Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A)

“The A&A Board of Directors has announced that their journal will move to a Subscribe-to-Open (S2O) model. If libraries renew their subscriptions, A&A will be published in full open access in 2022. Since its launch in 1969, A&A has been publishing pioneering, peer reviewed scientific content. The transition to open access will extend access of its high-quality research to a worldwide audience – furthering the field of astronomy and astrophysics. Library subscriptions, together with substantial contributions from the A&A sponsoring countries, will cover publication and editorial costs and enable content to become open access….”

Open Access book pilot – Flip it Open

“Welcome to our exciting new Open Access books initiative, Flip it Open. We will publish and sell a selection of 28 books through our regular channels, treating them at the outset in the same way as any other book; they will be part of our library collections for Cambridge Core, as well being sold as hardbacks and ebooks. The one crucial difference is that we are making an upfront commitment that when each of these books meets a set revenue threshold we will make them available to everyone Open Access via Cambridge Core.  

At the point where titles go Open Access, we will also be releasing an affordable paperback edition. Both the digital and paperback new editions will contain a page calling out and thanking the institutions who bought the book at the outset, thereby contributing to its flipping to Open Access.”

KU and S2O – North American Webinar

“Please join Knowledge Unlatched’s US Sales team for a webinar discussing the Subscribe-to-Open (S2O) approach to converting scholarly journals to open access. The session, to last about 45 minutes with Q&A, will discuss S2O as an open access model in general, with added details about the four HSS and STEM Subscribe-to-Open KU offerings that are now active. Particular emphasis will be provided about this year’s new S2O offering for a package of six important journals in applied mathematics from EDP Sciences.”

OLH reopens applications to flip subscription journals to open access | Open Library of Humanities

We are delighted to announce that the Open Library of Humanities is now open to expressions of interest from subscription journals in the humanities seeking to move to a gold open access (OA) publishing model without author-facing charges (‘diamond’ OA).

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future. Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

The AAS goes for Gold | Published by The Open Journal of Astrophysics

“Yesterday there was a big announcement from the American Astronomical Society (AAS) , namely that all its journals will switch to Open Access from 1st January 2022. This transition will affect the Astronomical Journal (AJ), the Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL), and the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS). Previously authors were able to opt for Open Access but from next year it will apply to all papers.

The positive aspect to this change is that it makes articles published by the AAS freely available to the public and other scientists without requiring the payment of a subscription.

On the other hand, these journals will require authors to pay a hefty sum, equivalent to an Article Processing Charge (APC), that increases with the length and complexity of a paper. AAS journals have in the past levied “page charges” from authors for standard (non-OA) publications. In the new regime these are merged into a unified scheme….

What’s on offer is therefore a form of Gold Open Access that switches the cost of publication from subscribers to authors. In my view this level of APC is excessive, which is why I call this Fool’s Gold Open Access. Although the AAS is a not-for-profit organization, its journals are published by the Institute of Physics Publishing which is a definitely-for-profit organization….”

(IUCr) An open-access future for Journal of Synchrotron Radiation – Editorial from the Main Editors and IUCr Journals Editor-in-Chief

“The entire Journal of Synchrotron Radiation (JSR) editorial team would like to take this opportunity to inform all our readers, authors and supporters about the coming transition to open access. All papers submitted to JSR after 1 October 2021 will be for open-access publication. By taking this step, JSR is supporting a journey towards open science in general….

At this time, we wish to express our enormous appreciation of JSR’s supporting (facility) institutions. We also hope that more supporting institutions will join with JSR as we move forward from here. JSR supporting institutions are entitled to a certain number of open-access article processing charge (APC) vouchers per year for papers reporting work carried out at their facilities. Alternatively, if the contact author’s home institution is included in a transformative or read-and-publish arrangement with the IUCr’s publication partner, Wiley, those authors will be able to publish open-access research or review articles in JSR with no direct (APC) charge. Currently, such arrangements exist in Austria, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. Contact authors with connections to IUCr (Associates, members of national affiliates, World Directory of Crystallography, etc.) will receive modest APC discounts. Meanwhile, discounts (50%) for authors from lower middle income countries and waivers (100%) from low income countries will be issued. However, please note that a major difference from present arrangements is that all submitting authors will need to apply for such discounts and waivers at the time of submission and payments will be handled via Wiley authors services (for more details see https://journals.iucr.org/s/services/openaccess.html)….”

 

AAS Journals Will Switch to Open Access in 2022

Research results in astronomy, solar physics, and planetary science are about to become more widely accessible to scientists and the public alike. The American Astronomical Society (AAS), a leading nonprofit professional association for astronomers, today announced the switch of its prestigious journals to fully open access (OA) as of 1 January 2022.

AAS Journals Will Switch to Open Access | American Astronomical Society

“Research results in astronomy, solar physics, and planetary science are about to become more widely accessible to scientists and the public alike. The American Astronomical Society (AAS), a leading nonprofit professional association for astronomers, today announced the switch of its prestigious journals to fully open access (OA) as of 1 January 2022.

Under this change, all articles in the AAS journal portfolio will be immediately open for anyone to freely read. The transition will affect the Astronomical Journal (AJ), the Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL), and the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS); the Planetary Science Journal, the AAS’s newest journal published in partnership with its Division for Planetary Sciences, is already fully open access….”

