Coleridge Initiative – Show US the Data | Kaggle

“This competition challenges data scientists to show how publicly funded data are used to serve science and society. Evidence through data is critical if government is to address the many threats facing society, including; pandemics, climate change, Alzheimer’s disease, child hunger, increasing food production, maintaining biodiversity, and addressing many other challenges. Yet much of the information about data necessary to inform evidence and science is locked inside publications.

Can natural language processing find the hidden-in-plain-sight data citations? Can machine learning find the link between the words used in research articles and the data referenced in the article?

Now is the time for data scientists to help restore trust in data and evidence. In the United States, federal agencies are now mandated to show how their data are being used. The new Foundations of Evidence-based Policymaking Act requires agencies to modernize their data management. New Presidential Executive Orders are pushing government agencies to make evidence-based decisions based on the best available data and science. And the government is working to respond in an open and transparent way.

This competition will build just such an open and transparent approach. …”

CHORUS FORUM RECAP: New Connections: Research Data to Content – CHORUS

“DataCite connects PIDs in standardized ways to maximize access to outputs via researcher repositories, institutions, or funders, for discovery and impact assessment. DataCite Commons, a web search interface for the metadata and PIDs associated with research publications and data (Crossref, DataCite), people (ORCID), and research organizations (RoR) was launched last year. DataCite maps these related identifiers in a PID Graph. By advancing and surfacing relationships (e.g., authorship, affiliation, reuse), the PID Graph helps follow the trail of research from dataset, to article, to institution, and so on. It thereby enables discovery through these connections, leverages usage and citations, and enables impact assessment.

With this infrastructure in place, additional metadata contributions will improve reuse and discovery. Adding rights information, for example, will help researchers and harvesters learn if they can reuse the data. Adding abstracts and other descriptive information will enable mining for emerging trends without singling out controlled vocabulary terms. Putting data citations in structured form makes them machine readable, which creates the potential for scaling up on a massive scale, through artificial intelligence (AI) applications….”

CHORUS now using GetFTR to support open research compliance for publicly funded research – CHORUS

“CHORUS (chorusaccess.org), the non-profit membership organization, is now using Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) technology to speed up and enhance their open research audit process.

CHORUS is applying the GetFTR API to further automate the gathering and checking of key data on journal articles and conference proceedings from multiple publishers, supporting the organization’s mission of advancing sustainable, cost-effective public access to content reporting on research funded by public organizations. For GetFTR, this means its technology is being used in increasingly innovative ways to support the discovery of research….

The GetFTR service is now being used by six publishers and eight integrating partners, including CHORUS, Dimensions, Figshare, Mendeley, Papers and the Researcher app.”

CHORUS and DataCite sign MOU to advance linking and discoverability – CHORUS

“CHORUS and DataCite have signed a two-year Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to coordinate efforts to adopt identifiers and standards to manage access to and reporting of research outputs.

Authoritative connections between researchers and their works, funding sources, and affiliations, are essential for delivering public access to scholarly content. As not-for-profit organizations engaged in supporting discoverability in scholarly communications, both DataCite and CHORUS have an important contribution to make creating and supporting these links.

The organizations commit to dialog and cooperation on the following topics:

Supporting simple and non-ambiguous links between datasets, researchers and their funding
Displaying links between CHORUS content and DataCite DOIs in the CHORUS dashboards and reports
Building awareness of DataCite services among funding agency researchers and administrators
Encouraging the use of persistent identifiers for researchers and organizations to support public access to research works …”

Recap of the CHORUS Forum on Open Access Policies and Compliance in a Global Context – CHORUS

“Over 150 publishers (society, commercial, and university press), librarians, funders, service providers, university administrators, faculty, and researchers attended the virtual CHORUS Forum on Open Access Policies and Compliance in a Global Context on 30 July 2020. CHORUS Chairman Alix Vance (AIP Publishing CEO) kicked off the day by welcoming participants and introducing speakers.

