PKP’s free and open source software (FOSS) version 3.4 for OJS, OMP & OPS: A sneak-peek – Public Knowledge Project

“PKP released development updates in December. In advance of releasing the Open Journal Systems (OJS), Open Monograph Press (OMP), and Open Preprint Systems (OPS) software in version 3.4 this year, the PKP team offers a sneak-peek of what to expect, why they are most excited for the community, and some personal insights from their own work on the Project….”

Opinion: Why we’re becoming a Digital Public Good — and why we aren’t | Devex

“A few months ago, Medtronic LABS made the decision to open source our digital health platform SPICE, and pursue certification as a Digital Public Good. DPGs are defined by the Digital Public Good Alliance as: “Open-source software, open data, open AI models, open standards, and open content that adhere to privacy and other applicable laws and best practices, do no harm by design, and help attain the Sustainable Development Goals.” The growing momentum around DPGs in global health is relatively new, coinciding with the launch of the U.N. Secretary General’s Roadmap for Digital Cooperation in 2020. The movement aims to put governments in the driver’s seat, promote better collaboration among development partners, and reduce barriers to the digitization of health systems.”

Open hardware: From DIY trend to global transformation in access to laboratory equipment | PLOS Biology

Abstract:  Open hardware solutions are increasingly being chosen by researchers as a strategy to improve access to technology for cutting-edge biology research. The use of DIY technology is already widespread, particularly in countries with limited access to science funding, and is catalyzing the development of open-source technologies. Beyond financial accessibility, open hardware can be transformational for the access of laboratories to equipment by reducing dependence on import logistics and enabling direct knowledge transfer. Central drivers to the adoption of appropriate open-source technologies in biology laboratories around the world are open sharing, digital fabrication, local production, the use of standard parts, and detailed documentation. This Essay examines the global spread of open hardware and discusses which kinds of open-source technologies are the most beneficial in scientific environments with economic and infrastructural constraints.

 

A Brief Introduction to openalexR

“openalexR helps you interface with the OpenAlex API to retrieve bibliographic infomation about publications, authors, venues, institutions and concepts with 4 main functions:

oa_query(): generates a valid query, written following the OpenAlex API syntax, from a set of arguments provided by the user.

oa_request(): downloads a collection of entities matching the query created by oa_query() or manually written by the user, and returns a JSON object in a list format.

oa2df(): converts the JSON object in classical bibliographic tibble/data frame.

oa_fetch(): composes three functions above so the user can execute everything in one step, i.e., oa_query |> oa_request |> oa2df…”

Twenty-Fifth Year Reflections on PKP – Public Knowledge Project

“In 1998, I initiated a project that set out to make research a greater part of what constituted public knowledge. I called it a Public Knowledge project. That is, before PKP was PKP, it was PKp. The initial project arose out of a modest gift to the University of British Columbia from Pacific Press, the company that owned Vancouver’s two newspapers, the Vancouver Sun and Province. On learning of this gift to UBC, where I served as a Faculty of Education professor, I proposed that this new Pacific Press Professorship explore how the internet, with all its early promise as an “information highway,” could increase public access to research and scholarship. This would complement the Pacific Press’ journalism, I suggested, as well as advance educational goals, by expanding the storehouse of public knowledge….”

 

 

Introducing Jot — a new open-source tool that help researchers with journal selection < Yale School of Public Health

“Say hello to Jot: a free, open-source web application that matches manuscripts in the fields of biomedicine and life sciences with suitable journals, based on a manuscript’s title, abstract, and (optionally) citations.

Developed by the Townsend Lab at the Yale School of Public Health, Jot gathers a wealth of data on journal quality, impact, fit, and open access options that can be explored through a dashboard of linked, interactive visualizations….”

Giving students everywhere up-close access to a world of art – Harvard Gazette

“Since its inception, the database of cultural heritage images available for free online with IIIF capability has continued to grow. In 2022, the IIIF community estimated that between all their participating cultural heritage institutions, they’ve made available more than 1 billion items available.

