Preprints em CSP

From Google’s English:  “CSP [Cad Saúde Pública] is a journal that guarantees public and free access to its entire collection for the reading public, an essential part of the principles of Open Science. In addition, CSP recognizes the importance of preprints in today’s scientific publishing scenario and, since 2020, accepts articles previously deposited in non-commercial preprint repositories (eg: arXiv, bioRxiv, medRxiv, Zenodo and SciELO Preprints), before submission to the journal or during the peer review process.

 

In these two situations, it is necessary for the author to notify the journal’s editorial team and inform the name of the preprints server and the DOI assigned to the article.two?? However, the practice of publishing preprints of an article already approved in CSP on a server is not recommended. In this case, the participation of the scientific community debating with the author will not contribute to the improvement of the article and the duplicate DOI can harm the authors and the journal….

It is emphasized that the deposit of the article in the preprints server is a decision of the author. It is worth noting, however, the implications for the double-blind peer review system adopted by CSP, since it makes it possible to identify authorship.”

EDI and open access: How JACMP is the future of ethical publishing—A tale in two parts – Hedrick – Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics – Wiley Online Library

“The Wiley and the JACMP are committed to advancing equity, diversity, and inclusivity within the journal and the entire publishing process. Some current efforts include the signing of the Joint Commitment for Action on Inclusion and Diversity in Publishing, utilizing double blind review, and providing open access to all JACMP articles. Future endeavors, aligning with the Joint Commitment, will likely include collecting diversity data from authors and reviewers, pushing the JACMP to the forefront of ethical publishing. We cannot do our best work  without including the best minds. As Mother Teresa said, “I can do things you cannot, you can do things I cannot; together we can do great things.” ”

Tectonic shifts in academic publishing – McGill Reporter

“McGill Library’s support for a new seismology journal is just one example of how the Library is helping researchers challenge the status quo in academic publishing…

Seismica, which charges neither subscription fees for readers, nor publication fees for authors, is a landmark in Rowe’s move away from the world of for-profit academic publishing. After more than 10 years serving on the editorial boards of several journals in her field, she says she decided to cut ties with big publishers. A watershed moment came in 2020 when the Nature Publishing Group (NPG) announced an author fee of €10,000 for each paper published in one of its ‘open access’ journals. At a time when government funding agencies are increasingly requiring researchers to publish their work in open access journals as a condition of their grants, moves like this are seen by some as a strategy on the part of commercial publishers to shore up their revenue base by shifting fees from subscribers to authors.

According to Rowe, however, researchers themselves are partly to blame for feeding a cycle of high fees and perceived status in academic publishing. “The only reason authors would pay [these fees] is for the prestige – and potential career benefits – of publishing in Nature,” she says. “In other words, we academics have created an expensive spiral of prestige and power – which we ourselves enforce on one another – which drives the flow of grant money toward these publishing companies.” …”

Tectonic shifts in academic publishing – McGill Reporter

“Seismica, which charges neither subscription fees for readers, nor publication fees for authors, is a landmark in Rowe’s move away from the world of for-profit academic publishing. After more than 10 years serving on the editorial boards of several journals in her field, she says she decided to cut ties with big publishers. A watershed moment came in 2020 when the Nature Publishing Group (NPG) announced an author fee of €10,000 for each paper published in one of its ‘open access’ journals. At a time when government funding agencies are increasingly requiring researchers to publish their work in open access journals as a condition of their grants, moves like this are seen by some as a strategy on the part of commercial publishers to shore up their revenue base by shifting fees from subscribers to authors.

According to Rowe, however, researchers themselves are partly to blame for feeding a cycle of high fees and perceived status in academic publishing. “The only reason authors would pay [these fees] is for the prestige – and potential career benefits – of publishing in Nature,” she says. “In other words, we academics have created an expensive spiral of prestige and power – which we ourselves enforce on one another – which drives the flow of grant money toward these publishing companies.” …

It was NPG’s “obscene increase” in author fees, says Rowe, that helped spur a loose consortium of researchers to start a journal of their own. With advice from the editors of Volcanica, a similar journal that had launched a year earlier, Rowe and seven of her colleagues spent the best part of 2021 laying the groundwork for Seismica, which opened for submissions in July 2022. …”

The Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine goes full open access in 2023 – IOS Press

“All accepted manuscripts submitted after 2022 will be published open access. Open access fees will be processed only after a manuscript is accepted. Many institutions have mechanisms to cover open access fees, as do those with grant-funded research. In some circumstances, the open access fee can be waived, for example, if the author’s institution participates in a national open access agreement, or meets the eligibility criteria of Research4Life. Please refer to the author guidelines for more detailed information.

Open access has historically not decreased submissions. In fact, many journals find that submissions increase as authors benefit from the increased exposure that open access provides [1]. More individuals are able to see their published work as many do not have access to specialized subscriptions. Additionally, full-text indexing in PubMed Central will further improve JPRM’s accessibility and prominence.