Watch Forum Video Now

Here’s a summary of the program’s presentations:…”

Collaborating for public access to scholarly publications: A case study of the partnership between the US Department of Energy and CHORUS – Dylla – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

The success of the CHORUS and DOE relationship is the result of nearly two decades of interactions between the DOE and a group of scientific publishers.
The relationship between CHORUS and the US federal agencies required understanding of different motivations, operations, and philosophies.
Although achieving public access was simple in principle, it required considerable effort to develop systems that satisfied all parties.
Publishers had been working with federal agencies to achieve open access before the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but this helped to create a path for a more fruitful relationship….”

Collaborating for public access to scholarly publications: A case study of the partnership between the US Department of Energy and CHORUS – Dylla – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

The success of the CHORUS and DOE relationship is the result of nearly two decades of interactions between the DOE and a group of scientific publishers.
The relationship between CHORUS and the US federal agencies required understanding of different motivations, operations, and philosophies.
Although achieving public access was simple in principle, it required considerable effort to develop systems that satisfied all parties.
Publishers had been working with federal agencies to achieve open access before the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but this helped to create a path for a more fruitful relationship….”

How University of Denver Librarians used CHORUS Institution Dashboards in conjunction with their own internal data to help monitor public accessibility to the University’s publicly funded research

“In his role as Dean of the University of Denver Libraries, Professor Levine-Clark had been grappling with a problem his librarian audience understood all too well — that monitoring public access to federally funded research had reached a critical point. By 2017, D.U.’s steadily growing research budget was approaching $30 million. Professor Levine-Clark knew that a considerable portion of this money came from various government agencies, representing a risk to future funding. He also knew that using the Library’s two and a half full-time developers to build and maintain a D.U. technical solution would take up too much of their valuable time….”

CHORUS Signs Agreement With US Department of Defense to Advance Public Access to Research – CHORUS

“CHORUS, a non-profit organization, announced an agreement with the US Department of Defense (DoD) through its Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) as part of the agency’s continued commitment to expand public access to the results of its funded research….”

Plan for Increased Public Access to Results of Federally Funded Research, August 18, 2015

“This document outlines the Smithsonian Institution’s plan to provide increased public access to certain peer-reviewed scholarly publications and supporting digital research data1 that arise from research funded, in whole or in part, by a federal funding source (hereinafter “Federally Funded Research Materials” or “FFRM”), consistent with the principles of access under the Office of Science and Technology Policy Memorandum dated February 22, 2013.2 This plan is effective as of October 1, 2015; only FFRM submitted for publication on or after the effective date shall be covered….”

Smithsonian Launches Public Access Plan for Research

“The Smithsonian has released its Plan for Increased Public Access to Results of Federally Funded Research, based on the principles outlined by the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Through the new plan, all applicable publications and supporting data resulting from federally funded research will be available through the Smithsonian Research Online (SRO) website or CHORUS, a nonprofit membership organization that helps federal entities increase public access to research. The plan will take effect Oct. 1 and apply to articles submitted to publishers on or after that date….”

SPARC responds to the Department of Energy’s Public Access Plan | SPARC

The [Obama] Administration has made open access a priority, and that is a huge step forward. The Department of Energy’s plan is the first opportunity we have to see how the Administration will deliver on this vision – and there are clearly mixed results. The DOE’s plan takes steps towards achieving the goals of the Directive, but falls short in some key areas. Most critically, the DOE plan does not adequately address the reuse rights that are necessary for the public to do more than simply access and read individual articles. Without clearly articulating these reuse rights, the public’s ability to download, analyze, text mine, data mine, and perform computational analysis on these articles is severely limited, and a crucial principle of the White House Directive cannot be fully realized….The DOE plan is a mixed bag in terms of ease of access….[W]e are concerned that the plan places too strong an emphasis on defaulting to versions of articles residing on publishers’ websites, where terms and conditions of use may be restricted. SPARC encourages DOE to ensure that articles are deposited into repositories immediately upon publication and are made available via channels where their reuse can be fully leveraged….