Experimenting with repository workflows for archiving: Automated ingest | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Ross Higman

In a recent post, my colleague Miranda Barnes outlined the challenges of archiving and preservation for small and scholar-led open access publishers, and described the process of manually uploading books to the Loughborough University institutional repository. The conclusion of this manual ingest experiment was that while university repositories offer a potential route for open access archiving of publisher output, the manual workflow is prohibitively time- and resource-intensive, particularly for small and scholar-led presses who are often stretched in these respects.

Fortunately, many institutional repositories provide routes for uploading files and metadata which allow for the process to be automated, as an alternative to the standard web browser user interface. Different repositories offer different routes, but a large proportion of them are based on the same technologies. By experimenting with a handful of repositories, we were therefore able to investigate workflows which should also be applicable to a much broader spread of institutions.

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OPEN SCIENCE INITIATIVES: THE POSTPRINT PLEDGE

“• Is it legal to post “postprints” online? • Depends on each publisher’s policies • We compiled a list of 60 Applied Linguistics journals (from Web of Science) • Examined their copyright policies from Sherpa Romeo (https://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/) • Publishers that permit postprints: • Cambridge, Elsevier, John Benjamins, SAGE, Emerald, De Gruyter, Akadémiai Kiadó • Publisher that permit postprints on personal websites only (embargo on repositories): • Springer, Oxford University Press, Taylor & Francis • Publishers that do NOT permit on postprints before an embargo period: • Wiley (usually 24-month embargo)…

What this Pledge is NOT asking you to do: • Does not ask you to break any laws. Sharing postprints is within your rights (see table next slide). • Does not ask you to share “preprints” but to share “postprints”. • Does not limit you to publishing in these journals. • Does not require you do anything else (like boycotting certain publishers or not reviewing for them)….” 

The Company of Biologists supplies articles to Publications Router – Research

“The Company of Biologists, a leading not-for-profit publisher, is now providing full-text articles for distribution to UK institutional repositories using Jisc’s Publications Router service….

The articles are provided daily, upon first publication of the version of record. This is nearly always within seven weeks of acceptance.

 

Publications Router matches the articles to the authors’ institutions and delivers them into their repositories automatically, together with rich, authoritative metadata….”

Texas ScholarWorks Marks a Milestone | TexLibris

“UT Libraries is excited to announce that Texas ScholarWorks (TSW) has crossed the 100,000 item threshold!…

Texas ScholarWorks (formerly the University of Texas Digital Repository) was created to provide open, online access to the products of the University’s research and scholarship, preserve these works for future generations, promote new models of scholarly communication and deepen community understanding of the value of higher education….”

 

Publications Router is now interoperable with Worktribe – Research

“Publications Router, the Jisc service that captures research articles from publishers and distributes them to UK institutional repositories, is now fully interoperable with Worktribe, the cloud-based platform for higher education administration….

If you use Worktribe’s Outputs product, you can receive articles that Router has matched to your institution– including the full text from a growing range of publishers – directly and seamlessly into your system. They can then be reviewed and approved by the authors and repository management staff before public release using your usual procedures.

This has been tried out by a group of pilot institutions. Working with Jisc, Worktribe have now added further improvements to the integration, and both organizations are now ready to offer it to institutions for live use….”

Springer Nature asked to revise application for its titles to become Jisc-approved transformative journals | Jisc

“Springer Nature has been asked to revise and resubmit an application for its Nature Research Journals and Palgrave Journals to become Jisc-approved transformative journals.

In its application, made on 14 April 2022, Springer Nature offered deposit of an author’s accepted manuscript (AAM) under CC-BY terms to authors funded by UKRI for a temporary period.  

Following a?review by the content expert group against the sector’s requirements it was agreed that the application did not currently meet the sector’s criteria. This is because the information presented to authors does not?equally signpost the option to deposit the AAM alongside the option to publish the Version of Record and pay an article processing charge (APC)….”

Depositing Data: A Usability Study of the Texas Data Repository

Abstract:  Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the usability of the Texas Data Repository (TDR) for the data depositors who are unfamiliar with its interface and use the results to improve user experience.

Methods: This mixed-method research study collected qualitative and quantitative data through a pre-survey, a task-oriented usability test with a think-aloud protocol, and an exit questionnaire. Analysis of the quantitative (i.e., descriptive statistics) and qualitative data (e.g., content analysis of the thinking-aloud protocols) were employed to examine the TDR’s usability for first-time data depositors at Texas A&M University.

Results: While the study revealed that the users were generally satisfied with their experience, the data suggest that a majority of the participants had difficulty understanding the difference between a dataverse collection and dataset, and often found adding or editing metadata overwhelming. The platform’s tiered model for metadata description is core to its function, but many participants did not have an accurate mental model of the platform, which left them scrolling up and down the page or jumping back and forth between different tabs and pages to perform a single task. Based on the results, the authors made some recommendations.

Conclusions: While this paper relies heavily on the context of the Harvard Dataverse repository platform, the authors posit that any self-deposit model, regardless of platform, could benefit from these recommendations. We noticed that completing various metadata fields in the TDR required participants to pivot their mindset from a data creator to that of a data curator. Moreover, the methods used to investigate the usability of the repository can be used to develop additional studies in a variety of repository and service model contexts. 

