Dr. Trevor Owens Wins 2021 Core/OCLC Kilgour Research Award | News and Press Center

“Dr. Trevor Owens has been selected as the recipient of the 2021 Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology, sponsored by OCLC and Core: Leadership, Infrastructure, Futures. He is the Head of Digital Content Management at The Library of Congress.

The Kilgour Award honors research relevant to the development of information technologies, especially work which shows promise of having a positive and substantive impact on any aspect(s) of the publication, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information, or the processes by which information and data are manipulated and managed. It recognizes a body of work probably spanning years, if not the majority of a career. The winner receives $2,000, and a citation.

Owens is being recognized for his work on the Zotero project, a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded study on the potential for text mining and data visualization tools for historical scholarship, the Viewshare collection visualization platform, and how he is reimagining the Library of Congress as a platform for the acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of digital materials of all types. He has also written several essential titles, including Designing Online Communities: How Designers, Developers, Community Managers, and Software Structure Discourse and Knowledge Production on the Web and The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation: An Introduction, as well as dozens of journal articles, book chapters, conference proceedings, keynote presentations, and invited lectures. Through his pioneering work and leadership, he has helped change the understanding of information technology and its transformative application to libraries, especially around digital materials and strategies for access to, preservation of, and tools for maximizing use of them….”

Supporing MIT’s wider mission through OpenCourseWare | by MIT Open Learning | MIT Open Learning | Jun, 2021 | Medium

“When Abhay Parekh, who earned his doctorate in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1992, first heard of MIT OpenCourseWare, he immediately recognized the potential of the program. “Having grown up in India, I didn’t really feel as a high school student that I had access to all the information that I wanted. If I had the opportunity to take advantage of something like OpenCourseWare I would have had way more fun learning.”

Parekh became an early supporter and member of the OCW External Advisory Board in the early 2000s, directing his gift to help establish a pipeline of faculty contributions from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) department to the OCW platform. He quickly saw the value of video and multimedia for students and independent learners alike coming to the OCW site.

Today, Parekh is an Adjunct Professor of EECS at U.C. Berkeley, and still an avid user of OCW. As part of our 20th anniversary, we asked him to look back on his experience with OCW over the years, and why it still matters for learners and alumni today….”

How Academic Pirate Alexandra Elbakyan Is Fighting Scientific Misinformation

“In the decade since Alexandra Elbakyan founded Sci-Hub, science’s so-called “pirate queen” has amassed more than 85 million full-text research articles, which she’s made available, for free, to anyone who can track down her custom search engine. …

In the swirling chaos of the pandemic—and a new, or at least newly-acknowledged, era of digital disinformation—Sci-Hub kicked into overdrive. Its number of daily users has grown 20 percent, from 500,000 to 600,000, according to Elbakyan. During lockdown, people accessed articles about COVID-19 10 to 100 times more often than articles about other diseases. …”

Mercè Crosas, de Harvard a secretària de Transparència i Govern Obert | exterior

From Google’s English:  “After 17 years at Harvard University (United States), Mercè Crosas Navarro has been appointed Secretary of Transparency and Open Government, which belongs to the Department of Foreign Action and Transparency of the Catalan government. Until now he had served as head of research data management at Harvard University and head of the office of data science and technology at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science.”

Open access books in the humanities | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Humanities book authors value the benefits that publishing open access can bring. Open access books are easy to find and share, allowing for authors to increase the real-world impact of their work.

Open access can support authors’ desires to increase interdisciplinary discussion and use of their work, and to reach a larger and broader audience outside of their normal networks to students, policymakers and the general public. Publishing an open access academic book can also help with career advancement. 

On this page you can find interviews with some of our featured book authors talking about their experiences of publishing open access, as well as open access book highlights from our Humanities list (History, Literature, Culture and Media Studies, Religion and Philosophy). Open access funding can sometimes be challenging to find, so you can also find a list of some of the funders who have supported our featured books, and information on our free Funding Support Service….”

Zeineb Yousif | Movers & Shakers 2021–Digital Developers | Library Journal

“Yousif was hired as the inaugural digital initiatives librarian at the Chester Fritz Library at the University of North Dakota (UND) in 2016, tasked with getting their institutional repository (IR) off the ground and promoting open access to scholarly resources. Under her leadership, UND’s IR has compiled nearly 30,000 digital objects, including theses and dissertations, research data sets, and a complete inventory of the university’s art collection. Work has begun on 3-D scanning more than 40,000 fossils for the geology department. Yousif also develops policies and guides for the IR, manages digitization projects, and works on digital exhibitions….”

Experience of using CORE Recommender – an interview – Research

“Making the repository experience more rewarding for users is a continual endeavour for repository managers, and the CORE Recommender is designed to provide a simple and fast solution to help researchers discover relevant further reading. The CORE Recommender is a plugin for repositories, journals and web interfaces that provides article suggestions closely related to the articles that the user is actively reading.  The source of recommended data is the base of CORE, which consists of over 25 million full texts from CORE….”

Experience of using CORE Recommender – CORE

“CORE Recommender is a plugin for repositories, journals and web interfaces that provides suggestions on relevant articles to the article a user is looking for. The source of recommended data is the base of CORE, which consists of over 25 million full texts from CORE. Today we have interviewed George Macgregor, Scholarly Publications & Research Data Manager at the University of Strathclyde, responsible for the Strathprints institutional repository.  Read about his experience of using CORE Recommender on the Jisc Research blog….”

