Data sharing: what do we know and where can we go?

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the what about and the why of data sharing.

The recent OSTP “Nelson memo” served as a re-focus on data as a first class research output. But maybe that’s a misrepresentation for those of us who think ‘hold on, we’ve been focused on data this whole time!?’ Well here’s a chance to learn from and with a group of experts who are thinking carefully about data sharing: what that means from different perspectives, tangible steps to take and policies to make around data, and what we can do next in our communities of practice. Attendees are more than welcome to bring their own perspectives! The webinar will be chaired by Rachael Lammey. We welcome our panelists: Sarah Lippincott will give a repository perspective with insights into where data is going post Nelson Memo and NIH Policy. Aravind Venkatesan will share the thinking, data science and workflows employed at EuropePMC to support data linking. Shelley Stall will talk about how AGU are leading the line with their data policies, and Kathleen Gregory will conclude by considering researchers’ perspectives regarding sharing and reusing data.”

The ‘OA market’ – what is healthy? Part 1 – OASPA

“I joined OASPA in the summer of 2022. Considering the point of representation, and the need to reflect a greater diversity of viewpoints, particularly from those outside of Europe, I’ve been gathering non-European perspectives on the ‘OA market’ work done so far. 

I had email conversations and in-person conversations via Zoom with 15 individuals. All participants were asked to review the work completed by OASPA in 2021 (as documented in the issue brief and reflections). Feedback was specifically sought about the ‘OA market’ and the three areas of focus outlined above….

1. Publishing can be a cost rather than a revenue/profit source…

2. Wide access is being achieved in ways that are not always recognized…

3. APCs and OA are (not?) the same…

4. How can libraries focus on content acquisition and (OA) publishing?…

5. Pricing is a huge problem…

6. “Brain drain” and (Western) market gain…

7. Equity first for better health and diversity…”

 

Webinar: Data sharing: what do we know and where can we go? – OASPA

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the what about and the why of data sharing.

The recent OSTP “Nelson memo” served as a re-focus on data as a first class research output. But maybe that’s a misrepresentation for those of us who think ‘hold on, we’ve been focused on data this whole time!?’ Well here’s a chance to learn from and with a group of experts who are thinking carefully about data sharing: what that means from different perspectives, tangible steps to take and policies to make around data, and what we can do next in our communities of practice. Attendees are more than welcome to bring their own perspectives!…”

CHECKLIST FOR OPEN ACCESS PUBLISHERS ON IMPLEMENTING THE UNESCO RECOMMENDATION ON OPEN SCIENCE

“This document is part of the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit, designed to support implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. It has been produced in partnership with the Open  Access  Scholarly  Publishing  Association  (OASPA),  a  diverse  community  of  organizations  engaged  in  open  scholarship.  The  aim  is  to  provide  practical  assistance  to  the  open  access  publishing  community  to  better  understand  the  Recommendation  by  highlighting  the  areas  that apply to open access publishers who wish to support its implementation….”

 

Welcoming Radboud University Press as an OASPA member – OASPA

“We recently welcomed Radboud University Press as an OASPA member in the Small Professional Publisher category. The Press joins a growing list of over 200 OASPA members. 

We asked  Natalia Grygierczyk, Director, a few questions so we could learn more about Radboud University Press and its connection to open scholarship and the decision to become an OASPA member….”

Launch of the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit

“Dr Lidia Brito, UNESCO Regional Director for Southern Africa, launched the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit at the Open Science Day (7 December) that took place on the margins of the World Science Forum 2022 in Cape Town, South Africa. 

The Toolkit is a collection of resources (guides, policy briefs, factsheets and indexes) designed to support implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. The Toolkit is a living document, and will be updated to reflect new developments in open science and the status of implementation of the Recommendation.

Iryna Kuchma, EIFL Open Access Programme Manager, participated in five working groups that developed the Toolkit. In addition, EIFL specifically contributed to two Checklists in the Toolkit, in collaboration with partners: the Checklist for universities on implementing the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, in collaboration with LIBSENSE (in English and in French), and the Checklist for open access publishers on implementing the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, in collaboration with OASPA (Open Access Scholarly Publishing Association) (in English and in French). …”

Webinar recording: Rights Retention for Books and Book Chapters, November 23, 2022 | OASPA @ YouTube

Rights retention is gaining traction as a way to achieve open access without having to pay author-facing publication charges, for example by enabling the distribution of manuscripts through institutional repositories.

There are at least two common methods of rights retention – the Harvard approach (first adopted in 2008) and the Plan S approach (first announced in 2020)– practised by institutions or individual authors worldwide. A more recent development is the national implementation of rights retention, such as the 2022 decree in the Republic of Slovenia stipulating that exclusive authors’ rights of publicly funded research can no longer be transferred to publishers.

The focus of such rights retention policies tends to be on articles in scholarly journals. Is there a good reason why we would not consider doing the same for the manuscripts of books or book chapters? Do publishers object more to rights retention for these types of publication than for article manuscripts? Would it not be a good idea to make haste with a more general rights retention policy for books and book chapters now that more and more funders demand open access for other publication types than journal articles?

