Michele Gibney Joins SPARC as Visiting Program Officer for Privacy & Surveillance – SPARC

“SPARC is pleased to welcome Michele Gibney as a Visiting Program Officer for Privacy & Surveillance. Michele is the Head of Publishing and Scholarship Support at University of the Pacific in California, where she manages the institutional repository, Scholarly Commons, and will spend about a quarter of her time in the newly established role.”

Inequities of Article Processing Charges: How the Oligopoly of Academic Publishers Profits from Open Access | Zenodo

“Since the early 2010s, more than half of peer-reviewed journal articles have been published by the so-called oligopoly of academic publishers: Elsevier, SAGE, Springer-Nature, Taylor & Francis and Wiley. These companies make immense profits from publishing scholarly journals, traditionally through subscriptions from academic libraries, the reader pays model. With more and more libraries cancelling so-called ‘Big Deals’, these publishers have expanded their revenues by making authors pay article processing charges (APCs) for open access (OA) publishing. The author-pays model creates inequities and barriers that exclude many from publishing, such as underrepresented groups or researchers from less-resourced countries. This presentation demonstrates the growth of gold and hybrid OA articles published in oligopoly journals indexed in the Web of Science and provides evidence of the amount of APCs paid in Canada and globally. It highlights the inequities of the author-pays model and discusses alternative routes to OA.”

Inequities of Article Processing Charges: How the Oligopoly of Academic Publishers Profits from Open Access – SPARC

“Since the early 2010s, more than half of peer-reviewed journal articles have been published by the so-called oligopoly of academic publishers: Elsevier, SAGE, Springer-Nature, Taylor & Francis and Wiley. These companies make immense profits from publishing scholarly journals, traditionally through subscriptions from academic libraries, the reader pays model. With more and more libraries cancelling so-called ‘Big Deals’, these publishers have expanded their revenues by making authors pay article processing charges (APCs) for open access (OA) publishing. The author-pays model creates inequities and barriers that exclude many from publishing, such as underrepresented groups or researchers from less-resourced countries. This presentation demonstrates the growth of gold and hybrid OA articles published in oligopoly journals indexed in the Web of Science and provides evidence of the amount of APCs paid in Canada and globally. It highlights the inequities of the author-pays model and discusses alternative routes to OA.”

Draft Strategic Vision for U.S. Repositories Open for Community Consultation | comments by May 13, 2022

“COAR and SPARC are seeking comment from the repository community on a draft strategic vision for U.S. repositories. The strategic vision is intended to be aspirational yet achievable over time through active community collaboration within the U.S. Repository Network. This Network is envisioned as inclusive of all U.S. repositories rather than as a membership-based organization. The process for reaching this draft vision is outlined in the U.S Repository Network Initiative Progress Report. This public comment phase is the final step before finalizing the strategic vision. Please contribute your comments by May 13, 2022….

In addition to welcoming written comments, two live consultation sessions will also be offered via Zoom. Join these sessions to discuss the draft Strategic Vision live with other community members. Click the links below to register:

Wednesday, May 4, 2022, 2:00-3:00pm Eastern

Friday, May 6, 2022, 10:00-11:00am Eastern…”

Knowledge Equity and Justice Spring Seminar – Faculty of Information (iSchool) | University of Toronto

“The transmission and circulation of knowledge within information systems is not equitable. Certain kinds of knowledge, such as oral knowledge, or knowledge from certain peoples, such as Black or Indigenous peoples, are subject to forces of oppression. Furthermore, people can be treated unjustly for their inability to access knowledge. Theorist Miranda Fricker has described epistemic injustice as “wrong done to someone specifically in their capacity as a knower.” In contemporary information work, it is vital to understand the structural nature of epistemic injustice and move beyond surface-level work that aligns with many diversity and inclusion efforts to focus on knowledge justice.  

The Knowledge Equity and Justice Spring Seminar (KEJSS) is an intensive learning opportunity open to graduate students in Information Studies programs focusing on critical issues in epistemic justice relevant to Library and Information Sciences (LIS). Alongside guest speakers, participants will explore a series of topics that consider knowledge in relation to systems of power and race and the ways dominant culture systems oppress knowledge. Topics include scholarly communication, language and marginalization; Indigenous knowledge; and issues related to knowledge, citation and the Global South. This seminar invites participants to recognize knowledge as a site for justice and consider how to put knowledge justice into practice as future information professionals.

Sponsored by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, and convened by Professor Stacy Allison-Cassin, the seminar will take place online over three weeks. Through the workshop, students will have an opportunity to listen and be in dialogue with speakers and engage with critical readings and materials. The Seminar consists of five two-hour talks by guest speakers and two-hour introductory and closing sessions. Guest talks will be open to the public, with additional time reserved for seminar participants. Speakers include Leslie Chan (University of Toronto Scarborough); Priyank Chandra & Adrian Petterson (Faculty of Information, University of Toronto); Alan Corbiere (York University); Stefanie Haustein (uOttawa); and Anasuya Sengupta and Adele Vrana (Whose Knowledge?)….”

Public Access Language in the U.S. Innovation & Competition Act (USICA) – SPARC

“The House and Senate are currently considering a key legislative package aimed at bolstering America’s science and technology investments. The Senate bill, called the U.S. Innovation & Competition Act (USICA), includes language that supports providing public access to taxpayer-funded research results. 

