Celebrating 25 Years of Preserving the Web

Since 1996, the Internet Archive has been capturing the World Wide Web but also doing so much more to preserve our digital world behind the scenes.

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Where Does Enhancement End and Citation Begin?

As more publishers semantically enrich documents, Todd Carpenter considers whether links are the same as citations

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Transforming Scholarly Publishing With Blockchain Technologies and AI: An Interview with Darrell Gunter

Today we feature an interview with Darrell W. Gunter, the editor of a new book on Transforming Scholarly Publishing With Blockchain Technologies and AI.

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Guest Post — Fifty Shades of Hybrid Conferences: Why Publishers Should Care (and How You Can Help)

Since in-person events are likely not going away, and neither are virtual ones, conference organizers are left with the most complex of options: hybrid. How can scholarly publishers help?

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Start-up Stories: Cassyni — The One-Stop-Shop for Online Seminars — Or, How to Get Your Product Built and Launched in 6 Months

Continuing a series looking at start-ups in the scholarly sector, from what they do and how it could be useful, to how they have got started, and tips they would share with other entrepreneurs. This time, an interview with Andrew Preston and Ben Kaube, two of the founders of online seminar platform Cassyni

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Revisiting: Theory of the E-book

Joe Esposito revisits his 2012 post on the unstated theory of the e-book, which assumes that a book consists only of its text and can be manipulated without regard to the nature and circumstances of its creation. This is only one theory of many, but it is now the prevailing one.

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Pearson Launches a Comprehensive Textbook Solution for Students. What Are Its Prospects?

Pearson is offering online access to its entire textbook collection for $15 a month. Will students go for it?

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Revisiting — The Google Generation Is Alright

How much has changed in a dozen years? Lettie Conrad looks back at Ann Michael’s post from the 2009 SSP Annual Meeting, “Publishing for the Google Generation”.

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Making the Case for a PID-Optimized World

In the second of two posts on persistent identifiers in scholarly communications, Phill Jones and Alice Meadows share information about a new cost-benefit analysis showing the value of widespread PID adoption

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