Our journal is global, and we arrived at this decision after taking in the landscape of the scholarly published world. Many European researchers will already be familiar with momentum shifts toward full open access mandates by institutions and funding bodies. Shortly after the open access agreement between IOS Press and JPRM was reached, the United States announced an initiative to improve access for federally funded research [2]. Research supported by the NIH and other governmental funders will need to be free to access immediately upon publication without any time period behind a paywall, which previously could be as long as a year. While this change will not affect all US researchers, its impact may be the first of many steps toward shifting US scholarly publishing closer to a fully open access future….”

The origins of Education Policy Analysis Archives in an era of early open access publishing | Education Policy Analysis Archives

Abstract:  In conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the open access scholarly journal, Education Policy Analysis Archives, Founder and Editor Emeritus Gene V Glass presents a brief history of the journal, including its online predecessors and offshoots, within the context of computer and information technology developments and the early open access movement in scholarly publishing.

Updates on Parasitology and adopting a Gold Open Access Model of production | Parasitology | Cambridge Core

“Many readers will have noted that all published articles within Parasitology from January 2022 onwards were available online only. The hardcopy production, like many other academic journals, has now ceased. This is true not only for regular issues but also for forthcoming special issues. Moreover, from January 2023, Parasitology will become Open Access (OA) where we adopt a Gold Open Access Model, specifically a non-exclusive Gold Open Access CC-BY licence….”

Open access articles deliver real value to the veterinary community—and to our authors in: American Journal of Veterinary Research Volume 83 Issue 10 (2022)

” The Directory of Open Access Journals (https://doaj.org) lists 7.8 million articles and over 17,000 peer-reviewed, open access journals, 115 of which cover veterinary medicine. One of my first initiatives as Editor-in-Chief was to propose converting our research journal, the American Journal of Veterinary Research (AJVR), to full open access, meaning that our member and nonmember individual and library subscribers no longer need to pay to access our cutting-edge research content. We also converted AJVR from a monthly printed publication to an online-only journal, hosted on our completely revamped journals platform, http://avmajournals.avma.org. We established publishing fees at $1,600 for nonmember authors and $1,200 for AVMA member corresponding or first authors. The publishing fees are among the least in the veterinary literature and the delta between the two fees is the cost of membership, providing member benefit to repeat authors.

In tandem, we completely revamped the journal’s editorial board and began marketing intensely for manuscript submissions. And it is working! To date, we have published 158 articles in AJVR this year, up 68 from the same period in 2021. The change to open access has been extraordinarily well received by researchers, faculty, students, and practitioners everywhere.

The JAVMA also offers opportunities for open access publication. It remains a subscription-based journal (members receive it monthly as an AVMA member benefit) but is defined as “hybrid”; that is, for specific articles, authors can pay the publishing fee, retain copyright, and enjoy worldwide dissemination of their findings.

Our strategic editorial development plan includes increasing the number of high-quality randomized control trials (RCTs; ie, a paper describing a study that randomly assigns patients into an experimental or control group). Good RCTs bring evidence to our clinical decision-making, are very popular, and receive high downloads and citations. We will of course provide tailored and intensive social media campaigns, including Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, and interviews on our Veterinary Vertex Podcast.

Through the end of 2022, we are offering authors of newly submitted RCTs for either AJVR or JAVMA a 50% discount on article publication fees: $600 for members and $800 for nonmembers….”

Patient outcomes, open access: Ginny Barbour sets MJA agenda | InSight+

“There’s no doubt for me that we are moving along a trajectory where open access is absolutely going to be the outcome. The question is just how we get there and how quickly we get there.

Just a couple of weeks ago, the Office of Science and Technology Policy from the United States White House put out an edict that all federally funded research in the US must be made open access by 2026. In Australia already, we have a number of moves that are going in that direction.

We know that our Chief Scientist Dr Cathy Foley is looking at that closely, and the [National Health and Medical Research Council] and the [Australian Research Council] have open access policies.

I think it’s fair to say that this is a topic of great interest and Australia probably needs to move a little bit quicker.

“For the MJA [Medical Journal of Australia], there’s no question that we want open access. We want that research to be read; it needs to be used and reused, not just by practitioners but by patients. Open access can only be a good thing for the Journal.”

Removing author fees can help open access journals make research available to everyone

“Publishing a journal requires money, but that amounts to only 10 to 15 per cent of what publishers charge authors to make their work open access. Author fees are disproportionate with publishing costs, and correlate to the journal’s prestige, impact and profit model.

In this environment, author fees will continue to increase so long as someone can pay for it. It also means that open access publishing privileges a certain set of researchers….”

Scientific Openness and Integrity: Two Decades of Interactive Open Access Publishing and Open Peer Review

“For more than 20 years, the scientific journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) has been a pioneer in open access publishing and public peer review with interactive discussion. All articles published in it are accessible free of charge via the internet. By recording and opening up the peer review process, the interactive open access journals lead to an internet of knowledge or epistemic web that does not only reflect what we know but also how we know it, i.e., how well it has been validated.

