BishopBlog: Universities vs Elsevier: who has the upper hand?

“The academic publisher Elsevier is currently negotiating a deal with UK universities. In Oxford, as in other universities, there have been extensive discussions about the proposed deal; the goals are to reduce costs to sustainable levels and to provide full and immediate open access to UK research. I have a nasty feeling that we could end up in the situation of those at the COP summit: with a deal that where the publishers feel they are giving away a huge amount, while the consumers are still unsatisfied….

The discussions have largely centred around money, and this is a real concern. Publishers charge massively inflated subscription charges, taking as profit money that our libraries could otherwise put to good use. But the problems go way beyond that, including blocking open access to authors’ own work, and giving poor quality and even fraudulent material a veneer of respectability. The publisher currently has considerable power over what gets published but takes little responsibility when things go wrong.

But we also have power, and I think it’s time we started to wield it. I have two proposals: one radical and the other less so, both of which go beyond what is currently being considered in the JISC discussions.

The radical option: move publishing in-house…

The less radical option. An agreement with Elsevier that reflects what we want and need….”

Out in the Open: Launching and Sustainably Growing a Library Journal & Book Hosting Service | 8 November 2021 | Open Publishing Fest

NOVEMBER 08, 2021, 10:00 AM UTC

Out in the Open: Launching and Sustainably Growing a Library Journal & Book Hosting Service

“With new developing policies around Open Access, and with relatively high articles and book processing charges from publishers, it is more important than ever for libraries to engage with open access publishing to provide support for their academics and students. It is even more important to be transparent and open about the process, so that we can foster an open community between libraries, publishers, academics and researchers. Edinburgh University Library has just launched Edinburgh Diamond, a service to support Open Access publishing. The service is free of charge to Edinburgh staff and students and allows them to publish journals and books with full library support in the areas of hosting, technical support, indexing, policy development, best-practice guidance and workflow training….”

Library Publishing Coalition Releases Inaugural Annual Report | Library Publishing Coalition

“The Library Publishing Coalition is delighted to announce the release of its inaugural Annual Report!

In addition to outlining the LPC’s finances, assets, and membership, the Annual Report details the many ways the LPC was able to develop and provide resources to the library publishing community despite the challenges of the last year. From the creation of the LPC Roadmap for Anti-Racist Practice, to holding a fully remote Library Publishing Forum, to assisting with the launch of the Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communication (C4DISC), the LPC was able grow, improve, and build capacity for future endeavours. 

Most importantly, the Annual Report provides us with an opportunity to acknowledge the efforts and accomplishments of the community. The Library Publishing Coalition has made tremendous strides toward meeting its strategic goals this past year, and that work is undertaken by LPC members, working individually, in groups, and alongside our partners and affiliate organizations. All of the people involved in this work offered their time, energy, and expertise to fulfill our vision of a scholarly publishing landscape that is open, inclusive, and sustainable. We’re grateful for their continued care and effort, and hope you will take a moment to celebrate their contributions to the wider community.”

Library Publishing Workflows Project Releases Journal Workflow Documentation | Educopia Institute

“There is no single correct way for a library to publish journals; it’s a process that often grows organically in response to local needs. However, having models to draw from when creating or updating a journal publishing workflow can result in better processes and stronger partnerships. 

To enable library publishers to build on each others’ work in this area, the Library Publishing Workflows project (IMLS 2019-2022) is excited to release a complete set of journal publishing workflow documentation for each of our twelve partner libraries.

 

The programs behind these workflows are large and small, high-touch and light-touch, and staffed and focused in a variety of ways. Individually, they offer models for similar programs. As a set, they highlight the diversity of practice in this vital area of librarianship. 

For each partner library, we have provided a program profile, one or more workflow diagrams, and accompanying detailed workflows. We are also releasing the workflow diagrams as a set, to enable quick review and comparison across all of the workflows. The documentation is the result of more than two years of interviews, revisions, group discussions, and peer reviews. Because publishing workflows are always evolving, however, this documentation represents a snapshot in time….”