„Wir müssen in Fachdisziplinen denken, um mehr Titel und Programme im Open Access zu ermöglichen“ | Open Research Community

From Google’s English:  “The financing model “wbv Open Library,” which the publisher and Knowledge Unlatched have jointly launched, is oriented towards the disciplines of adult education and professional and business education. This interview is about the framework that had to be defined, about pricing, planning processes – but also about the fun it is to try something new. Your goal: to provide the funding institutions and libraries with discipline-oriented access to Open Access publications….”

News – Rose Harris-Birtill Appointed as Acting Director of Open Library of Humanities

“We are pleased to announce that Dr Rose Harris-Birtill, currently Managing Editor, has been appointed as Acting Director of the Open Library of Humanities, beginning 1st June 2021. She steps in to replace Professor Martin Paul Eve, who will be taking research leave in Autumn 2021 and Spring 2022.

Dr Harris-Birtill has considerable experience with OLH as the senior figure who oversees editorial processes at the organization. Dr Harris-Birtill has a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of St Andrews, where she is also an Honorary Teaching and Research Fellow in the School of English. Her academic monograph, David Mitchell’s Post-Secular World: Buddhism, Belief and the Urgency of Compassion (2019, Bloomsbury Academic) brings together post-secular literary fiction and Buddhist philosophies, investigating the redeployment of Buddhist influences across the complete fictions of author David Mitchell. This study also broadens to investigate a wider resurgence of post-secular narrative worlds in contemporary literature, discussing Mitchell’s works alongside those of Michael Ondaatje, Ali Smith, Yann Martel, Will Self and Margaret Atwood….”

(PDF) A Critical Conversation with Alexandra Elbakyan: Is she the Pirate Queen, Robin Hood, a Scholarly Activist, or a Butterfly Flapping its Wings?

Abstract:  The conversation with Alexandra Elbakyan intends to explore the Sci-Hub phenomenon and the core motives that initiated Sci-Hub. Accordingly, Sci-Hub is an open science project that has gone viral and is driven by people who pursue knowledge. The core idea behind the Sci-Hub is very simple: people should have access to knowledge without any restrictions. Elbakyan argues that science should be ruled by the scientist, not by the corporations. It is here, in a publish or perish scholarly world, that Sci-Hub aims to give control back to scientists and empower them. Elbakyan claims that for-profit corporations are gatekeeping knowledge, whereas Sci-Hub is disseminating it for the greater good. The conversation with Elbakyan about Sci-Hub raises a critical question for us to answer: Who is the real owner of the information?

FBI Got Access To Sci-Hub Founder’s Apple Account | Techdirt

“The war against educating people without paying huge sums of money continues without pause. Over the last few years, we’ve written a bunch about Sci-Hub and its founder, Alexandra Elbakyan, including the fact that academic publishers have convinced the DOJ to investigate Elbakyan, claiming that this effort to (*checks notes*) give more academics free access to academic articles is… tied to Russian intelligence. The whole thing seemed bizarre. Sure, fine, people can make arguments about copyright — but saying that it’s connected to Russian intelligence seems like quite a conspiracy theory.

Either way, it appears that the “investigation” continues along. TorrentFreak alerts us that Apple has informed Elbakyan that the FBI now has access to her Apple account. …”

Conversation with Philip Hess, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel  Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

“In today’s episode we feature an interview of Philip Hess, Head of Publisher Relations, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society.  The interview was conducted by Matthew Ismail, Director of Collection Development, University of Central Michigan. 

We’ll hear from Philip and Marcel about a German OA project that focuses on supporting small, non-APC, scholar-led journals. It’s a Knowledge Unlatched and Humboldt University project.

Philipp Hess is currently the Head of Publisher Relations at Knowledge Unlatched and is pursuing a complimentary master’s degree at the University of St. Gallen and the University of Arts Berlin in Leadership in digital Innovation. Before that he studied Engineering and Industrial Design in the Netherlands and Japan, before getting into scholarly content while working in the Management Department for Kiron, a platform that offers higher education to refugees. His goal is to make knowledge accessible to everyone, everywhere and to help shape the future dissemination of scholarly content.

Marcel Wrzesinski is an Open Access Officer at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society and works in the research project “Sustainable journal financing through consortial support structures in small and interdisciplinary subjects” (in cooperation with Knowledge Unlatched). Prior to this, he led Open Access activities at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (Giessen) and developed transformation strategies for gender studies at Freie Universität (Berlin). He is an editor of two open access journals, headed various working groups on digital publishing, and advises research institutions on Open Access and Open Science. His interests lie in fostering and sustaining Open Access in smaller and interdisciplinary fields….”

Tilting the balance back towards libraries | Research Information

Jason Priem tells of his hopes for a ‘long-overdue’ change in academic publishing.

“This presents a compelling opportunity for us as OA advocates: by helping libraries quantify the alternatives to toll-access publishing, we can empower librarians to cancel multi-million dollar big deals. This in turn will begin to turn off the faucet of money flowing from universities to toll-access publishing houses. In short: by helping libraries cancel big deals, we can make toll-access publishing less profitable, and accelerate the transition toward universal OA.”

After the Pandemic: Has Medical Research Been Changed Forever? | MedPage Today

“medRxiv has been a terrific help to the scientific community during the pandemic. It has sped the communication of science and fostered interactions among scientists around the world. It is an open and rapid way to share pre-peer reviewed studies. For the most part, people seemed to have quickly realized that this is science in progress, and not to take it as truth — but as work open for comment. It has embedded the preprint culture in a way that I hope will be sustained and spread.

I am not aware of any harm that has accrued and I am aware that many good interactions have resulted from the sharing of the information. And it is certainly better than science by press release alone. Also, importantly, our screening process is intended to protect the public’s interest — safeguarding privacy, promoting registration, requiring ethics approval, and ensuring that dangerous claims are avoided….”