CORE: Our commitment to The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure – CORE

The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI) offer a set of guidelines by which open scholarly infrastructure organisations and initiatives that support the research community can be operated and sustained. In this post, we demonstrate CORE’s commitment to adhere to these principles and show our current progress in achieving these aims. The principles are divided into three main categories; Governance, Sustainability and Insurance:

Webcast: Open systems and library analytics – 1501970

“Open source software and interoperable services for library management and analytics provide libraries with more choice in how to deploy, support and develop mission-critical applications. Join this webinar to learn more about EBSCO’s support for FOLIO, the open source library services platform, and Panorama, an interoperable application for library analytics.”

Supporting knowledge creation and sharing by building a standardised interconnected repository of biodiversity data | Zenodo

“This EOSC in practice story was developed within the Cos4cloud project and targets a very wide user base as it is addressed to any researchers, teachers, students, companies, institutions and, more generally, anyone interested in knowing, studying or analysing biodiversity information.

The story presents Cos4Bio, a co-designed, interoperable and open-source service that integrates biodiversity observations from multiple citizen observatories in one place, allowing experts to save time in the species identification process and get access to an enormous number of biodiversity observations. This resource is available on the EOSC Portal Catalogue and Marketplace …”

Supporting knowledge creation and sharing by building a standardised interconnected repository of biodiversity data | EOSC Portal

“This EOSC in practice story targets a very wide user base as it is addressed to any researchers, teachers, students, companies, institutions and, more generally, anyone interested in knowing, studying or analysing biodiversity information. It was developed within the Cos4cloud project….

Cos4Bio is a co-designed, interoperable and open-source service that integrates biodiversity observations from multiple citizen observatories in one place, allowing experts to save time in the species identification process and get access to an enormous number of biodiversity observations….”

Meta has built a massive new language AI—and it’s giving it away for free | MIT Technology Review

“Meta’s AI lab has created a massive new language model that shares both the remarkable abilities and the harmful flaws of OpenAI’s pioneering neural network GPT-3. And in an unprecedented move for Big Tech, it is giving it away to researchers—together with details about how it was built and trained….

Meta’s move is the first time that a fully trained large language model will be made available to any researcher who wants to study it. The news has been welcomed by many concerned about the way this powerful technology is being built by small teams behind closed doors….”

Extending the open monitoring of open science – Archive ouverte HAL

Abstract:  Abstract : We present a new Open Science Monitor framework at the country level for the case of France. We propose a fine-grained monitoring of the dynamics of the open access to publications, based on historical data from Unpaywall, and thus limited to Crossref-DOI documents. The economic models of journals publishing French publications are analyéed as well as the open access dynamics by discipline and open access route (publishers and repositories). The French Open Science Monitor (BSO) website: https://frenchopensciencemonitor.esr.gouv.fr presents the results to date (last observation date December 2021). 62% of the 170,000 French 2020 publications are available in December 2021. This rate has increased by 10 points in one year. The level of open access varies significantly from one discipline to another. Some disciplines, such as the physical sciences and mathematics, have long been committed to opening up their publications, while others, such as chemistry, are rapidly catching up. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis and the urgent need to open up scholarly outputs in the health field, a specific version of the French Open Science Monitor has been built: https://frenchopensciencemonitor.esr.gouv.fr/health. It monitors the open access dynamics of French publications in the biomedical field. It also analyses the transparency of the results of clinical trials and observational studies conducted in France. Only 57% of clinical trials completed in the last 10 years have shared their results publicly. In contrast to other Open Science Monitoring initiatives, the source code and the data of the French Open Science Monitor are shared with an open licence. The source code used for the French Open Science Monitor is available on GitHub, and shared with an open licence. The code is split in modules, in particular for indicators computations https://github.com/dataesr/bso-publications and https://github.com/dataesr/bso-clinical-trials and the web user interface https://github.com/dataesr/bso-ui. The data resulting of this work is shared on the French Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation open data portal: https://data.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/explore/dataset/open-access-monitor-france/information/ and https://data.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/explore/dataset/barometre-sante-de-la-science-ouverte/information/. The originality of the French Open Science Monitor also lies in the fact that it can easily be adapted to the level of an higher education and research institution. To date, some twenty higher education and research institutions have already used it to obtain reliable and open indicators on the progress of open science in their scientific production.

 

VuFind® Joins the Open Library Foundation | Open Library Foundation

“VuFind® has joined the Open Library Foundation. The open source library discovery tool was developed at Villanova University and is maintained by an international development community that has been coordinated by staff at the University’s Falvey Memorial Library since 2007. VuFind is joining the foundation in order to ensure the long-term sustainability of VuFind, which is used by hundreds of libraries around the world.

By joining the Open Library Foundation, VuFind will benefit from infrastructure support including legal, operational, administrative, and financial resources. The foundation is also able to ensure that VuFind is owned by the VuFind community and is able to expand beyond the interests of any single entity….”

Books Contain Multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing (2022 update) | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Books Contain Multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing is a three-part research and scoping report created to support the Experimental Publishing and Reuse Work Package (WP 6) of the COPIM project. It also serves as a resource for the scholarly community, especially for authors and publishers interested in pursuing more experimental forms of book publishing. This is the second version of this report (you can find the first version here), which includes feedback from our community, updates, as well as new additions to predominantly sections 2 (typology) and 3 (workflows, tools, and platforms). For this second version of Books Contain Multitudes we have pulled in resources from another research report we have previously published on reuse and interaction with open access books, from a series of Twitter threads that we have shared online, and from feedback received over this past year on the first version of this report. The resources from this research report and the Twitter threads as well as the feedback received are now incorporated in section 3 of this report.

COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is a 3-year project led by Coventry University as part of an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access (OA) book publishers and infrastructure providers and is funded by The Research England Development Fund and Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. COPIM is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable OA book publishing to flourish, delivering major improvements in the infrastructures used by OA book publishers and those publishers making a transition to OA. The project addresses the key technological, structural, and organisational hurdles—around funding, production, dissemination, discovery, reuse, and archiving—that are standing in the way of the wider adoption and impact of OA books. COPIM will realign OA book publishing away from competing commercial service providers to a more horizontal and cooperative knowledge-sharing approach.

As part of seven connected Work Packages, COPIM will work on 1) integrated capacity-building amongst presses; 2) access to and development of consortial, institutional, and other funding channels; 3) development and piloting of appropriate business models; 4) cost reductions achieved by economies of scale; 5) mutually supportive governance models; 6) integration into library, repository, and digital learning environments; 7) the re-use of and experimentation with OA books; 8) the effective and robust archiving of OA content; and 9) knowledge transfer to stakeholders through various pilots.

In the Experimental Publishing and Reuse Work Package we are looking at ways to more closely align existing software, tools and technologies, workflows and infrastructures for experimental publishing with the workflows of OA book publishers. To do so, we have produced a set of pilot projects of experimental books, which are being developed with the aid of these new tools and workflows and integrated into COPIM’s infrastructures. As part of these pilot projects, relationships have been established with open source publishing platforms, software providers, and projects focused on experimental long-form publications and outreach activities have been and will be conducted with OA book publishers and authors to further promote experimental publishing opportunities. We have also explored how non-experimental OA books are (re)used by the scholarly community. As such, we have examined those technologies and cultural strategies that are most effective in promoting OA book content interaction and reuse. This includes building communities around content and collections via annotations, comments, and post-publication review (e.g., via the social annotation platform hypothes.is) to enable more collaborative forms of knowledge production. To achieve this, we have mapped both existing technological solutions as well as cultural barriers and best practices with respect to reuse as part of a research report on Promoting and Nurturing Interactions with Open Access Books: Strategies for Publishers and Authors.

We are also producing an online resource and toolkit, or Compendium, to promote and support the publication of experimental books. The ExPub Compendium will be an online resource which provides an easy-to-browse catalogue of experimental publishing tools, practices, examples of experimental books, and the relationships between them. This report has been produced to support b

How Smart is the SMART Copyright Act? – Diff

“During March 2022, United States Senators Patrick Leahy and Thom Tillis introduced the Strengthening Measures to Advance Rights Technologies Copyright Act of 2022 (SMART Copyright Act). The bill is deceptively simple. It would require the Library of Congress to mandate that online platforms use certain “technical measures” (i.e., automated systems) to identify infringing content. Its simplicity masks its dangers, however. For that reason, though the Wikimedia Foundation agrees that technical measures to identify potentially infringing works can be useful in some circumstances, we sent a letter (reproduced below) on 19th April 2022 to the bill’s sponsors letting them know that we oppose it. 

Under the SMART Copyright Act, the Foundation and Wikimedia communities could be forced to accommodate and implement technical tools to identify and manage copyrighted content that may not be right for Wikimedia projects. This requirement could force the Foundation to change its existing copyright review process, even though the current process is working very well. …

While we fully agree that tools can be a helpful aid in identifying infringement, they should not be considered as a fix for all enforcement problems. There are two main reasons for this:

Technical tools are not good at determining when a work was “fairly used” or when a work has entered the public domain. This flaw leads to inappropriate censorship. Even YouTube’s Content ID identifies numerous false positives for infringement, and fails to catch a significant amount of problematic content. We worry that such tools would do far worse than the Wikipedia non-free content policy enforced by users.
Technical tools are often developed and owned by one company, and are not open source or freely available. If specific tools are mandated by the copyright office, this would make it difficult for smaller companies and nonprofits to use them without becoming overly reliant on those companies….”

FFII | Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure information on software patents, enforcement of IP, trade agreements

“The Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII) is a European alliance defending your right to free and competitive software creation since 1999. We are working towards the mitigation of legal risks in software development. We do so by keeping software free from patents and promoting a digital infrastructure based on genuine open standards and free and open hardware and software.

The FFII famously made a difference to prevent a EU software patent directive and continues to shed light on the schemes of the patent system to enter the software sphere and detach itself from democratic and fiscal oversight. One recent example is the Unified Patent Court (UPC). A specialised court which fences patent reforms off. We rely on networking with the European Parliament members and partners from industry and civil society. Its work won the FFII the Outstanding contribution to software development prize by CNET….”

Next Generation Library Publishing and Janeway Systems Launch Pilot with Five Library Publishers | Educopia Institute

“Library-based publishers at the Claremont Colleges, Clemson University, the University of Arizona, the University of New Orleans, and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will test the Next Generation Library Publishing (NGLP) project’s open source infrastructure as part of a pilot launching this month. The pilot, led by Janeway Systems, will provide a turnkey solution that combines journal and IR publishing with end-to-end services, empowering library publishers to grow their programs through open source software tailored to their needs….”

Goodbye, world! OER World Map Blog

The North-Rhine Westphalian Library Service Centre (hbz) will cease operating the OER World Map on 2022-04-29. We would like to thank all those who have supported and promoted the project in recent years. hbz will provide an appropriate solution for archiving the collected data. The software and data are openly licensed, so it is possible to continue operating the platform. If you are interested in continuing to operate the OER World Map, please do not hesitate to contact us at info@oerworldmap.org.