Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Navigating 21st-Century Digital Scholarship: Open Educational Resources (OERs), Creative Commons, Copyright, and Library Vendor Licenses: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  Digital scholarship issues are increasingly prevalent in today’s environment. We are faced with questions of how to protect our own works as well as others’ with responsible attribution and usage, sometimes involving a formal agreement. These may come in the form of Creative Commons Licensing, provisions of the U.S. Copyright Act, or terms of use outlined by contractual agreements with library vendors. Librarians at Eastern Carolina University and Kansas State University (K-State) are among several university libraries now providing services to assist with navigating these sometimes legalistic frameworks. East Carolina University Libraries are taking initiatives to familiarize faculty, researchers, and students with Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons Licensing. At K-State, librarians in digital scholarship and electronic resources identified the overlap of their subject matters through their correspondence regarding users’ copyright and licensing questions; a partnership formed, and they implemented a proactive and public-facing approach to better meet user needs and liability concerns at a major research university.

Join us for a Twitter chat! | Creative Commons USA

Next month, Creative Commons USA is hosting a Twitter chat in partnership with the Open Textbook Network, Rebus Community, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation, and Library Publishing Coalition around open licensing, CC, copyright, and other intellectual property issues.

We’re inviting practitioners from across the spectrum to join our experts – including Michael Carroll, a founding member of Creative Commons, currently a Professor of Law and the Director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, and Meredith Jacob, Public Lead for Creative Commons USA. Ethan Senack, Outreach and Policy Manager for Creative Commons USA (@esenack) will be moderating….”

Is it possible to decolonize the Commons? An interview with Jane Anderson of Local Contexts – Creative Commons

“Joining us at the Creative Commons Global Summit in 2018, NYU professor and legal scholar Jane Anderson presented the collaborative project “Local Contexts,” “an initiative to support Native, First Nations, Aboriginal, Inuit, Metis and Indigenous communities in the management of their intellectual property and cultural heritage specifically within the digital environment.” The wide-ranging panel touched on the need for practical strategies for Indigenous communities to reclaim their rights and assert sovereignty over their own intellectual property….

How can we have an open movement that works for everyone, not only the most powerful? How have power structures historically worked against Indigenous communities, and how can the Creative Commons community work to change this historic inequality?

Jane Anderson discussed these issues as well as some of her more recent work with the Passamaquoddy Tribe in Maine with Creative Commons….”

 

A Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain

Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Creative Commons, this celebration will feature a keynote addresses by Lawrence Lessig and Cory Doctorow, lightning talks, demos, multimedia displays and more to mark the “re-opening” of the public domain in the United States. The event will take place at the Internet Archive in San Francisco….”

Not Even Attribution | SteveFoerster.com

So why am I so enthusiastic about Creative Commons if I don’t use licenses that contain any of their legal clauses? For starters, because I cheerfully acknowledge that while I’m over on the radical end of the free culture movement, that doesn’t mean the bulk of that movement isn’t also doing great work moving society away from the notion that “all rights reserved” is the only approach to consider.

But also, when they were designing licenses, they didn’t leave people like me out. In addition to their suite of various licenses, they also designed the CC0 waiver, a way of disclaiming copyright to the maximum extent possible in as many jurisdictions as possible, thereby effectively placing it into the public domain, where I want my content to go. I am very grateful for their work to make that an option for me, and for those who are on the fence, I can report from here that I have never suffered any deleterious outcome from having chosen this path over any of the “some rights reserved” alternatives….”

Open and Shut? The OA Interviews: Arul George Scaria

One common criticism of the open access and open science movements is that they tend to take a standardised view of science and scholarship, and so propose one-size-fits-all approaches when advocating for ways of making research and the research process more open and transparent. This often poses significant challenges for, for instance, researchers in non-STEM disciplines. It is also often deeply problematic for those based in the global South.

Sharing new educational resources on open licensing for preprints – ASAPbio

“Today we’re happy to share two new documents that we hope will aid researchers in their decision to share early work as preprints. Even while the practice of publishing preprints continues to grow, we know from our community outreach that there are still lots of questions regarding open licensing options, including downstream publishing implications for preprints.