“With IIIF, we’re investing in the cultural heritage image community,” Snydman said. “Our goal is global, universal, as open as possible. It’s not just about Harvard’s images; it’s about enabling students and faculty to interact in the very same way with images at Oxford, the Library of Congress, or the Vatican that they do with images held at Harvard. The code word for this is interoperability.”

Of the 1 billion IIIF-compatible items, about 6 million are held in Harvard’s library collections. Everything from 500-year-old maps to modern photographs are viewable in high resolution by anyone with an internet connection. Emily Dickinson’s pencil strokes can be magnified and examined, and Persian manuscripts like the one studied by Kim’s class can be compared with illustrations from the same region and period held at the Library of Congress….

“The fact that IIIF has been able to become a universal standard, and that it’s all open-source — that has exciting implications for democratized learning,” said Snydman. “Students and scholars of all ages have the opportunity to learn with images — not just in a physical classroom or library, not just during certain hours, and not just on Harvard’s campus. This is a great example of how technology can be used to minimize inequalities in education and give open access to knowledge.” …”

In the works at OA.Works in 2022

“In 2022, our focus was on building OA.Report (a blog on that coming soon! Join our mailing list to be notified). But, as 2022 becomes 2023, we wanted to take the chance to celebrate the other work we did to help make Open Access easy & equitable. So, without further ado:

Our governance got an update as we joined Code for Science & Society (a US-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit), and our new advisory committee got to work….
Our new transparency page helped the community learn more about our operations….
OA.Support, our new Open Access helpdesk, facilitated self-archiving through 430 follow-up emails, answering 100 questions and capturing dozens of researcher quotes for policy development. The Gates foundation is the first to deploy the service fully, and we’re both encouraged by these results….
At a United Nations library event, we launched a new collaboration with the  Open Climate Campaign to help unlock climate change research….
We enhanced the cOAlition S Journal Checker Tool by providing new data on what type of Open Access a journal supports (e.g., Diamond, Transformative, Hybrid, Gold), as well as fast updates to ShareYourPaper Permissions data.
Our team met in-person for the first time to bond, scheme, and build!
We stopped using Google Analytics to protect our users’ privacy. A small step to align ourselves with our values.
We celebrated our first anniversary as OA.Works after our rebrand in 2021! We’ve been so pleased with the communities response….
RSCVD has now facilitated more than 22,000 requests for access by libraries impacted by COVID-19, with more than 14,000 fulfilled requests.
ShareYourPaper unpaywalled more than 350 articles!
We updated ShareYourPaper and InstantILL to improve their performance and maintainability and squash bugs.
We continued to learn! We attended conferences on user experience in Libraries, courses on Critical Management Studies & Critical Concepts in Library and Information Sciences, and mastered new systems like Cloudflare Workers.
We started helping run the Open Access Tracking Project mailing list to help the OA movement stay in the know –– just one of many times we tried to lend a hand to other valuable projects.”

Open Education as a lever for social justice and equity – Exploring the many on ramps of Open STEM education

“The Open Education Ecosystem can be thought of as a roundabout where educators and researchers enter into a high-impact landscape through many different on ramps, including Open Educational Resources (OER), Open Data, Open Science, Open Pedagogy, or any of the many aspects of Open Education Ecosystem. Here we describe these common on ramps, transitions, and intersections between different facets of the Open Education landscape and more importantly how Open Education can be leveraged to promote social justice and equity in STEM education.

Open Educational Resources (OER) save students millions of dollars, but the potential impact of these resources extends far beyond promoting equity through cost savings (Dembecki, 2022). Instructors often join the conversation about Open Education by using OER and quickly realize that OER are actually a launching point into higher-impact pedagogical practices. Before getting into using these resources to promote social justice and equity and engaging in Open Education more broadly we need to understand what OERs are and are not.

