Guest Post — The Efficacy of ChatGPT: Is it Time for the Librarians to Go Home?

In preparation for a presentation, Curtis Kendrick tried ChatGPT to see what it (they?) had to say. The results at first seemed credible, but where ChatGPT failed miserably was in the non-existent citations it provided.

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Why PID Strategies Are Having A Moment — And Why You Should Care

Why are national PID strategies having a moment, and why should you care? Find out in today’s post by Alice Meadows.

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The Dangers of Automation: Keep Your Pokemon-playing Fish Away from Your Credit Cards

A YouTuber sets up a system where the swimming patterns of his fish let them “play” Pokemon online. What could possibly go wrong?

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Guest Post – AI and Scholarly Publishing: A View from Three Experts

A recap of a recent SSP webinar on artificial intelligence (AI) and scholarly publishing. How can this set of technologies help or harm scholarly publishing, and what are some current trends? What are the risks of AI, and what should we look out for?

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Thoughts on AI’s Impact on Scholarly Communications? An Interview with ChatGPT

An interview with ChatGPT on issues related to scholarly communication.

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Guest Post — Publishers Should Be Transparent About the Capabilities and Limitations of Software They Use to Detect Image Manipulation or Duplication

The STM Integrity Hub will include software to detect image manipulation and duplication. It is important that the effectiveness of the software be evaluated in a transparent process.

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GitHub is Sued, and We May Learn Something About Creative Commons Licensing

GitHub and Microsoft are being sued for using open source software without creator attribution in alleged violation of open licensing requirements. What implications does this have for the scholarly literature and Creative Commons licenses?

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Research Integrity and Reproducibility are Two Aspects of the Same Underlying Issue – A Report from STM Week 2022

Observations on reproducibility and research integrity from London STM Week

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Unnecessary Research Bureaucracy is Killing Academic Productivity, But it IS Fixable

Research bureaucracy and administrative burden has become so overpowering that many researchers are reporting that they don’t have time to do any research anymore. Phill Jones argues that technology in the form of PIDs will go a long way to fixing this.

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A Failure to Communicate: Indicators of Open Access in the User Interface

Though open access indicators within a given publishing platform are relatively consistent, significant inconsistency across platforms likely creates user confusion.

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A History of Encabulation — Advancements From the Turbo Encabulator and the Retro Encabulator Have Led to the Hyper Encabulator

Significant breakthroughs in jargon have enabled the development of the hyper encabulator, sure to serve all your encabulation needs.

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Guest Post – Wikipedia’s Citations Are Influencing Scholars and Publishers

Rachel Helps, the Wikipedian-in-residence at the BYU libraries discusses the intersection of scholarly journals and Wikipedia.

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