UK Universities and Elsevier negotiations: July update

“UK Universities, which includes the University of Leicester, on behalf of their researchers, are currently negotiating for an open access (OA) agreement with Elsevier. The two core objectives are:

 

To reduce costs to levels they can sustain
To provide full and immediate open access to UK research. …

50% of all UK research output is now covered by a transitional agreement…”

Jisc to manage central licensing and invoicing for Direct to Open from the MIT Press | The MIT Press

“oday, the MIT Press announced that Jisc will handle central licensing and invoicing for Direct to Open (D2O) for their member libraries. An innovative, sustainable framework for open access monographs, D2O moves professional and scholarly books from a solely market-based, purchase model to a collaborative, library-supported open access model. 

Developed over two years with the generous support of the Arcadia Fund, D2O gives institutions the opportunity to harness collective action to support access to knowledge. Thanks to the centralized service, Jisc libraries will not have to negotiate agreement terms and will be able to use the invoicing processes they are used to through the consortium. 

Jisc libraries that commit to support Direct to Open before September 30, 2021 will earn exclusive benefits. They will gain term access to an archive of gated titles, including classic works by Rosalind Krauss, Daniel Dennett, Noam Chomsky, Paul Krugman, Sherry Turkle, and many more. D2O participating libraries also receive special discounting on the MIT Press’s trade books collection on the MIT Press Direct platform. If D2O does not reach the success threshold for 2022, participating libraries are assured term access to the archive collection without paying the fee….”

Jisc has joined Sparc Europe – Jisc scholarly communications

“Earlier this year, Jisc became a member of Sparc Europe, which may come as a bit of a surprise since Jisc and Sparc Europe have collaborated on various things over the years, such as the Research Data competition with the University of Cambridge, and Jisc provided founding support for the organisation back in 2003, along with Research Libraries UK (RLUK) and SURF in the Netherlands. Jisc is also a supporter of The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS), and Sherpa Romeo, the Jisc service which aggregates and analyses publisher open access policies, is a direct beneficiary of the crowd sourcing initiative.

Part of the reason Jisc joined now, arguably, is precisely because of those engagements, as well as that during COVID, many organisations like Jisc, continue to see the value of promoting open access and open research as much as we can. Sparc Europe was one of the main contributors to the recently published Diamond OA Study, which included an in-depth report and associated recommendations arising from a study of open access journals across the world that are free for readers and authors; the other major contributor to that study was OPERAS, which stands for “open scholarly communication in the European Research Area for Social Sciences and Humanities”, of which Jisc is also a member. Jisc is also active in LIBER, the Association of European Research Libraries; even though we’re not members of Liber, there is much overlap in how both entities support libraries, and Sparc Europe again is actively engaged in that space. Jisc also has a representative who sits on the board of Sparc Europe. Therefore, it increasingly became obvious that both Sparc Europe and Jisc were working so closely together that it made perfect sense to be even more closely connected….”

Jisc negotiates transformative agreement with the National Academy of Sciences | Jisc

“Jisc and the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (NAS) are pleased to announce a two-year transformational open access (OA) pilot agreement.

The ‘Publish and Read’ deal will allow UK corresponding authors at participating institutions to publish OA articles in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) without incurring any publication charges. Researchers at participating Jisc institutions will be able to access all PNAS content, dating back to 1915, for free….”

Jisc and CNI leaders conference | Jisc

“The COVID-19 pandemic has reshaped the research landscape. The online Jisc and CNI leaders conference will focus on the pivotal role the library will play in enabling universities to equip themselves to respond. We’ll also explore the potential disruption it could cause.

Through the conference theme – at the frontier of research practice: the university library as a catalyst – we’ll cover topics such as monographs and long-form scholarly works: transitioning to open, open and faster scholarly communication in a post-COVID-19 world, how research collections are evolving and researcher environments of tomorrow….”

Guest Post – Open and Faster Scholarly Communication in a Post-COVID World – The Scholarly Kitchen

“The pandemic presented an urgency for effective science to inform decision-making and has shown just how fast and open scholarly communication can be. Researchers shared their preliminary results on preprint servers and institutional repositories at unprecedented rates, inspiring various preprint peer-review initiatives. Journal publishers processed manuscripts from submission to publication in record time. And much of what we know about Covid-19 has been learned through data sharing and cooperation at the international level, with the use of critical data-sharing infrastructure.

While the research community has responded with an extraordinary level of openness, speed, and collaboration, it has also brought to the fore some of the key challenges we still face in the transition to open research – and the opportunities they represent….”

 

Research systems connect | Jisc

“Research systems connect is a fully managed, cloud-based service that joins up your existing institutional research systems (including your CRIS, repository and preservation systems) so you can save time on transferring data and metadata between your systems and free up staff time for other tasks. It also connects to external scholarly communications services, maximising impact with minimal effort….”

 

Open Research Quarterly Update – Issue 2: June 2021

“Hello, and welcome to the June issue of the Open Research Quarterly Update (Digest). Here in the Open Research Services team at Jisc our mission is to help members embrace the benefits of open research by removing barriers, embedding open practices and developing open infrastructure. Much of our focus across Jisc involves working with the sector to negotiate agreements and develop services which underpin open research. This quarter’s update includes numerous examples of this in action.

