Revisiting: Interstitial Publishing

Looking back at a 2015 post on the idea of interstitial publishing, a new form of publishing that aims to take advantage of what previously was viewed as lost time in between primary events during the day.

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Guest Post — Enabling Trustable, Transparent, and Efficient Submission and Review in an Era of Digital Transformation

Digital transformation in submission and peer review offers improvements for publications and a better experience for researchers and journal staff.

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Guest Post – AI and Scholarly Publishing: A View from Three Experts

A recap of a recent SSP webinar on artificial intelligence (AI) and scholarly publishing. How can this set of technologies help or harm scholarly publishing, and what are some current trends? What are the risks of AI, and what should we look out for?

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GitHub is Sued, and We May Learn Something About Creative Commons Licensing

GitHub and Microsoft are being sued for using open source software without creator attribution in alleged violation of open licensing requirements. What implications does this have for the scholarly literature and Creative Commons licenses?

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Guest Post — The Time Has Come to Start Swimming Upstream: How Meaningful Engagement with Authors Early in the Research Process Can Yield Significant Benefits to Publishers

Avi Staiman discusses how meaningful engagement with authors early in the research process can yield significant benefits to publishers and journals.

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Chef’s Selections: Best Books Read and Favorite Cultural Creations During 2022, Part 1

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read (and other cultural creations experienced) during the year. Part 1 today.

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FORCE11 and COPE Release Recommendations on Data Publishing Ethics for Publishers and Repositories: A Discussion with the Working Group Leadership

FORCE11 and COPE release recommendations on data publishing ethics for researchers, publishers, and editors.

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Thoughts and Observations on the OSTP Responses to Our Interview Questions

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson reflect on the OSTP’s response to their interview questions, and on some implications of those responses and of the memo itself.

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Equity, Inclusiveness, and Zero Embargo Public Access

Robert Harington considers whether open and public access models, as they have emerged so far, are delivering us to a more inequitable publishing future as we rush towards openness.

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Revisiting — Compliance: The Coming Storm

A look back at a 2015 post about approaches to improve funder policy compliance. Many of the same problems exist now as did then — are the same collaborative solutions likely to happen?

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Revisiting — Should You “Revise and Resubmit”? Probably

Today Angela Cochran revisits a post from 2016 on “revise and resubmit” decisions and what it means for authors and editors. Do new peer review models or cascading programs change the use of “revise and resubmit”?

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Guest Post — Has Peer Review Created a Toxic Culture in Academia? Moving from ‘Battering’ to ‘Bettering’ in the Review of Academic Research

Avi Staiman suggests revamping the peer review process to make it less about tearing down the work of others, and more about helping authors improve their papers.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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Revisiting — Return of the Big Brands: How Legacy Publishers Will Coopt Open Access

Revisiting a 2015 post that predicted the dominance of the cascade model of journal portfolio publishing and the increased dominance of the larger existing publishers in an open access market.

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