Determinants of research output submission in institutional repositories by faculty members in Nigerian universities | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

This paper aims to determine and analyze the rate of content submission by lecturers in relation to type of university, discipline, academic qualification, rank and teaching experience and identified the determinants of research output submission by faculty members in Nigerian varsities.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was conducted in six universities with functional institutional repositories in Southern Nigeria. Data collated through questionnaire from the university lecturers were analyzed using frequency distribution, percentages and regression analysis.

Findings

Results showed that submission of research output was higher for lecturers in Social Sciences than for those in the Sciences; the highest among those with doctorate degree, senior lecturers and those with 6–10?years of teaching experience. The rank of faculty members and the type of university were significant determinants of research output submission.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was limited to universities in Southern Nigeria with functional institutional repositories. There should be further investigations on same study in universities with functional institutional repositories in other regions in Nigeria.

Practical implications

Increased submission rate by faculty members will sustain the institutional repositories.

Social implications

Faculty members get in contact, make friends and engage in collaborative research.

Originality/value

This report contributes to the global knowledge and communication’s field through the provision of empirical evidence on the determinants of content submission in open access institutional repositories.

Emerald supplies accepted manuscripts to Publications Router – Research

“Emerald, the global publisher of social science research, is now supplying accepted manuscripts of journal articles to Jisc’s Publications Router service for onward distribution to UK institutional repositories….”

Using R packages to populate IR

“Many institutions have reported that participation rates of article deposit in their IR are low regardless of their various efforts in outreach and engagement. Even when the deposit is mandated, the participation rate can still be quite low.

Once this hurdle was overcome, there is another challenge faced by the IR administrators, ensuring that the version submitted by the researcher is the appropriate version. If it is not, IR administrators would need to take additional steps to correspond with the researcher to obtain the appropriate version. Thus, increasing their administrative work load.

Therefore, some institutions had taken the pro-active initiative to complete the deposit on behalf of their researchers. This certainly is not a small undertaking. However, there are openly available R packages (https://ropensci.org/) that can be used to automate some of the processes. In this page, I will summarize the steps to do that….”

Reaping the benefits of open science in scholarly communication: Heliyon

Abstract:  Regardless of multiple efforts carried out across many countries to disseminate the ideas and the practice of open science, most scholars in the early 2020s do not self-archive their research articles and do not publish research papers in preprint form. Having received no education and training on open science, researchers are often puzzled on what to do, in practice, to start reaping the benefits of open science. This study offers a succinct vademecum on how to benefit from the open science approach to scholarly communication, no matter whether in natural or in humanistic and social sciences.

 

New deposit obligation as of 1 January 2022 – Open Science

“As of 1 January 2022 the KU Leuven deposit obligation has been extended: in addition to journal articles, KU Leuven authors are now also required to deposit in Lirias a full text of every book chapter and conference proceeding they publish. Uploading the full texts of other publication types is strongly encouraged. When you select the ‘public access’ license, the Open Access Support Desk will monitor the publisher’s OA policy and the Belgian OA legislation and will apply the correct accessibility. …”

Moving into a new house: FSU Libraries updates and improves Research Repository – FSULIB

“In the Summer of 2021, FSU Libraries migrated DigiNole: FSU’s Digital Repository to a new home that is completely hosted and maintained by Florida State University. DigiNole: FSU’s Digital Repository  features FSU’s theses and dissertations, open access research and digitized archival collections. DigiNole is Florida State University’s unified platform for FSU-created and maintained digital resources providing access to a wide range of different materials in the Digital Library and Research Repository.

The transition between site hosts involved a complex, multi-layered process. This transition took two years to complete, beginning in the planning stages and ending at the time of public launch July 15, 2021. Users will notice better responsiveness to mobile devices, a more elegant interface, and better overall site performance. Users are also able to directly download video and audio files from records which is a functionality available in the new system.

Since the launch of the upgrade system on July 15, 2021, the Libraries’ internal Working Group began exploring new features such as a 3D object viewer and integrating ORCID as part of a new repository submission process. The internal group is also working on ADA compliant enhancements to ensure the accessibility for theses and dissertations. Additionally, audiovisual items will display closed captions streams.

FSU faculty, staff, students and postdocs are invited to submit research outputs such as articles, book chapters, reports, datasets, and posters to the Research Repository to make them publicly available at no cost to the author. Library workers are available to assist in compliance with copyright, publisher policies and the FSU Faculty Senate Open Access Policy….”

FAPESP reformulates its policy of open access to publications | AGÊNCIA FAPESP

“FAPESP [Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo] has reformulated its open-access policy, implemented in 2008, according to which scientific papers originating in research projects funded by it and approved for publication must be deposited in institutional repositories. Ordinance no. 37, issued on October 27 by FAPESP’s Executive Board (CTA), now mandates open access within 12 months of publication.

With the establishment of a deadline, it will be possible to verify compliance with FAPESP’s open-access mandate on the part of researchers it supports, using such tools as Google Scholar, which tracks whether research papers covered by funders’ public-access mandates are free to read. FAPESP expects this measure to enhance the visibility of the research it funds, and to increase the scientific, economic and social impact of published papers.

Researchers who are unable to comply for legal or contractual reasons must advise FAPESP of this impediment and justify it in the scientific reports required for the grants or scholarships associated with the publications, or via the contact section Converse com a FAPESP.”