Publications Router continues to expand its publishers’ contributions, while the Sherpa team have developed a new dataset which will provide details of Transitional Agreements to our users. In addition, Jisc Collections have been working with SCONUL to provide the Unsub dashboard. This month sees the first meeting of the Research Identifier National Coordinating Council (RINCC) on 21st June, which will coincide with the publication of a Cost Benefit Analysis Report, funded by the UK Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) for Open Access project….”

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure: a call for action – Jisc Research

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure: a call for action

 

This is a guest blog post by Pierre Mounier, Jeroen Sondervan, and Graham Stone.

Join Pierre Mounier (EHESS, OpenEdition, OPERAS), Jeroen Sondervan (Knowledge Exchange Open Access Working Group and Utrecht University Library), Graham Stone (Jisc), and key stakeholders in signing a position paper calling for investment in the open access book infrastructure (Zenodo version of record, Google doc version for signatories).

In June 2020, we published a blog Open Access to academic books: Working towards the “tipping point”, which reflected on the work of the Knowledge Exchange (KE) task and finish group’s work around open access books (see “Towards a Roadmap for Open Access Monographs: A Knowledge Exchange Report”. The blogpost led to a number of valuable discussions with stakeholders and key experts in the OA books community regarding the need to develop a joined up approach to the open infrastructure required for a successful transition to open access for books.

In light of forthcoming (and existing) policy on open access for books, the KE task and finish group agreed to extend their work on open access books by facilitating a partner exchange in February 2021. This one-day virtual workshop gathered key stakeholders, including representatives of cOAlition S, SPARC Europe, OASPA, OAPEN, DARIAH-EU, OpenAIRE, national funders, KE partner organizations and many more.

After a brief overview, the day used a workshop approach to develop a common understanding on the need for further attention and support for open access for academic books. Delegates explored the key issues in three parallel sessions (OA Book Watch, OA Book Network, OA Book infrastructure), before a Mentimeter poll was used to prioritise areas for further discussion. At the end of a long day of vibrant and fruitful discussion, we took stock of the contributions and discussed the idea of a position paper on open access books infrastructure. A writing group was formed and we started work on the position paper.

FREE UKSG webinar – Back to the Future: Lessons learned from the Jisc OA Textbook project | UKSG

“With eTextbooks high on library and publisher agendas and the controversy over costs and access raging, OA textbooks could be a solution. What are the considerations for initiating, and sustaining an open access textbook directly linked to teaching at one institution, but open to all? The 2014-2018 Jisc Institution as eTextbook Publisher project funded OA textbook pilots and created a toolkit. Liverpool published 2 titles, in a partnership with the Library and Liverpool University Press. In this webinar we will revisit the project and look forward, considering resource and expertise requirements for a sustainable OA textbook model….”

Introducing Jisc’s new university press toolkit | Jisc

“The 2017 landscape study of New University Presses (NUPs) and academic-led publishing, Changing publishing ecologies (pdf), found that a growing number of universities and academics have set up their own mission-based presses in an attempt establish autonomy from the large legacy publishing houses.

One of the recommendations of that report was to create a best practice toolkit to assist with the planning and establishment of new university and library-led presses publishing open access material.

In March 2021, Jisc launched a toolkit that will support new and existing university and library open access publishing ventures. The toolkit was developed with the input from an international editorial advisory board consisting of university presses from Liverpool, Stockholm, Westminster, White Rose and University College London and other experts in the field.

This webinar will discuss the aims and objectives of the toolkit, including a short walkthrough. This will be followed by a panel session featuring members of the editorial advisory board and a Q&A session….”

Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc agree transformational deal for UK research

“Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc have signed a three-year transitional agreement combining access and open access (OA) publishing to Taylor & Francis Group’s portfolio of journals.

The agreement is truly transformative and provides participating Jisc members with an OA allowance that covers 100% of the current levels of UK research Taylor & Francis Group has been publishing on a subscription basis.

As the largest humanities and social sciences (HSS) publisher, publishing 9% of all UK research, this agreement is particularly important as a route to OA for HSS researchers who do not regularly benefit from the same levels of funding as their peers in the science, technology and medicine (STM) disciplines.

The partnership recognises the goals of research funders and Jisc to transform access to UK research output so that the impact derived from research can be increased. Researchers will be provided with frictionless open access publishing at no cost to them with a streamlined and optimised workflow. To ensure that the deal continues to reflect researchers’ needs over time, participating members are being invited to sign up for an initial three-year period and have the option to extend for a further two years….”

Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc agree transformational deal for UK research

“Taylor & Francis Group and Jisc have signed a three-year transitional agreement combining access and open access (OA) publishing to Taylor & Francis Group’s portfolio of journals.

The agreement is truly transformative and provides participating Jisc members with an OA allowance that covers 100% of the current levels of UK research Taylor & Francis Group has been publishing on a subscription basis.

As the largest humanities and social sciences (HSS) publisher, publishing 9% of all UK research, this agreement is particularly important as a route to OA for HSS researchers who do not regularly benefit from the same levels of funding as their peers in the science, technology and medicine (STM) disciplines.

The partnership recognises the goals of research funders and Jisc to transform access to UK research output so that the impact derived from research can be increased. Researchers will be provided with frictionless open access publishing at no cost to them with a streamlined and optimised workflow. To ensure that the deal continues to reflect researchers’ needs over time, participating members are being invited to sign up for an initial three-year period and have the option to extend for a further two years….”