The achievements of ACP and further interactive open access sister journals of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) will be celebrated, reflected, and further developed at a special meeting of the ACP editorial board and the EGU publications committee on 19 September 2022 at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (MPIC) in Mainz. The meeting is supported by the open access publisher Copernicus, which operates the journal on behalf of EGU in a not-for-profit manner.

Ensure free speech, critical discussion, and transparency in scientific communication and quality assurance

Since the journal launch in 2001, ACP has grown to become one of the major international journals in atmospheric science, now handling around a thousand submissions per year. ACP’s success was not assured when it launched. Open peer review, in which the reviewer comments, author replies, and additional public comments from the scientific community are published immediately, was radical in 2001. “Our guiding principle was to achieve highest levels of scientific integrity through free speech and transparency in scientific exchange and quality assurance”, says Max Planck Director Ulrich Pöschl, who had initiated ACP.

The interactive open access publishing concept was developed more than 20 years ago by researchers connected through the MPI for Chemistry. “It has been a lot of joy and work to initiate, design, and establish interactive open-access publishing with an equally pleasant and strong team of friends and colleagues, including Paul Crutzen and Arne Richter, who are unfortunately not with us anymore but deserve special thanks for the swift initial gain of momentum”, says Uli Pöschl, who led ACP until recently, chaired the EGU publications committee for many years, and continues to promote open access also through the global initiative OA2020 and related activities.”

Reflections on a decade using Scholastica at GEP: Interview with Susan Altman

“Since 2000, MIT Press’ Global Environmental Politics journal has been publishing novel research examining the relationships between worldwide political forces and environmental change. In the early days of the journal, GEP’s founding editorial team managed its peer review process via a combination of email and spreadsheets. However, as the publication grew, they realized they needed dedicated software for submission tracking and manuscript management.

In 2013, the journal’s Managing Editor, Susan Altman, began working with Scholastica’s peer review system, which was selected by MIT Press because it offered a centralized place for tracking submissions and communicating with editors, authors, and reviewers. In the interview below, Altman reflects on GEP’s experience moving to Scholastica for peer review management, the editorial team’s experience working with Scholastica over the past decade, and the journal’s evolution up to this point….”

Reflections on a decade using Scholastica at GEP: Interview with Susan Altman

“Since 2000, MIT Press’ Global Environmental Politics journal has been publishing novel research examining the relationships between worldwide political forces and environmental change. In the early days of the journal, GEP’s founding editorial team managed its peer review process via a combination of email and spreadsheets. However, as the publication grew, they realized they needed dedicated software for submission tracking and manuscript management.

In 2013, the journal’s Managing Editor, Susan Altman, began working with Scholastica’s peer review system, which was selected by MIT Press because it offered a centralized place for tracking submissions and communicating with editors, authors, and reviewers. In the interview below, Altman reflects on GEP’s experience moving to Scholastica for peer review management, the editorial team’s experience working with Scholastica over the past decade, and the journal’s evolution up to this point….”

Embracing the value of research data: introducing the JCHLA/JABSC Data Sharing Policy | Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada

Abstract:  As health sciences researchers have been asked to share their data more frequently due to funder policies, journal requirements, or interest from their peers, health sciences librarians (HSLs) have simultaneously begun to provide support to researchers in this space through training, participating in RDM efforts on research grants, and developing comprehensive data services programs. If supporting researchers’ data sharing efforts is a worthwhile investment for HSLs, it is crucial that we practice data sharing in our own research endeavours. sharing data is a positive step in the right direction, as it can increase the transparency, reliability, and reusability of HSL-related research outputs. Furthermore, having the ability to identify and connect with researchers in relation to the challenges associated with data sharing can help HSLs empathize with their communities and gain new perspectives on improving support in this area. To that end, the Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (JCHLA / JABSC) has developed a Data Sharing Policy to improve the transparency and reusability of research data underlying the results of its publications. This paper will describe the approach taken to inform and develop this policy. 

 

D-lib magazine pioneered web-based scholarly communication | Proceedings of the 22nd ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries

Abstract:  The web began with a vision of, as stated by Tim Berners-Lee in 1991, “that much academic information should be freely available to anyone”. For many years, the development of the web and the development of digital libraries and other scholarly communications infrastructure proceeded in tandem. A milestone occurred in July, 1995, when the first issue of D-Lib Magazine was published as an online, HTML-only, open access magazine, serving as the focal point for the then emerging digital library research community. In 2017 it ceased publication, in part due to the maturity of the community it served as well as the increasing availability of and competition from eprints, institutional repositories, conferences, social media, and online journals – the very ecosystem that D-Lib Magazine nurtured and enabled. As long-time members of the digital library community and frequent contributors to D-Lib Magazine, we reflect on the many innovations that D-Lib Magazine pioneered and were made possible by the web, including: open access, HTML-only publication and embracing the hypermedia opportunities afforded by HTML, persistent identifiers and stable URLs, rapid publication, and community engagement. Although it ceased publication after 22 years and 265 issues, it remains unchanged on the live web and still provides a benchmark for academic serials and web-based publishing.