Job vacancy Head of External Relations and Advocacy | Europeana Pro

“As head of external relations and advocacy at the Europeana Foundation you will manage and develop strategic positioning and relationships to maximise the impact of the Europeana brand in the digital cultural heritage landscape and contribute to strengthening Europeana’s role vis a vis Member States. 

Working directly to the General Director, you will develop narrative and messaging that promotes organisational values and objectives and develop the strategy for engaging with key EU stakeholders.

Working closely with the MarComms team and the Member States Liaison officer, you will develop and deliver an advocacy and stakeholder engagement strategy to support an integrated organisational approach to communications, marketing and stakeholder engagement and you will lead corporate communications and advocacy activities as part of that approach.

This position is key to the success of Europeana as it creates understanding and awareness of the organisation, the value it provides and its role in the cultural, digital and political landscape.  …”

Europeana Conference | Europeana Pro

“Europeana 2022 will take place from 28 – 30 September 2022. It will be a hybrid conference, and we hope to welcome cultural heritage professionals from around the world both in person, to the KB, National Library of the Netherlands in The Hague, and digitally. We aim to explore how we can collaboratively build a common data space for cultural heritage and raise voices from across the sector to empower digital transformation and explore the role digital cultural heritage plays in today’s and tomorrow’s world. …”

Automated search in the archives: testing a new tool | Europeana Pro

“Archives Portal Europe, the online repository for archives from and about Europe, aggregates archival material from more than 30 countries and 25 languages – all searchable through one simple search engine.

In order to help researchers navigating this Babylon of languages, Archives Portal Europe have created an automated topic detection tool that expands the keyword search of a single user to create semantic connections with other documents in different languages. This testing session will allow users to preview the tool (currently in its alpha version), test it, and provide fundamental feedback for its development, and will have prizes! …”

Europeana and the Open GLAM survey – Douglas McCarthy

“There’s a lot of open access cultural heritage out there – well over 60,000,000 items – but naturally, it is dispersed across the thousands of digital platforms where GLAMs publish collections. This presents the Open GLAM survey with a challenge: how to keep track of new and updated open data? …”

 

Elisabeth Niggemann and Joke van der Leeuw-Roord reflect on their time on the Europeana Foundation board | Europeana Pro

“As the Europeana Foundation begins a new chapter of its story, with Martina Bagnoli taking on the role of Supervisory Board Chair, Elisabeth Niggemann and Joke van der Leeuw-Roord – two long-standing, highly respected and influential Supervisory Board members who will step down in early 2022 – reflect on their time working with and guiding the development of the Europeana Foundation….”

Europeana’s partnership with OCLC brings cultural heritage to new audiences | Europeana Pro

“In October, we were delighted that our partnership with the global library cooperative OCLC came to fruition by making millions of cultural heritage items from Europeana available through the database WorldCat. We speak to Tim Martin, Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations at OCLC, to find out more….”

Council agrees on a negotiating mandate on the Data Governance Act

“Both the EP and Council texts contain amendments concerning the role of Open Access Common resources. In response to the initial DGA consultation, we submitted feedback to the Commission where we highlighted the fundamental role played by these resources in the overall data ecosystem. To safeguard this key function, it is important that Open Access Commons resources are not negatively affected by the DGA.

The Parliament’s text contains an addition in recital 37a stipulating that the provisions established by the DGA are without prejudice to the ability of non-profit organizations to make data and content available to the public under open licenses. This amendment would clearly signal that Open Access Common resources fall outside the scope of the DGA. As such, it would recognize their key role in today’s digital ecosystem.

The Council text includes a new definition of data intermediaries stipulating that only for-profit services fall into this category. If included in the final compromise, this addition would ensure that existing Open Access Resources, like Wikipedia or Europeana – which are generally recognized as not-for-profit – are not subject to the requirements that the DGA will impose on intermediaries.

Taken together, these two modifications would ensure that Open Access Commons resources are not subject to additional requirements that could endanger their modus operandi. To safeguard their position in the DGA and increase legal clarity, both Council’s and Parliament’s contributions therefore need to be included in the final text….”