The Journal of Diabetes is adopting Open Access – Bloomgarden – – Journal of Diabetes – Wiley Online Library

“”The Editors and Associate Editors of the Journal have looked with great interest at the growth of the Open Access model of medical publishing. Fundamentally, we consider highly desirable the goal of making the research and commentary of the Journal fully available to all those involved in the understanding and treatment of diabetes. In a sense, Open Access began in the Medical Sciences in mid- 1997, when Medline (the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online) was made available via PubMed, a bibliographic database of life sciences and biomedical information ( 1 ) used by most of those in the field. For those of us whose professional childhood began with trips to the Medical Library to pore over monthly and yearly printed (and weighty) tomes of Index Medicus, PubMed was nothing short of revolutionary, and we recall the excitement with which we greeted its initial appearance. With Open Access, particularly as more journal move to this model, authors can count on reaching an audience far larger than that of a subscription-based journal, essentially all of those with internet access, allowing greater visibility and impact of their work. With a click on the Table of Contents, and soon with a click on PubMed Central (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ ), readers will have access to the full details of all articles we publish, rather than just having access to abstracts and one table or figure. This should translate into greater support of a more sustainable model for the work of education carried out by Libraries and Universities ( 2 ). As with many other journals in the field ( 3 ), we are now committed to a move to Open Access to begin in the first issue of 2022. The dilemma, and one about which we have had a great deal of internal debate, is that the cost of carrying out the activities of the Journal, with peer-review processes and maintenance of high publishing standards, will no longer be funded by subscriptions. We have wrestled with the unavoidable manuscript charges which will be required under Open Access. Arguments have been made on both sides as to whether this is or is not a desirable development ( 4 ).We fully expect that charges will be usually be borne by employers or funders, and in certain cases partially or fully waived (and we encourage authors to apply for this when their financial capacity is limited). But, the benefits will include greater visibility as more readers will be able to access published articles, and we will continue to endeavor to process manuscripts rapidly to help with their more widespread dissemination.”

Transformation | British Dental Journal

“The BDJ [British Dental Journal] has become what is termed a Transformative Journal (TJ)….

A TJ commits, among other things, to continuously increase the OA share each year and to ‘flip’ to full OA for primary research once a 75% threshold has been met, and to maximise take-up of the OA option by proactively promoting the benefits of OA to authors of primary research articles….

How soon the 75% OA content is reached is difficult to estimate. It is probably some years away, but the important aspect is the commitment to aim for this transformation while also continuing to develop the value of the journal both in print and online for all users.”

The Journal of Diabetes is adopting Open Access

“”The Editors and Associate Editors of the Journal have looked with great interest at the growth of the Open Access model of medical publishing. Fundamentally, we consider highly desirable the goal of making the research and commentary of the Journal fully available to all those involved in the understanding and treatment of diabetes. In a sense, Open Access began in the Medical Sciences in mid- 1997, when Medline (the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online) was made available via PubMed, a bibliographic database of life sciences and biomedical information ( 1 ) used by most of those in the field. For those of us whose professional childhood began with trips to the Medical Library to pore over monthly and yearly printed (and weighty) tomes of Index Medicus, PubMed was nothing short of revolutionary, and we recall the excitement with which we greeted its initial appearance. With Open Access, particularly as more journal move to this model, authors can count on reaching an audience far larger than that of a subscription-based journal, essentially all of those with internet access, allowing greater visibility and impact of their work. With a click on the Table of Contents, and soon with a click on PubMed Central (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ ), readers will have access to the full details of all articles we publish, rather than just having access to abstracts and one table or figure. This should translate into greater support of a more sustainable model for the work of education carried out by Libraries and Universities ( 2 ). As with many other journals in the field ( 3 ), we are now committed to a move to Open Access to begin in the first issue of 2022. The dilemma, and one about which we have had a great deal of internal debate, is that the cost of carrying out the activities of the Journal, with peer-review processes and maintenance of high publishing standards, will no longer be funded by subscriptions. We have wrestled with the unavoidable manuscript charges which will be required under Open Access. Arguments have been made on both sides as to whether this is or is not a desirable development ( 4 ).We fully expect that charges will be usually be borne by employers or funders, and in certain cases partially or fully waived (and we encourage authors to apply for this when their financial capacity is limited). But, the benefits will include greater visibility as more readers will be able to access published articles, and we will continue to endeavor to process manuscripts rapidly to help with their more widespread dissemination….”

Transformative Journals: an initial assessment | Plan S

“A Transformative Journal (TJ) is a subscription/hybrid journal that is actively committed to transitioning to a fully Open Access journal. In addition, a TJ must:

gradually increase the share of Open Access content; and
offset subscription income from payments for publishing services (to avoid double payments).

Some 16 months on from publishing the formal TJ criteria, 13 publishers – large and small, for-profit, not-for-profit, society publishers and university presses – and some 2268 journals, have enrolled in this programme.

This blog provides a summary of the uptake of the programme by publishers and an analysis of the initial data TJ publishers have provided….”

Digital Transformation of University-Run Journals

“Universities need to pivot from print or paywalled journals and implement open access publishing models for better scalability and discoverability of the journals. We all know that the digital setting is progressively open where readers have free multi-platform accessibility to content (scholarly articles, research publications, and academic journals) in the most readily available formats.

The digitally-driven research dissemination and increasing momentum in knowledge consumption have spurred the adoption of open access movement across the publishing market….”

Beginning of JPR’s great voyage to the open science world

“Many academic societies are currently undergoing this transition [to OA], and in the process, some major international publishers are double dipping, charging high subscription fees as well as expensive APCs. We strongly support open science initiatives and have long sought to move JPR to be a fully open journal. However, if we had continued to publish under Elsevier, moving to a fully open journal would have resulted in significant costs for both the authors and Japan Prosthodontic Society (JPS). After much discussion, we have finally made a decision regarding this crucial issue.

In 2021, JPS changed publishers, moving from Elsevier to J-STAGE, which now publishes JPR as a full-OA journal….”