Guest Post — Introducing Demographic Questions during Manuscript Submission at the American Psychological Association

Katie Einhorn, Steph Pollock, and Nick Paolini discuss APA’s efforts to collect demographic information during manuscript submission. In this interview, they share what they did, why, how, and what this means for other publishing organizations.

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Where Does Enhancement End and Citation Begin?

As more publishers semantically enrich documents, Todd Carpenter considers whether links are the same as citations

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The dawn of the age of duplicate peer review

Simultaneously submitting an article to multiple journals is considered an ethical violation. But the growth of preprints means that many articles are undergoing simultaneous yet parallel peer review processes. Will duplicate peer review become the norm?

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Revisiting: Theory of the E-book

Joe Esposito revisits his 2012 post on the unstated theory of the e-book, which assumes that a book consists only of its text and can be manipulated without regard to the nature and circumstances of its creation. This is only one theory of many, but it is now the prevailing one.

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Revisiting: Is There a Business Case for Open Data?

Revisiting Tim Vines’ 2017 post — Open data continues to gain ground, but is there a revenue stream that would help journals recover the costs of gathering, reviewing and publishing data?

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Popularizing Cosmology: The Example of Katie Mack

It also can be something of a trap for a well-intentioned academic who wants to write for this audience, as writing for the lay person is often contemptuously dismissed as “popularization.” Woe to the academic who puts an article from The Atlantic or a book from Simon & Schuster into her tenure portfolio! It takes courage. My view is that these brave souls should be called out and celebrated. They are my heroes.

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Subscribe to Open (S2O): An Interview Post in Two Parts (Part 2)

Robert Harington interviews a number of experts with a few burning questions on the Subscribe to Open (S2O) model in a two part post, part two appearing here.

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Subscribe to Open (S2O): An Interview Post in Two Parts (Part 1)

Robert Harington interviews a number of experts with a few burning questions on the Subscribe to Open (S2O) model in a two part post, part one appearing here:

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Preprints Are Not Going to Replace Journals

At a recent meeting, a debate was held on the motion: Preprints are going to replace journals. I was asked to oppose the motion and this post is based on my arguments.

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