The webinar was chaired by Sally Rumsey (cOAlition S) and speakers include Lucy Barnes (Open Book Publishers), Per Pippin Aspaas (University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway) and Peter Suber (Harvard University).

Webinar structure (60 minutes)

Introduction by chair, Sally Rumsey
Panelist presentations 

Peter Suber (Harvard University)
Per Pippin Aspaas (University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway)
Lucy Barnes (Open Book Publishers)

Discussion and Q&A

 

Fully OA Publishers – The Future of Open – Fully OA Publishers

The Fully OA blog was born out of the OASPA Interest Group of Fully OA journal organizations. The purpose of the group was to provide a platform for exchange of ideas and, where appropriate, collaboration amongst publishers that only publish Open Access content. The aim of the group – and now of this blog – is to provide unity, not by creating a single voice, but by bringing together a diversity of different voices and perspectives.

Rights Retention for Books and Book Chapters

“Other timezones: 8.00 am Pacific Time | 10.00 am Central Time | 11.00 am Eastern Time | 12.00 pm Brasilia Time | 5.00 pm Central European Time | 4.00 pm West Africa Time | 5.00 pm South Africa Standard Time | 8.30 pm India Standard Time | 11 pm Central Indonesia Time

Rights retention is gaining traction as a way to achieve open access without having to pay author-facing publication charges, for example by enabling the distribution of manuscripts through institutional repositories.

There are at least two common methods of rights retention – the Harvard approach (first adopted in 2008) and the Plan S approach (first announced in 2020)– practised by institutions or individual authors worldwide. A more recent development is the national implementation of rights retention, such as the 2022 decree in the Republic of Slovenia stipulating that exclusive authors’ rights of publicly funded research can no longer be transferred to publishers.

The focus of such rights retention policies tends to be on articles in scholarly journals. Is there a good reason why we would not consider doing the same for the manuscripts of books or book chapters? Do publishers object more to rights retention for these types of publication than for article manuscripts? Would it not be a good idea to make haste with a more general rights retention policy for books and book chapters now that more and more funders demand open access for other publication types than journal articles?…”

Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing – OASPA

“The Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), and the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) are scholarly organisations that have seen an increase in the number, and broad range in the quality, of membership applications. Our organisations have collaborated to identify principles of transparency and best practice for scholarly publications and to clarify that these principles form the basis of the criteria by which suitability for membership is assessed by COPE, DOAJ and OASPA, and part of the criteria on which membership applications are evaluated by WAME. Each organisation also has their own, additional criteria which are used when evaluating applications. The organisations will not share lists of or journals that failed to demonstrate that they met the criteria for transparency and best practice.

This is the third version of a work in progress (published January 2018); the first version was made available by OASPA in December 2013 and a second version in June 2015. We encourage its wide dissemination and continue to welcome feedback on the general principles and the specific criteria. Background on the organisations is below….”

Revised principles of transparency and best practice released | OASPA

A revised version of the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing has been released by four key scholarly publishing organizations today. These guiding principles are intended as a foundation for best practice in scholarly publishing to help existing and new journals reach the best possible standards. 

The fourth edition of the Principles represents a collective effort between the four organizations to align the principles with today’s scholarly publishing landscape. The last update was in 2018, and the scholarly publishing landscape has changed. Guidance is provided on the information that should be made available on websites, peer review, access, author fees and publication ethics. The principles also cover ownership and management, copyright and licensing, and editorial policies. They stress the need for inclusivity in scholarly publishing and emphasize that editorial decisions should be based on merit and not affected by factors such as the origins of the manuscript and the nationality, political beliefs or religion of the author.

 

Fully OA Publishers Live on OA Switchboard – OASPA

“OASPA founded OA Switchboard in 2020 and remains a proud strategic partner. It has been wonderful to see the OA Switchboard develop as a truly collaborative initiative and we are happy to share news that a number of fully open access (OA) publishers have now implemented their connection to OA Switchboard.

OA Switchboard is set up for all publishing business models but one of the great benefits is that it gives visibility to smaller publishers and fully OA publishers who most often lack the opportunities to make direct publishing agreements with institutions. This is one of the main reasons OASPA supported the initiative, so it is great to see these publishers go live with OA Switchboard. The born OA publishers now connected include AboutScience, Beilstein-Institut, Copernicus, eLife, Hindawi, JMIR Publications and PLOS. …”

Support OASPA – OASPA

“OASPA has introduced a new supporter category for organisations and individuals who are supportive of OASPA’s mission and open access goals, but do not fit into our membership categories as they are not themselves publishing or specifically enabling OA publishing to happen. We know that there is a significant and growing community who support our work and are interested in our events and activities.

OASPA is a small organisation funded solely by membership dues, conference registration funds and event sponsorship. These funds have enabled us to run a broad program of activities, to continue to build our community around open scholarship, to be responsive to community questions and needs, and to focus our efforts on the important work to realise OASPA’s mission. You can read more about our recent activities and our funding in this blog post.

We wish to engage more closely with organisations and individuals doing work that fits with our mission and to work with and learn from each other so have enabled this new way to support our work and connect with others working in open scholarship….”