Open Access: A New Ecosystem of Research Publications: Library & Information Science Book Chapter | IGI Global

Abstract:  Academic research has traditionally been published under a subscription model with limited access and exposure. However, in recent years, open access (OA) has spawned a new research publishing economy. Journals have become more accessible in the research sector, with anybody able to see or access them for free on an internet platform. In certain research areas, the transition to openness has progressed more quickly than in others. Communication, education, and employment around the globe have become simpler as a result of the dynamic changes taking place online. Learning has become more equitable as a result of having access to information. Such uninhibited access has effectively opened the door to knowledge, educational resources, and a tremendous quantity of data. This material can be used for societal, educational, and scientific purposes. Given quick access, OA was a tremendously beneficial source for academics, scientists, and researchers during the COVID epidemic. This chapter covers issues related to open access, including OA ethics and OA strategies.

 

Webinar Report: An introduction to open science | Inside eLife | eLife

“On April 12, 2022, our eLife Community Ambassadors and Open Science Champions heard and discussed strategies to sustainably advocate for open science (OS), as well as greater integrity and equity in research.

The aim of the webinar was to introduce OS to this global group of more than 300 early-career researchers (ECRs), as well as to discuss different ways of practising OS and how to overcome the barriers to adopting these – all under the guidance of our experienced panel of open science advocates. With our Community Ambassadors programme, we want to enable each researcher to consider their role in creating a more open and inclusive global research environment, and to facilitate a space and community for all those interested to voice any questions about or ideas for promoting OS practices in their local research communities….”

Opinion: It’s time for the academic paywall to fall – The Varsity

“We must eliminate the root source of the issue: subscription-based academic journals. Simply put, the paywalls benefit nobody. Not the postsecondary students who have to limit their academic reading to what’s included in the bundle their universities buy or fork over 30 USD; not the universities, which could benefit from allocating the millions spent on subscription fees to other, more useful, endeavours; and certainly not the researchers, some of whom pay hundreds or thousands of dollars to make their work open access because the publisher refuses to. 

The only ones that come out triumphant are ridiculously profitable academic publishing services like Elsevier — and something about that just isn’t right.”

Open Access Movement; Initiatives And Challenges

“If India wishes to see a rise in the research capabilities of its existing and prospective researchers, it should invest in making the success of open access movement a reality. The first step toward the realization of this goal is to increase awareness amongst Indian public and academics alike regarding the scholarly publishing practices and the various options available therein, including the option of open access, its potential benefits and challenges.”

Open Access Movement: An Overview of Global Policies and Projects

Abstract:  UNESCO’s sustainable development goal no 4 tries to ensure quality education for all by 2030. In this regard availability of quality educational resources free of cost in public domain is much required. Commercial publishers have been part of academia since ages whose sole purpose is monetary gain by selling academic contents to academia which are produced by academin itself.

Due to this, a large portion of world’s public funded research output lies behind the paywall, limiting the availability of education and research related content in public domain. This not only deprives the open education and learning activity but also creates a barrier between rich and poor institutions in accessing contents behind the paywall

To remove this barrier, the Open Access(OA) movement started aiming to create a sustainable environment of learning and bridging ways of research publication that ensures to save the intellectual right of authors but the content be used and accessed. The current article does a review of the remains free to be OA movement and enlightens about the global policies and projects actively running in support of it.

Institutional Repository Policy Checklist — Infographic

“Building an institutional repository in itself is a time-consuming process. And, it doesn’t end there. To actively reap the benefits it offers, you need to invest time and effort in managing it effectively. But, it gets a lot easier if you have a comprehensive institutional repository policy….”

Blog – Open Access Flips Hundreds of Years of Scientific Research | Linux Professional Institute

“We have viewed the spirit of openness from many angles—in free software, open government, and many other trends—in the Open Anniversary series published on this LPI site during 2021. No field has been more transformed by this spirit than academic research, represented by the Open Access movement. This article discusses the major aspects of Open Access, along with the role of Creative Commons licenses.

The first article in this two-part series lays out the concepts and concerns with Open Access….”

Open Science: the Very Idea | SpringerLink

A new book from SpringerNature:

“Describes recent developments in science from a historical, sociological, philosophical perspective and a personal view

Provides a realistic narrative from personal experiences in science and the challenges of producing reliable knowledge

For researchers, stakeholders and anyone interested in the history, philosophy and the current practice of science

This book is open access, which means that you have free and unlimited access.”

Open Science: the Very Idea | SpringerLink

A new book from SpringerNature:

“Describes recent developments in science from a historical, sociological, philosophical perspective and a personal view

Provides a realistic narrative from personal experiences in science and the challenges of producing reliable knowledge

For researchers, stakeholders and anyone interested in the history, philosophy and the current practice of science

This book is open access, which means that you have free and unlimited access.”

Open access is revolutionizing access to research – EPFL

“That’s, in essence, the open science revolution: the drive to update research practices so that they’re better aligned with the needs of citizens and the scientific community, and to take full advantage of the possibilities being offered by new technology. The conventional system for publishing research was the first to be upended by this more modern approach. “The current publication process is simply an extension of the model that arose in the 17th century,” says Dubochet. “Back then, there were clubs of scientists who discussed things with each other and shared their discoveries through letters. These letters were then published in trade journals so that the discoveries could be communicated to the scientific community.” As the years passed, specialist publishing houses took over the role of these clubs, enabling scientists to disseminate their findings through both generalist and field-specific journals. The higher the journal’s impact factor, the greater its prestige. The publishing houses also formalized a system whereby articles submitted for publication were reviewed and vetted by peers. At the same time, university libraries began paying for subscriptions to these journals so that their schools’ researchers could have access to them. As the number of these journals steadily increased, so did the amount of money needed to maintain the subscriptions….”

Understanding Open Data | Open Research Europe

“Open Research Europe endorses the FAIR Data Principles, alongside an open data policy, as a framework to promote the broadest reuse of research data. We believe that sharing research data can accelerate the pace of discovery, provide credibility and recognition for authors, and lead to increased public trust in research. This also brings benefits for wider society, including driving innovation in technology, better evidence-based policymaking, and economic benefits. 

What is Open Data?  

Open Data is data that is available for everyone to access, use and share. For researchers, this refers to any information or materials that have been collected or created as part of your research project – such as survey results, gene sequences, software, code, neuro-images, even audio files. In research, open data practices are also known as ‘data sharing’. 

What is FAIR data?  

The FAIR Guiding Principles were published in Scientific Data in 2016, providing a new framework for research data management, designed to maximize its reuse and support open data practices.  
 
FAIR data is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. FAIR data goes beyond open data, aiming to make the data itself more useful and user-friendly. …”