Guest Post – Wikipedia’s Citations Are Influencing Scholars and Publishers

Rachel Helps, the Wikipedian-in-residence at the BYU libraries discusses the intersection of scholarly journals and Wikipedia.

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Fill in the Blank Leads to More Citations

When a reputable journal refuses to get involved with a questionable paper, science looks less like a self-correcting enterprise and more like a way to amass media attention.

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Expanded Access to Paywalled Content: A Hidden Benefit of Transformative Agreements

What has not made headlines but is also a noteworthy outcome of transformative agreements is the significant increase in access and readership for paywalled articles that they facilitate. 

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Revisiting: The Multifarious Book

Revisiting a 2017 post: The book is asked to perform many tasks, some of which are not necessarily the best use of the book format, whether in print or electronically. The long-form text, which may be print or digital, is a different matter, and is likely to remain with us and be called “a book” for some time to come.

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Guest Post — Does Open Access Cannibalize Print Sales for Monographs?

John Sherer describes a new research project which will look at the impact of open access on print monograph sales, particularly in light of the free access provided early in the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Guest Post — Towards Standardizing Plain Language Summaries: The Open Pharma Recommendations

Adeline Rosenberg offers a look into the value of providing plain language summaries in research papers, and the standards created for doing so.

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Where Does Enhancement End and Citation Begin?

As more publishers semantically enrich documents, Todd Carpenter considers whether links are the same as citations

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Revisiting: Theory of the E-book

Joe Esposito revisits his 2012 post on the unstated theory of the e-book, which assumes that a book consists only of its text and can be manipulated without regard to the nature and circumstances of its creation. This is only one theory of many, but it is now the prevailing one.

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Popularizing Cosmology: The Example of Katie Mack

It also can be something of a trap for a well-intentioned academic who wants to write for this audience, as writing for the lay person is often contemptuously dismissed as “popularization.” Woe to the academic who puts an article from The Atlantic or a book from Simon & Schuster into her tenure portfolio! It takes courage. My view is that these brave souls should be called out and celebrated. They are my heroes.

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