survey showed that funding was an important reason for discontinuation, and lack of quality submission and lack of support from the owners of the journal also played a role. Too much reliance on voluntary works appeared to be an issue for editorial processes. The dominant metric culture in the research environment and pressure for journals to perform well in journal rankings negatively affect local journals in attracting quality submissions. A fifth of journals indicated that they did not have a plan for the preservation of articles at the time of publication and the current availability of the content of ceased journals appeared to be sub-optimal in many cases with reliance on the website of ceased journals or web-archive platforms.

 

 

Key points

 

One hundred and forty Australian journals ceased publishing between 2011 and 2020, with an average age of 19?years on cessation.
The majority of Australian journals that ceased publication 2011–2020 were in the social sciences, humanities and arts where local journals play an important role.
Funding was found to be a key reason for journal discontinuation followed by lack of support and quality submissions and over-reliance on voluntary work.
Metric driven culture and journal rankings adversely impact local journals and can lead to discontinuation.
Many journals have neither sustainable business models (or funding), nor a preservation plan, both of which jeopardize journal continuation and long-term access to archive content.

 

Libraries and Diamond Open Access | The Scholarly Tales: For and by researchers, librarians and other scholarly folk at KU Leuven’s Faculty of Arts

The following is the redacted text of a statement given by Demmy Verbeke at the “The Diamond Open Access Model: what impact on research?” webinar organized by Academia Europaea Cardiff, KU Leuven Libraries and the Young Academy of Europe on March 28, 2022.

 

Research Update: COIs, Defining Infrastructure, and Exploring Utility Financing as a Useful Model

The following is a brief summary of our current plans for Catalog of Infrastructures, our work understanding the nature of infrastructure, and our initial working models for understanding the funding and operation of infrastructure services.