Consultation on a ‘Declaration of Digital Principles’ | Europeana Pro

“In this context, the Europeana Foundation, Network Association and Aggregators’ Forum, collectively representing the Europeana Initiative, strongly support a rights-based, people-centred approach to the concept of digital citizenship and the development of principles that promote a more equitable and democratic digital environment in which

basic liberties and rights are protected online, 

sovereignty of data is protected,

public institutions are empowered to function in the public interest, and 

people are able to participate more fully in the creation, functioning and potential of their digital environment.  …

The Europeana Initiative recognises the relevance and importance of these principles through its work with the cultural heritage sector, and we believe that we have useful insights to share on them. However we believe that a fundamental principle is missing – that of universal access to cultural heritage online. …

Europeana’s focus is on supporting the cultural heritage sector in its digital transformation  because access to cultural heritage is vital to humankind – to our knowledge and understanding of who we are, where we’ve come from and what we can become. Democratising access to cultural heritage online, in ways that support inclusivity, innovation, creativity, education and knowledge sharing, is at the heart of Europeana’s purpose….

We work with Europe’s cultural heritage institutions to ensure that digital cultural heritage is shared in formats and of a quality which allows use and reuse by researchers and educators, creatives and innovators, and all citizens. Our work promotes the use of digital technology that makes cultural heritage online accessible, traceable and trustworthy, which in turn means people can explore it, use it, be inspired by it and learn from it with confidence. It contributes to an open, knowledgeable and creative society….”

 

Europeana Collections

“At Europeana we work with thousands of European archives, libraries and museums to share cultural heritage for enjoyment, education and research.

Europeana Collections provides access to over 50 million digitised items – books, music, artworks and more – with sophisticated search and filter tools to help you find what you’re looking for.

Our dedicated thematic collections on art, fashion, music, photography and World War I contain galleries, blogs and exhibitions to inform and inspire.

To find out how cultural material gets from Europe’s institutions into Europeana, and the activities and challenges we’re working on right now, you can go behind the scenes on our sister site, Europeana Pro …”

Discover inspiring European cultural heritage | Europeana

“Europeana works with thousands of European archives, libraries and museums to share cultural heritage for enjoyment, education and research.

This website gives you access to millions of books, music, artworks and more – with sophisticated search and filter tools to help you find what you’re looking for. Register for a Europeana account today so that you can save liked items and create your own galleries.

Our online exhibitions, galleries and blogs aim to inform and inspire. Sign up to our monthly newsletter so you never miss out on our editorial highlights and latest news.

To find out about Europeana’s technical infrastructure, and how Europeana empowers the cultural heritage sector in its digital transformation, visit our sister site for professionals, Europeana Pro. …”

Submit your proposal for Europeana 2021 | Europeana Pro

“We are delighted to announce the launch of our call for proposals for Europeana 2021! Like last year, 70% of the conference programme will be open to professionals working in and around the cultural heritage sector to share expertise, knowledge and experience in varied sessions. Read on to find out about our call and how you can take part in one of the leading events of the year for those who work in, with and around digital cultural heritage in Europe….”

Europeana Digital Spring Programme: Not in Public Ownership, but Available for Public Use | Europeana Pro

“In this session, Bernadine Brocker Wieder holds a roundtable discussion on how to keep digital public access to works removed from museum collections. Bernadine proposes two methods for discussion on how digital technology can ensure that works are publicly available even after the gavel comes down at an auction. …”

Evaluating the Orphan Works Directive | Europeana Pro

“Throughout the survey, we noted that with two relatively overlapping systems in place, cultural heritage professionals are likely to use the one that provides the best solution, with the other one remaining mostly unused. We therefore recommended considering retracting the Orphan Works Directive. We also noted its clear flaws so that the same mistakes would not be repeated again. 

We noted the following: 

The diligent search for rights holders is problematic, with the sources it is mandatory to consult often irrelevant and difficult to access. Pertinent sources are sometimes not included.

The time and resources that an institution needs to dedicate to conducting a diligent search present challenges, particularly as after completing this process there is still no full guarantee that the institution will always be able to use the work lawfully. 

The very limited scope of the Directive in different types of works is a clear downside; including embedded works (for example, the multiple works contained in a scrapbook) in those whose rights holders have to be searched for makes the determination extremely time-consuming and almost impossible.  

The Directive does not provide a sufficient level of clarity regarding the compensation that rights holders can claim; this lack of clarity has strongly disincentivised cultural heritage professionals from relying on this scheme. 

The EUIPO Orphan Works database can be cumbersome when working with large datasets and is not sufficiently interoperable with the repositories of cultural heritage institutions. 

Having two overlapping schemes is likely to raise a lot of uncertainties for cultural heritage professionals, for instance when trying to assess which of the two options to rely on. The out of commerce works provisions in the Copyright in the Digital Single Market Directive, while tackling the same challenges, offer much better solutions and less cumbersome conditions, perhaps to a large extent given the lessons learned from the Orphan Works Directive, and we are hopeful that they will deliver their promise. …”