LPForum 2019 | Library Publishing Coalition

“The Library Publishing Forum is an annual conference bringing together representatives from libraries engaged in (or considering) publishing initiatives to define and address major questions and challenges; to identify and document collaborative opportunities; and to strengthen and promote this community of practice. The Forum includes representatives from a broad, international spectrum of academic library backgrounds, as well as groups that collaborate with libraries to publish scholarly works, including publishing vendors, university presses, and scholars. The Forum is sponsored by the Library Publishing Coalition, but you do not need to be a member of the LPC to attend….”

Call for Proposals: Library Publishing Forum 2022 | deadline November 15, 2021

“The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) is now accepting proposals for the 2022 Library Publishing Forum! After the success of our Virtual Forums in 2020 and 2021, we are thrilled to offer both in-person and online options this year, with a virtual preconference the week of May 16, 2022, followed by the in-person Library Publishing Forum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 25–26, 2022.

Proposal submissions are welcome from LPC members and nonmembers, including library employees, university press employees, scholars, students, and other scholarly communications and publishing professionals. We seek proposals from people who will help us expand the diversity of perspectives we hear from at the Library Publishing Forum, especially from marginalized identities. We welcome proposals from first-time presenters and representatives of small and emerging publishing programs. Please view the Call for Proposals (https://librarypublishing.org/program/) for detailed information about the Forum and the different formats of proposed sessions. The submission deadline is November 15, 2021.”

Librarians as gate-openers in open access publishing: A case study in the United Arab Emirates – ScienceDirect

The advent of open access (OA) has changed the scholarly communication landscape resulting in disruption of traditional relationships between different stakeholders. Thus, the gatekeeping role of academic librarians has been impaired. However, by assuming the role of gate-openers, librarians have become facilitators of OA uptake in the United Arab Emirates. Results of the UAE librarians survey show that they are aware of OA routes and predatory journals; they are using different instruction methods to educate users on OA resources and publishing; and they harness OA resources along the traditional subscription-based products. Readers of international library journals need to be aware of efforts undertaken by their peers to advance OA mandate outside the Eastern European and North American context, often dominating scholarly communication studies.

Academic Library as Scholarly Publisher Bibliography

“The Academic Library as Scholarly Publisher Bibliography includes over 175 selected English-language articles, books, and technical reports that are useful in understanding the digital scholarly publishing activities of academic libraries since the late 1980’s, especially their open access book and journal publishing activities. The bibliography covers the following subtopics: pioneering academic library publishing projects in the 1980’s and 1990’s, early digital journals and serials published by librarians (as distinct from libraries), library-based scholarly publishing since the Budapest Open Access Initiative, technical publishing infrastructure, and library and university press mergers/partnerships and other relevant works….”

Call for 2022 Entries: Library Publishing Directory and IFLA Library Publishing SIG Global Library Publishing Map | Library Publishing Coalition

The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) and the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) Library Publishing Special Interest Group (LibPub SIG) have partnered to survey the landscape of publishing in libraries across the globe. LPC is seeking submissions for its 9th annual Library Publishing Directory. IFLA’s LibPub SIG has created a first-of-its-kind Map of global library publishing initiatives. Together, we invite you to share information about your library’s publishing activities.

[…]

Digital Transformation of University-Run Journals

“Universities need to pivot from print or paywalled journals and implement open access publishing models for better scalability and discoverability of the journals. We all know that the digital setting is progressively open where readers have free multi-platform accessibility to content (scholarly articles, research publications, and academic journals) in the most readily available formats.

The digitally-driven research dissemination and increasing momentum in knowledge consumption have spurred the adoption of open access movement across the publishing market….”

Announcing the Recipients of the 2021 Publishing Practice Awards

“The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) is excited to announce the recipients of the 2021 Publishing Practice Awards! Congratulations to the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries – Mavs Open Press for exemplary work in the category of Accessibility, and to the University of Cape Town Libraries for exemplary work in the category of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion….”

