Reminder: NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing effective on January 25, 2023.

“The purpose of this notice is to remind the community of the effective date of the NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing (DMS Policy) and summarize available key resources.

As noted in the Final NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing (NOT-OD-21-013), the effective date of the DMS Policy is January 25, 2023 for competing grant applications submitted to NIH for the January 25, 2023 and subsequent receipt dates; proposals for contracts  submitted to NIH on or after January 25, 2023; NIH Intramural Research Projects conducted on or after January 25, 2023; and other funding agreements (e.g., Other Transactions)  executed on or after January 25, 2023, unless otherwise stipulated by NIH.

The DMS Policy applies to all NIH research, funded or conducted in whole or in part by NIH, that results in the generation of scientific data. Note that the DMS Policy does not apply to research and other activities that do not generate scientific data, for example: research training, fellowships, infrastructure development, and non-research activities. See Research Covered Under the Data Management & Sharing Policy for more details.

The DMS Policy has two basic requirements:

Submission of a Data Management and Sharing (DMS) Plan outlining how scientific data and any accompanying metadata will be managed and shared, considering any potential restrictions or limitations. 
Compliance with the Plan approved by the funding NIH Institute, Center, or Office.

DMS Plans should describe how data will be managed and appropriately shared. See Writing a Data Management & Sharing Plan for details, sample Plans, and an optional format page which includes six elements recommended to be included in a Data Management and Sharing Plan. Guidance on planning and budgeting and selecting a data repository are available on the NIH Scientific Data Sharing website. Application Guide instructions have been updated to provide instructions for DMS policy implementation.

Ultimately, the new DMS Policy promotes transparency and accountability in research by setting a minimum set of expectations for data management and sharing. This means that other NIH policies or NIH Institutes, Centers, Offices, or programs may build upon these expectations, for instance, by specifying scientific data to share, relevant standards, repository timelines, and/or shorter data sharing timelines for meeting programmatic needs, the DMS Policy sets a consistent baseline across NIH.

In preparing for DMS Policy implementation, NIH has developed a number of helpful resources that we encourage investigators and institutions to review:

DMS Policy Overview
DMS Policy FAQs
Learning Resources including 2-part webinar series on DMS Policy
Statements and Guide Notices …”

Wiley and CzechELib Sign First Open Access Agreement in Czech Republic | John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

“Wiley, one of the world’s largest publishers and a global leader in research and education, today announced an open access agreement with Czech National Library of Technology (NTK) (CzechELib).

The four-year agreement will provide CzechELib participants access to view and publish in Wiley’s complete hybrid journal portfolio, which includes 1,400 journals, beginning January 16, 2023. Wiley is pioneering the open access movement in Czech Republic, being one of the first publishers to sign an open access agreement within the country. Participating researchers will be able to publish nearly 650 articles open access within the first year….”

cOAlition S confirms the end of its financial support for Open Access publishing under transformative arrangements after 2024 | Plan S

Transformative arrangements – including Transformative Agreements and Transformative Journals – were developed to encourage subscription journals to transition to full and immediate open access within a defined timeframe (31st December 2024, as specified in the Plan S Implementation Guidance). After careful consideration of the outcomes of transformative arrangements, the leadership of cOAlition S reaffirms that, as a principle, its members will no longer financially support these arrangements after 2024.

Exceptionally, individual cOAlition S funders may still choose to financially participate in Transformative Agreements beyond 2024 as part of their respective national strategies. Such exceptions will be communicated on the cOAlition S website.

Support for Transformative Journals will also cease at the end of 2024. In anticipation of this, no new applications to this programme will be considered after the 30th of June 2023.

 

Jisc announces partnership with open access publisher Copernicus | STM Publishing News

“Jisc has announced a new agreement with Copernicus Publications, a fully open access, not-for-profit publisher, whose portfolio of journals covers engineering, geosciences, humanities, and life sciences. 

The agreement helps institutions streamline administering open access publication, making it quicker and easier.

Copernicus uses simple, fair and reasonable article processing charges (APCs) and created one of the first public and fully transparent peer-review processes for academic journals.

Jisc members can now set up a prepayment account or choose to be invoiced for several papers on a single invoice….”

Funding Open Infrastructure as a Public Utility: A Preliminary Investigation in Water Utility Funding | Invest in Open Infrastructure, Jan 23, 2023

“In our engagements with infrastructure service providers, one of their biggest challenges we’ve repeatedly heard is the need for more stable funding for infrastructure services. Providers are developing more innovative strategies to sustain their work. However, through our conversations and analysis of funding trends, it became apparent that funding in the open infrastructure space remains largely unpredictable, and many providers continue to search for more stable and reliable sources of revenue to ensure the sustainability of the services they provide. In understanding how a stable and reliable model for funding open infrastructure in research and scholarly communication could be architected, we looked at how public utilities, in particular water utilities, are funded around the world. Today, we share a report from our preliminary investigation into water utility funding. Drawing on some of the preeminent literature and guidance on the topic from widely respected organizations (the OECD, WHO, and IRC), we highlight some key lessons for funding a robust infrastructure of open services. Key to this is understanding knowledge as a public good, like water, electricity, and natural gas, and how these vital public goods are best funded for reliable, robust, and sustainable supply in the long term….”

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7076158

AI, Instructional Design, and OER – improving learning

“In other words, as far as the US Copyright Office is concerned, output from programs like ChatGPT or Stable Diffusion are not eligible for copyright protection. Now, that could change if Congress gets involved (are they actually capable of doing anything?), or if the Supreme Court turned its collective back on decades of precedent (which, admittedly, has been happening recently). But unless something rather dramatic happens along these lines, the outputs of generative AI programs will continue to pass immediately into the public domain. Consequently, they will be open educational resources under the common definition….

