Position Opening: Programs & Operations Specialist – SPARC

“The Programs and Operations Specialist position assists the Chief Operating Officer in the operational management of SPARC, which encompasses policy, advocacy, community organizing, and professional development initiatives. The Specialist provides key organizational support to the SPARC team, including coordinating virtual and in-person events, facilitating memberships, supporting the Steering Committee and their election process, and as well as general operational support. The position also coordinates parts of SPARC’s ongoing community programming and contributes to meaningful and impactful work across the organization. 

This full-time, virtual position is a prime opportunity for a motivated professional seeking to advance openness and equity in research and education while gaining valuable operational non-profit experience alongside experienced advocates and leaders. Candidates for employment must be authorized to work in the United States. Candidates outside of the United States may be considered as a contractor….”

Subscribe-to-Open Community of Practice Statement on the OSTP ‘Nelson Memo’

The Subscribe to Open (S2O) Community of Practice is an informal collective of over forty pro-open publishers, libraries, consortia, funders, service providers, and other stakeholders committed to providing equitable and economically sustainable OA publishing. The S2O Community of Practice welcomes the US Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum on ensuring free, immediate, and equitable access to federally funded research.

International Open Access Week

” “Open for Climate Justice” is the theme for this year’s International Open Access Week (October 24-30).

Climate Justice is an explicit acknowledgement that the climate crisis has far-reaching effects, and the impacts are “not be[ing] borne equally or fairly, between rich and poor, women and men, and older and younger generations,” as the UN notes. These power imbalances also affect communities’ abilities to produce, disseminate, and use knowledge around the climate crisis. Openness can create pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and serve as a means to address the inequities that shape the impacts of climate change and our response to them.

This year’s focus on Climate Justice seeks to encourage connection and collaboration among the climate movement and the international open community. Sharing knowledge is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.

International Open Access Week is a time to coordinate across communities to make openness the default for research and to ensure that equity is at the center of this work. Selected by the Open Access Week Advisory Committee, this year’s theme is an opportunity to join together, take action, and raise awareness around how open enables climate justice. Open Access Week 2022 will be held from October 24th through the 30th; however, anyone is encouraged to host discussions and take action around “Open for Climate Justice” whenever is most suitable during the year and to adapt the theme and activities to their local context….”

Fact Sheet: White House OSTP Memo on Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research – SPARC

“On August 25, 2022, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP) issued a memorandum on Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research that will make taxpayer-funded research immediately available for the public to freely access and fully use. This new guidance calls on all federal agencies to generate policies that eliminate the current 12-month waiting period for access to the outputs of federally funded research, including articles and data. 

Specifically, the new policy guidance …”

Taxpayers to Get Immediate Access to Publicly Funded Research | SPARC

White House issues new guidance that will speed progress toward curing diseases, preventing pandemics, mitigating climate change, and more.

Washington, DC (August 25, 2022) – As a result of action taken today by the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP), taxpayer-funded research will be immediately available for the public to freely access and fully use. The new guidance issued to all federal agencies will eliminate the current 12-month waiting period for access to research outputs, including articles and data. 

“This is an enormous leap forward,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC, which has worked for more than two decades to accelerate open access to research. “For the first time, everyone will have free and immediate access to the results of all federally funded research to speed solutions for global challenges—from cancer to climate change.”

Currently, U.S. taxpayers spend over $80 billion on research each year. The government funds this research in order to advance discovery, spur the economy, accelerate innovation, and improve the lives of citizens. Yet too often the articles that report on the results of this research are locked behind expensive paywalls. The world learned how critical open access to research was during COVID-19. In 2020, paywalls were lifted for coronavirus articles, enabling scientists and doctors to access the latest research without delay and leading to the fastest development of a vaccine in history. 

Now, the public will be guaranteed the same fast access to information on countless other areas critical to their lives. Today’s action will unlock both the articles reporting on the results of federally funded research and the data needed to validate their results. It will enable scientists, entrepreneurs, educators, and communities to more quickly turn research into real-world applications that can benefit everyone.

[…]

 

Celebrating 100 #LeadOER Graduates: Stories from the Class of 2022 – SPARC

“Last month, SPARC was thrilled to announce the graduation of the 2021-2022 cohort of the Open Education Leadership Program, a year-long fellowship designed to help leaders deepen their knowledge of open practices and build a network of professional colleagues with shared interests. This year’s graduating class also represents some important milestones for the program itself: it marks the program’s five year anniversary and it brings our total graduate count above 100.

