Equity, Inclusiveness, and Zero Embargo Public Access

Robert Harington considers whether open and public access models, as they have emerged so far, are delivering us to a more inequitable publishing future as we rush towards openness.

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Revisiting — Compliance: The Coming Storm

A look back at a 2015 post about approaches to improve funder policy compliance. Many of the same problems exist now as did then — are the same collaborative solutions likely to happen?

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Revisiting — Should You “Revise and Resubmit”? Probably

Today Angela Cochran revisits a post from 2016 on “revise and resubmit” decisions and what it means for authors and editors. Do new peer review models or cascading programs change the use of “revise and resubmit”?

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Guest Post — Has Peer Review Created a Toxic Culture in Academia? Moving from ‘Battering’ to ‘Bettering’ in the Review of Academic Research

Avi Staiman suggests revamping the peer review process to make it less about tearing down the work of others, and more about helping authors improve their papers.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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Revisiting — Return of the Big Brands: How Legacy Publishers Will Coopt Open Access

Revisiting a 2015 post that predicted the dominance of the cascade model of journal portfolio publishing and the increased dominance of the larger existing publishers in an open access market.

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Guest Post — Striking the Right Chord with Millennial and GenZ Researchers

To what extent are scholarly publishers and societies actively engaging with early career researchers? Findings from a white paper, and polls at the SSP annual meeting, are shared.

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Desperately Seeking (Statistical) Significance

Twitter does not increase citations, a reanalysis of author data shows. Did the authors p-hack their data?

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Fill in the Blank Leads to More Citations

When a reputable journal refuses to get involved with a questionable paper, science looks less like a self-correcting enterprise and more like a way to amass media attention.

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Q: Can You Revoke a Creative Commons License? A: No. Er… Sort Of? Maybe?

A Creative Commons license is irrevocable; it says so right in the license. But it also says you can change your mind and distribute the work differently, or not at all. What does this mean?

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ACS Publications commits its entire hybrid journal portfolio to become transformative journals – American Chemical Society

The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has committed its full portfolio of more than 60 hybrid journals, which offers both open access and subscription-only content, to become Plan S-aligned transformative journals. This development represents a major step in ACS’ long-standing commitment to open science, signaling a future in which all publications are open access (OA), and ensures that more authors can continue to publish in their chosen journal.

A New Twist on a Publishing Scam: Ghost-authoring Book Reviews for Fun and Profit

In a new twist on academic fraud, a company now offers to pay you to write and publish book reviews that will be credited to someone else.

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