Generative AI tools could have an incredible impact on the breadth and diversity of OER that exist, since they will dramatically decrease the cost and time necessary to create the informational resources that underlie these learning materials. Current funding for the creation of OER (when it’s available at all) typically focuses on the courses enrolling the largest number of students. This makes sense when your theory of philanthropy is that the money you spend should benefit the most people possible. But that theory of philanthropy also means that the “long tail” of courses that each enroll relatively few students are unlikely to ever receive funding. LLMs will radically alter the economics of creating OER, and should make it possible for OER to come to these courses as well. (And while LLMs will have a significant impact on the economics of creating OER, they may not have as dramatic an impact on the sustainability, maintenance, and upkeep of OER over time.)…”

An open database on global coal and metal mine production | Scientific Data

Abstract:  While the extraction of natural resources has been well documented and analysed at the national level, production trends at the level of individual mines are more difficult to uncover, mainly due to poor availability of mining data with sub-national detail. In this paper, we contribute to filling this gap by presenting an open database on global coal and metal mine production on the level of individual mines. It is based on manually gathered information from more than 1900 freely available reports of mining companies, where every data point is linked to its source document, ensuring full transparency. The database covers 1171 individual mines and reports mine-level production for 80 different materials in the period 2000–2021. Furthermore, also data on mining coordinates, ownership, mineral reserves, mining waste, transportation of mining products, as well as mineral processing capacities (smelters and mineral refineries) and production is included.

 

Community consensus on core open science practices to monitor in biomedicine | PLOS Biology

Abstract:  The state of open science needs to be monitored to track changes over time and identify areas to create interventions to drive improvements. In order to monitor open science practices, they first need to be well defined and operationalized. To reach consensus on what open science practices to monitor at biomedical research institutions, we conducted a modified 3-round Delphi study. Participants were research administrators, researchers, specialists in dedicated open science roles, and librarians. In rounds 1 and 2, participants completed an online survey evaluating a set of potential open science practices, and for round 3, we hosted two half-day virtual meetings to discuss and vote on items that had not reached consensus. Ultimately, participants reached consensus on 19 open science practices. This core set of open science practices will form the foundation for institutional dashboards and may also be of value for the development of policy, education, and interventions.

 

Model(s) of the future? Overlay journals as an overlooked and emerging trend in scholarly communication | The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

Abstract: Overlay journals, a potentially overlooked model of scholarly communication, have seen a resurgence due to the increasing number of preprint repositories and preprints on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related topics. Overlay journals at various stages of maturity were examined for unique characteristics, including whether the authors submitted their article to the journal, whether the peer reviews of the article were published by the overlay journal, and whether the overlay journals took advantage of opportunities for increased discovery. As librarians and researchers seek new, futuristic models for publishing, overlay journals are emerging as an important contribution to scholarly communication.

 

Reconceptualizing Open Access to Theses and Dissertations | infojustice

Abstract: Theses and dissertations (TD) are academic research projects that are conducted by graduate students to acquire a high academic degree, such as a PhD. The perception of the written TD has evolved over the years, following changes concerning the purpose of advanced academic studies. Today, these academic fruits should meet a high standard of academic innovation, which is understood broadly as encompassing not only knowledge concerning basic science but also the knowledge that generates social and economic value for society.

The modern perception of TD has generated a call for their greater accessibility, as part of the Open Science movement. Nevertheless, in many countries around the world TD are not published in an open access format. While the normative basis for open access approach to publicly funded academic research is extensively discussed in the literature, there is a lack of legal and normative discussion concerning the special case of TD. The present study aims at filling this gap.

We argue that the essence of TD as unique outputs of academic research merits a special stance compelling the publication of these studies in open access format, subject to certain exceptions. This stance is underpinned by several arguments, which we develop in our study, based on historic and normative analysis. Moreover, we propose to establish a mandatory global policy and standardization regarding the publication of TD in designated repositories, open to the public, that would generate together an “open world wide web of TD.” Such a global framework will facilitate the progress of science and promote the public good worldwide.

Case Study: ROR in FAIRsharing

“In this installment of the ROR Case Studies series, we talk with Allyson Lister, Content and Community Lead for FAIRsharing, a cross-disciplinary registry of scientific standards, databases, and policies, about how and why FAIRsharing used ROR to help make organizations first-class citizens in their data model….”

 

The Horrors of Good Intentions: Told through the story of a dark repository.

“The library manages a dark repository, named Dark Blue because I have no imagination, for material needing preservation but not public access such as preservation copies of digitized moving image and in-process born-digital material. You can read more about the implementation of this repository in this 2018 post. It is fair to say that Dark Blue had some growing pains over these past few years that include incorrect packaging of material and broken deposit and withdrawal workflows. While these sound like technical problems, the thesis of this post is that our troubles with Dark Blue are not based on bad systems or policies, but the limitation of people and time, and choosing to do the “nice” thing over the realistic thing….”

 

Canadian policy: Data management requirement takes effect in March

“Canadian institutions are preparing for a research data management policy developed by three major federal granting agencies to go into effect this March. The policy of the Tri-Agency Council, comprising the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), asserts that “research data collected through the use of public funds should be responsibly and securely managed and be, where ethical, legal and commercial obligations allow, available for reuse by others.” Dryad would be pleased to assist any Canadian institution seeking a solution to help support their affiliated researchers with this policy….”