Intersections: Library Publishing and Scholarly Societies | Library Publishing Coalition

“Beyond acquiring new publications and getting hands-on experience with scholars who do the work of publishing, this work also provides an opportunity for me to help a discipline with knowledge and resources that may be unique to our field of Library Publishing and Scholarly Communication broadly – and the capacity and resources to do that work. One such opportunity has led to one of the most meaningful projects in my career so far. I was delighted to have the opportunity to provide feedback on and early draft of the LSA’s 2018 Statement on the Evaluation of Language Documentation for Hiring, Tenure, and Promotion. This Statement cited the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) in an argument that the intense data management work involved in Language Documentation projects should be viewed on par with other scholarly outputs when evaluating hiring and promotion portfolios, and gives practical advice for doing so. Based on the findings of the RPT Project from the ScholComm Lab at Simon Fraser University, open publishing and open scholarship generally are not mentioned often in Review, Promotion, or Tenure documents, and that this is a very practical barrier for scholars to engage in more open practices. After the LSA’s Statement about Language Documentation was adopted, I heard use cases where scholars and department chairs were able to effectively use this Statement to advocate for hiring and promoting linguists who devote incredible amounts of energy to the careful documentation and sharing of language data.

At this same time, some chairs of linguistics departments had become involved in a project from NASEM’s Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science to identify ways to encourage open scholarship in review documents. Since I had volunteered to be the Chair of the Committee on Scholarly Communication in Linguistics, I was invited to introduce representatives from the Roundtable, Greg Tananbaum and Chris Bourg, at the Department Chairs Meeting in 2020 to talk about this initiative. After their presentation, multiple linguistics department chairs mentioned the usefulness of the 2018 Statement on Language Documentation. As I sat on the sidelines and listened, I sensed the opportunity to create a Statement on the Scholarly Merit and Evaluation of Open Scholarship in Linguistics that would extend the utility of the Language Documentation Statement for all linguists who engage in Open Scholarship. I brought the idea to the committee, and members were enthusiastic about the opportunity. We worked over the next year and a half to draft a statement, conduct an open asynchronous review, make multiple rounds of edits, present at an open meeting at the 2021 Annual Meeting, and finally submit the Statement for approval of the LSA’s Executive Committee. I am proud to say that this Statement was adopted by the LSA on April 29, 2021, and you can now read it published officially on the Linguistic Society of America’s website. When you read it, you will no doubt see resources familiar to Library Publishers – including DORA, the Metrics Toolkit, NASEM’s Roundtable, and the RPT Project. These resources, although familiar to us in the Library Publishing world, are brand new to many linguists reading this Statement. And for Library Publishers, open scholarship products are often the kinds of materials we publish, whether in the form of journals, books, educational resources, datasets, or digital projects; yet our authors are often actively disincentivized from producing this kind of work by evaluation systems that privilege closed-access, traditional forms of scholarship. If we want to enrich and expand our publishing ecosystem, we must lower the barriers that scholars face when they do this work….”

The Values of Library Publishing and Open Infrastructure: Recapping #LPForum21 · Commonplace

“It was my honor to serve on the planning committee for the 8th annual Library Publishing Forum (#LPForum21), held virtually the week of May 10, 2021. I could not have ended my Fellowship with the Library Publishing Coalition on a higher note. The Forum showcased its usual array of superb practical case studies on subjects as varied as open access journals produced by the Chinese American Librarians Association, Black Lives Matter-themed Wikipedia Edit-a-thons, and open-source preprint platforms. One of the major themes recurring throughout the week was the question of who leads, participates in, and is served by global knowledge infrastructure….”

MSU Press Merges With MSU Libraries To Optimize Resoures & Expand Access | MSU Libraries

“In a move that reflects both a national trend and a campus commitment to partnership, Michigan State University Press has merged with Michigan State University Libraries. The announcement was made by Dean of Libraries Joseph A. Salem, Jr.

“We’re thrilled about this partnership, and we think it’s a natural way to support scholarly publication and strengthen our mutual commitment to learning,” Salem said. “Like other academic libraries, MSU Libraries has taken an active role in scholarly publishing. And, like other academic libraries, we’ve always had an important relationship with our university press.”

The merge was effective May 1, but the process of integrating both units will evolve as a gradual transition. Dean Salem’s oversight of MSU Press began at the beginning of the month, but the Press will continue operations in its current location in the Manly Miles building, and the two budgets will remain separated. …

MSU Press Director Gabriel Dotto said the partnership will increase the opportunities inherent in Press-Library synergies. “We anticipate exploring more unique library collections to generate new publications; building our list in Digital Humanities, conceived both as traditional monographs and as born-digital projects; and enhancing the Press’s commitment toward finding sustainable models of open access, building on the two MSU-based OA journals the Press already publishes,” Dotto said….”