So, ASAPbio has worked with its expert committee to draft and share a set of resources. The first is a list of questions and answers that focuses on open licensing and preprints. The FAQ includes fundamental questions such as “Who holds the copyright in a manuscript?” but also digs into more specific questions related to preprints like “Does the act of posting a preprint transfer copyright or sign rights away to the preprint server provider?” and “Why should authors consider applying an open license to their preprints?” The purpose of the FAQ is to provide useful and descriptive information to authors about how Creative Commons and open licensing operates with regard to preprints and their downstream journal publications. We hope that the resource can help researchers feel more comfortable sharing preprints under open licenses, and thus open the door to early access and collaboration possibilities with others….”

If Open is the Answer, What Was the Question? | MIT Open Learning

“For 148 years, The Metropolitan Museum of Art has been connecting audiences to knowledge, creativity, and ideas through the 5,000 years of human history represented by The Met’s global collection. For the vast majority of those years, this mission-serving work was concentrated to within the walls of the museum’s Manhattan venues. Digital, and the digitization of collections, changed that.

Over the last decade, The Met has developed an ambitious digital program whose goal is to extend the reach and relevance of The Met collection to a global audience. One of the most significant milestones in the development of this program was the museum’s decision, in 2017, make all high-resolution images – approximately 375,000 images – of public-domain artworks available for users to use, share, mix and remix unrestricted, under CC0 (Creative Commons).

In this xTalk, Loic Tallon will review the reasoning for that decision, the impacts of it, and the larger role of open content in helping The Met become one of the most accessible and relevant cultural voices for the world and in the world….”

Better Sharing Through Licenses? Measuring the Influence of Creative Commons Licenses on the Usage of Open Access Monographs

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION Open Access and licenses are closely intertwined. Both Creative Commons (CC) and Open Access seek to restore the balance between the owners of creative works and prospective users. Apart from the legal issues around CC licenses, we could look at role of intermediaries whose work is enabled through CC licenses. Does licensing documents under Creative Commons increase access and reuse in a direct way, or is access and reuse amplified by intermediaries? OAPEN LIBRARY AND DOAB The OAPEN Library contains books available under both open licenses, for example Creative Commons, as well as books that are published under terms that only allow for personal use. The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) functions as an intermediary, offering aggregation services exclusively focused on books with an open license. METHODS Downloads are used as a proxy for the use of books in the OAPEN Library. The data set that this paper analyses data that was captured over a period of 33 months. During this time, 1734 different books were made available through the OAPEN Library: 855 books under a Creative Commons license and 879 books under a more restrictive regime. The influence of open licenses, aggregation in DOAB, and subject and language are evaluated. RESULTS Once the effects of subject and language are taken into account, there is no evidence that making books available under open licenses results in more downloads than making books available under licenses that only allow for personal use. Yet, additional aggregation in the DOAB has a large positive effect on the number of times a book is downloaded. CONCLUSION The application of open licenses to books does not, on its own, lead to more downloads. However, open licenses pave the way for intermediaries to offer new discovery and aggregation services. These services play an important role by amplifying the impacts of open access licensing in the case of scholarly books.

Creative Commons awarded $800,000 from Arcadia to support discovery and collaboration in the global commons

Creative Commons is pleased to announce an award of new funding in the amount of $800,000 over two years from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, in support of CC Search, a Creative Commons technology project designed to maximize discovery and use of openly licensed content in the Commons.

The post Creative Commons awarded $800,000 from Arcadia to support discovery and collaboration in the global commons appeared first on Creative Commons.

How scientists can comply with the H2020 open access mandate through self archiving | ilSarrett

“Very short version

  1. (optional) When you submit your article to a journal, upload that pre-print non-peer-reviewd version in a pre-print repository of your choice (e.g. Zenodo, MarXiv, …) with a CC-BY licence.
  2. When your article has been accepted, upload that post-print peer-reviwed version  in MarXiv (with the licence required by the publisher; e.g. it could be a CC-BY-NC-ND licence)
  3. Wait till the final paper is published in your selected journal.”

NIH 3D Print Exchange | A collection of biomedical 3D printable files and 3D printing resources supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“3D printing technology is advancing at a rapid pace, but it is difficult to find or create 3D-printable models that are scientifically accurate or medically applicable. The NIH 3D Print Exchange provides models in formats that are readily compatible with 3D printers, and offers a unique set of tools to create and share 3D-printable models related to biomedical science….

Creative Commons licenses can be applied to models submitted to our database. Read our licensing policy to find find out more information on permission, attribution, and how to choose a license….”