Open Educational Resources (OER) are not simply defined as any resources freely accessed on websites nor are they solely free textbooks. They are specifically freely and publicly available teaching, learning, and research materials where Creative Commons licensing enables retaining, remixing, revising, reusing, and redistributing the resources (5Rs, Wiley). The term OER is often used synonymously with free, but OER are much more than an alternative to standard physical and digital texts. OER can include software, datasets, teaching modules, laboratory exercises, research methods, computational scripts and workflows, study guides and test banks, and much more. At the very least, implementing OER in a course reduces the cost burden of education for students enabling all students to afford course materials. In addition to cost savings, OER can promote student success and in some cases even more so for students from minoritized populations thus extending equity beyond reducing cost (Colvard, Watson, and Park, 2018). The benefits of using OER are not the OER themselves, but what you can do with them. Adapting and remixing OER enhances the learning experience and promotes social justice and equity through resource modification. OER can be modified to achieve:

greater alignment to content, context, and cognitive level 
accessibility and ease of use
flexibility in pedagogical approach 
contextualizing for local or cultural relevance
prioritizing and promoting minoritized voices…”

Introducing Jot — a new open-source tool that help researchers with journal selection < Yale School of Medicine

“Say hello to Jot: a free, open-source web application that matches manuscripts in the fields of biomedicine and life sciences with suitable journals, based on a manuscript’s title, abstract, and (optionally) citations….”

Open Source Infrastructure Engineer: Site Reliability Engineering and Cloud Infrastructure | 2i2c

“2i2c manages, supports, and builds community-centric infrastructure for interactive computing in the cloud with partner communities in research and education.

We’re looking for an Open Source Infrastructure Engineer that will join our Site Reliability Engineering team and make our cloud infrastructure more reliable, scalable, and efficient. It will help build a future of data-intensive scientific research and democratize the design and access to cloud-based resources for research and education purposes….”

Bypass Paywalls Clean – Get this Extension for ? Firefox (en-GB)

“Add-on allows you to read articles from websites that implement a paywall.

Not everyone is able to afford multiple subscriptions on many different news sites, especially when they just want to read a single article (from Twitter) without being enrolled in a monthly/yearly membership.

Notice: if you use this add-on regularly on the same website, please consider paying a subscription for it. Don’t forget that free press can’t be sustainable without funding….”

A Python library to check the level of anonymity of a dataset | Scientific Data

Abstract:  Openly sharing data with sensitive attributes and privacy restrictions is a challenging task. In this document we present the implementation of pyCANON, a Python library and command line interface (CLI) to check and assess the level of anonymity of a dataset through some of the most common anonymization techniques: k-anonymity, (?,k)-anonymity, ?-diversity, entropy ?-diversity, recursive (c,?)-diversity, t-closeness, basic ?-likeness, enhanced ?-likeness and ?-disclosure privacy. For the case of more than one sensitive attribute, two approaches are proposed for evaluating these techniques. The main strength of this library is to obtain a full report of the parameters that are fulfilled for each of the techniques mentioned above, with the unique requirement of the set of quasi-identifiers and sensitive attributes. The methods implemented are presented together with the attacks they prevent, the description of the library, examples of the different functions’ usage, as well as the impact and the possible applications that can be developed. Finally, some possible aspects to be incorporated in future updates are proposed.

 

Linux Foundation’s ‘AgStack Project’ Plans First Dataset of the World’s Agricultural Field Boundaries – Slashdot

“The nonprofit Linux Foundation not only pays the salary of Linus Torvalds and Greg Kroah-Hartman. It also runs the AgStack Foundation, which seeks more efficient agriculture through “free, re-usable, open and specialized digital infrastructure for data and applications.”

And this week that Foundation announced a new open source code base for creating and maintaining a global dataset that’s a kind of registry for the boundaries of agricultural fields to enable field-level analytics like carbon tracking, food traceability, and crop production….”