Section 2527 of USICA would codify the current policy established by President Obama’s 2013 White House Memorandum on Increasing Public Access to Federally Funded Scientific Research by “directing federal agencies funding more than $100 million annually in research and development expenditures to provide for free online public access to federally-funded research no later than 12 months after publication in peer-reviewed journals, preferably sooner.” 

This language signals Congress’ continued support for making taxpayer-funded research readily available and fully usable by scientists and the public alike. SPARC supports maintaining this provision, even as we continue to advocate for a zero-embargo national open access policy. 

Current Status: On March 28th, the Senate cleared a procedural hurdle to begin the conference process with the House. The House is expected to officially call for a House-Senate Conference Committee to work out differences between the two bills in the coming days….”

SPARC / ORFG Webinar – Apr 20, 2022 – SPARC

“The Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) is a partnership of 24 leading philanthropic organizations committed to the open sharing of research outputs, representing the first community of practice of its kind. ORFG members have a shared belief that open research benefits society by accelerating the pace of discovery, reducing information-sharing gaps, encouraging innovation, and promoting reproducibility. The ORFG is an initiative of SPARC.

The ORFG has, since its inception in late 2016, worked to serve both as a community of practice and as an amplifier of the funder’s voice with respect to open research. Over the last year, the ORFG launched several new initiatives designed to advance open research within the membership, as well as enact systems-level change in the larger ecosystem. 

In this webinar, the ORFG team will share information on some of these initiatives, including the Open Access Funder Cohort Program, the Open & Equitable Model Funding Program, the ORFG-led National Academies Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science, and the Higher Education Leadership Initiative for Open Scholarship (HELIOS). An open Q&A will follow….”

SPARC Announces Knowledge Equity Seminar for LIS Students – SPARC

“In cooperation with the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, SPARC is sponsoring the Knowledge Equity and Justice Spring Seminar (KEJSS), an intensive learning opportunity open to graduate students in Information Studies programs that will focus on critical issues in epistemic justice relevant to Library and Information Studies.

Convened by Dr. Stacy Allison-Cassin, the seminar will take place online over three weeks from May 9-26, 2022 and will cover topics including scholarly communication, language and marginalization, Indigenous knowledge, and issues related to knowledge, citation and the Global South. The seminar will invite participants to recognize knowledge as a site for justice and consider how to put knowledge justice into practice as future information professionals. 

Seminar guest speakers will include Leslie Chan (University of Toronto Scarborough); Priyank Chandra (Faculty of Information, University of Toronto); Alan Corbiere (York University); Stefanie Haustein (uOttawa); and, Anasuya Sengupta & Adele Vrana (Whose Knowledge?). These guest lectures will be open to the community, and SPARC will provide additional information about joining each in the next month….”

US Repository Network Progress Report (public) – Google Docs

“The U.S. Repository Network initiative is a partnership between the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) aiming to catalyze a new U.S. network. As part of its Modernizing the Global Repository Network initiative, COAR has partnered with SPARC to hire a Visiting Program Officer for U.S. Repository Network (VPO) to assist in breaking down institutional silos and developing a more cohesive approach and greater collaboration around repositories in the U.S. This Network is envisioned as inclusive of all U.S. repositories rather than as a membership-based organization.

 

To date, the focus has been convening a high-level expert group of both Library Deans/Directors and IR managers from academic institutions committed to empowering the role of repositories to develop a strategic vision for repositories in the United States. The expert group includes sixty-three individuals from academic institutions of various sizes and geographic location and several consortial leaders. The expert group was first surveyed to gather their thoughts on the vision for repositories and the priority activities of a U.S. repository network. Then the expert group met in smaller groups of 10-12 people and were led through a series of activities to share and further probe the survey results. The results of the survey and small group ideation sessions are shared in this progress report….”

 

Visiting Program Officer for Negotiations

“Over the past three years, SPARC’s Negotiation Community of Practice has worked to meaningfully address information asymmetries between libraries and vendors, support libraries in negotiating better deals, and assist libraries in walking away from big deal packages. At the heart of the community of practice are working groups that collaborate to produce resources addressing key areas related to negotiation, including data analysis, mitigating cancellation impact, reinvestment, and stakeholder engagement. To complement the work of these groups, the community also hosts regular webcasts on emerging developments and topics of interest as well as an ongoing series of vendor-specific negotiation discussions….”

An ENOEL Toolkit: Open Education Benefits | Zenodo

Welcome to the ENOEL Open Education Benefits Toolkit! It is a set of tools (slides, leaflets, and Twitter cards) prepared by The European Network of Open Education Librarians (ENOEL). The toolkit aims to help raise awareness of the importance of Open Education and it points out benefits for students, teachers, institutions, and society.

All templates are under a CC BY licence, enabling you to use and adapt them to your specific needs. Depending on your circumstances, you may choose to use Twitter cards in your campaign, or add one of the slides in your presentation, or even print out one or more leaflets and hang them on a wall of your local library. 

We invite you to pick and choose, adapt and reuse! Help us raise awareness about the benefits of Open Education!

How to use it?

The set contains three types of tools:

1. OE Benefits – ENOEL slides 

2. OE Benefits – ENOEL leaflets 

3. OE Benefits – ENOEL Twitter cards

Look at the second slide in each deck for a detailed description of how the files are organized and how they might be used. We’d love to hear how you have reused them: oer@sparceurope.org