To celebrate these milestones, we wanted to highlight stories from this year’s graduating class.This year’s cohort was incredibly unique in the varied perspectives and expertise that each fellow brought to the program, and you can learn about all of this year’s capstones on the 2021-2022 cohort page. …”

Announcing SPARC’s Knowledge Equity Discussion Series – SPARC

“Our knowledge systems exclude many perspectives because legacies of injustice are built into their foundations. Racism, colonialism, and other forms of discrimination limit whose voices are heard, whose interests are prioritized, and whose knowledge counts. Openness can create pathways to more equitable systems of knowledge sharing; however, in pursuing this potential, it is important to explicitly recognize the ways these inequities are built into the foundations of academic systems.

To help situate the work of opening up research and education within this essential context, SPARC will host a discussion series to provide an introduction to broad concepts and considerations of epistemic injustice and knowledge equity in the areas of academic libraries and archives. These discussions will examine how universities, and thus academic libraries, are rooted in oppressive systems like white supremacy, racism, and settler colonialism, and how that is connected to our current work in libraries.

This public series will consist of four 60-minute discussions from the end of July through early September. …”

Elsevier’s Acquisition of Interfolio: Risks and Responses – SPARC: Community Owned Infrastructure | report JUN 29, 2022

“This analysis details the potential risks posed by Elsevier’s acquisition of Interfolio, what institutions should watch for, and proactive steps institutions can take to reduce the negative impacts of consolidation….”

International Open Access Week: Open for Climate Justice

““Open for Climate Justice” is the theme for this year’s International Open Access Week (October 24-30).

Climate Justice is an explicit acknowledgement that the climate crisis has far-reaching effects, and the impacts are “not be[ing] borne equally or fairly, between rich and poor, women and men, and older and younger generations,” as the UN notes. These power imbalances also affect communities’ abilities to produce, disseminate, and use knowledge around the climate crisis. Openness can create pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and serve as a means to address the inequities that shape the impacts of climate change and our response to them.

This year’s focus on Climate Justice seeks to encourage connection and collaboration among the climate movement and the international open community. Sharing knowledge is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.

International Open Access Week is a time to coordinate across communities to make openness the default for research and to ensure that equity is at the center of this work. Selected by the Open Access Week Advisory Committee, this year’s theme is an opportunity to join together, take action, and raise awareness around how open enables climate justice. Open Access Week 2022 will be held from October 24th through the 30th; however, anyone is encouraged to host discussions and take action around “Open for Climate Justice” whenever is most suitable during the year and to adapt the theme and activities to their local context….”

Michele Gibney Joins SPARC as Visiting Program Officer for Privacy & Surveillance – SPARC

“SPARC is pleased to welcome Michele Gibney as a Visiting Program Officer for Privacy & Surveillance. Michele is the Head of Publishing and Scholarship Support at University of the Pacific in California, where she manages the institutional repository, Scholarly Commons, and will spend about a quarter of her time in the newly established role.”

Inequities of Article Processing Charges: How the Oligopoly of Academic Publishers Profits from Open Access | Zenodo

“Since the early 2010s, more than half of peer-reviewed journal articles have been published by the so-called oligopoly of academic publishers: Elsevier, SAGE, Springer-Nature, Taylor & Francis and Wiley. These companies make immense profits from publishing scholarly journals, traditionally through subscriptions from academic libraries, the reader pays model. With more and more libraries cancelling so-called ‘Big Deals’, these publishers have expanded their revenues by making authors pay article processing charges (APCs) for open access (OA) publishing. The author-pays model creates inequities and barriers that exclude many from publishing, such as underrepresented groups or researchers from less-resourced countries. This presentation demonstrates the growth of gold and hybrid OA articles published in oligopoly journals indexed in the Web of Science and provides evidence of the amount of APCs paid in Canada and globally. It highlights the inequities of the author-pays model and discusses alternative routes to OA.”

Inequities of Article Processing Charges: How the Oligopoly of Academic Publishers Profits from Open Access – SPARC

“Since the early 2010s, more than half of peer-reviewed journal articles have been published by the so-called oligopoly of academic publishers: Elsevier, SAGE, Springer-Nature, Taylor & Francis and Wiley. These companies make immense profits from publishing scholarly journals, traditionally through subscriptions from academic libraries, the reader pays model. With more and more libraries cancelling so-called ‘Big Deals’, these publishers have expanded their revenues by making authors pay article processing charges (APCs) for open access (OA) publishing. The author-pays model creates inequities and barriers that exclude many from publishing, such as underrepresented groups or researchers from less-resourced countries. This presentation demonstrates the growth of gold and hybrid OA articles published in oligopoly journals indexed in the Web of Science and provides evidence of the amount of APCs paid in Canada and globally. It highlights the inequities of the author-pays model and discusses alternative routes to OA.”