Self-archiving options on social networks: a review of options

Abstract:  Purpose

 

The purpose of the study is to investigate the extent to which academic librarians in Nigerian universities utilize self-archiving options to make their research papers visible globally.

Design/methodology/approach

 

An online survey was designed using SurveyMonkey software to collect data from 394 academic librarians in Nigerian universities.

Findings

 

The study revealed that the academic librarians in Nigerian universities know and actually use self-archiving options such as ResearchGate, institutional repository and academia.edu to self-archive their publications. While, self-archiving platforms like Kudos, Mendeley.com and personal websites/servers are not popularly used by the academic librarians. Factors such as increased exposure to previously published work broadens the dissemination of academic research generally, which increases institutions’ visibility, were among the options the academic librarians indicated as very important factors that motivate them to contribute their scholarly output to self-archiving options.

Practical implications

 

The study called for academic librarians in developing countries to voluntarily sign-up to register with self-archiving options such as ResearchGate, Kudos, Mendeley.com, Academia.edu and others to enable them to self-archive their published papers for access globally by students, researchers.

Originality/value

 

Self-archiving of papers by authors will lead to an increased visibility of the author and possible citation of the work and chances of collaboration with international colleagues for research projects.

Scipedia – Communicating science

“Publish in our open access journals or collections. Upload your work created in LaTeX, Word or Google Docs using our file import tools. Use Scipedia’s online collaborative editor to improve its content and to insert supplementary material such as video, datasets, models and more….”

Scienceroot | The first Blockchain-Based Scientific Ecosystem

“Our goal is to create an ecosystem where anyone in the scientific community around the globe will have the ability to gather funding, interact, discuss research ideas, collaborate and in the end, publish their work through a more efficient, intuitive and transparent platform….

The current system of attaining funding, collaboration, and publishing findings is outdated and inefficient. Scienceroot aims to leverage the decentralizing power of blockchain technology and incentivizing power of cryptoeconomics to solve the biggest problems with the status quo….”

Decentralised Authoring, Annotations and Notifications for a Read-Write Web with dokieli

Abstract:  Decentralising the creation, publication, and annotation of hypertext documents provides authors with a technological guarantee for independence of any publication authority. While the Web was designed as a decentralised environment, individual authors still lack the ability to conveniently author and publish documents, and to engage in social interactions with documents of others in a truly decentralised fashion. We present dokieli, a fully decentralised, browser-based authoring and annotation platform with built-in support for social interactions, through which people retain the ownership of and sovereignty over their data. The resulting “living” documents are interoperable and independent of dokieli since they follow standards and best practices, such as HTML+RDFa for a fine-grained semantic structure, Linked Data Platform for personal data storage, and Linked Data Notifications for updates. This article describes dokieli’s architecture and implementation, demonstrating advanced document authoring and interaction without a single point of control. Such an environment provides the right technological conditions for independent publication of scientific articles, news, and other works that benefit from diverse voices and open interactions.

Decentralised Authoring, Annotations and Notifications for a Read-Write Web with dokieli

Abstract:  Decentralising the creation, publication, and annotation of hypertext documents provides authors with a technological guarantee for independence of any publication authority. While the Web was designed as a decentralised environment, individual authors still lack the ability to conveniently author and publish documents, and to engage in social interactions with documents of others in a truly decentralised fashion. We present dokieli, a fully decentralised, browser-based authoring and annotation platform with built-in support for social interactions, through which people retain the ownership of and sovereignty over their data. The resulting “living” documents are interoperable and independent of dokieli since they follow standards and best practices, such as HTML+RDFa for a fine-grained semantic structure, Linked Data Platform for personal data storage, and Linked Data Notifications for updates. This article describes dokieli’s architecture and implementation, demonstrating advanced document authoring and interaction without a single point of control. Such an environment provides the right technological conditions for independent publication of scientific articles, news, and other works that benefit from diverse voices and open interactions.

FOAM / FOAMed – Free Open Access Medical Education

“The term FOAM was coined in June 2012 in a pub in Dublin, over a pint of Guinness during ICEM 2012 [watch the Dublin video]. This page is dedicated to collating the resources that healthcare professionals and students can access to take part in the FOAM movement….FOAM is a collection of resources, a community and an ethos. The FOAM community spontaneously emerged from the collection of constantly evolving, collaborative and interactive open access medical education resources being distributed on the web with one objective — to make the world a better place. FOAM is independent of platform or media — it includes blogs, podcasts, tweets, Google hangouts, online videos, text documents, photographs, facebook groups, and a whole lot more….”

Commentary: LinkedIn-Hiq Labs Case Will Have Implications on Data | Fortune

“The case hinges on questions of who owns a piece of data and the circumstances under which the information can be viewed as residing in the public domain, accessible by all and sundry. The appeals court judges may rule that LinkedIn owns exclusive rights to the data, which would not have been compiled without the entrepreneurial talents of LinkedIn’s founders. Conversely, the judges may conclude that since LinkedIn users set their profiles to “public,” placing them in full view of search engines and general web surfers, they are giving companies like hiQ free rein to view and use the data as they see fit….”

How might we get to a new model of mathematical publishing? | Gowers’s Weblog

“I am more interested in whether mathematicians really need journal articles at all, now that we have the internet….I think that journals still have a vital role to play, even though the internet exists. However, like many people, I do not think it is at all obvious that they will continue to have a vital role to play, so I’d like to discuss two questions. 1. If we didn’t have journals, then what might we have instead? 2. How could the change from journals to whatever replaces them actually take place? …What I think could work is something like a cross between the arXiv, a social networking site, Amazon book reviews, and Mathoverflow….”

Remarq® – RedLink

“Article sharing that counts.

Let your users share articles with coworkers and colleagues, all while capturing the usage data associated with shared use. Remarq® refines recommendations based on sharing, as well, making your site a useful portal to the literature while keeping users engaged.

  • Stop content leakage to third-party sites
  • Give your PDFs new life and importance
  • Make your site a stronger community hub…”

 

CIELO – A Collaborative Informatics Environment for Learning on healthcare Outcomes

“CIELO stands for “Collaborative Informatics Environment for Learning on Health Outcomes” and is a collaborative tool that enables health researchers, data scientists, policy analysts, and citizen scientists to share software and data and connect with peers, colleagues and specialists to improve the timeliness, efficiency and transparency of data analysis….CIELO fosters multi-disciplinary collaboration in health analytics, allowing users to share and collaborate across distributed research activities.

Access health analytics data and code.

Connect with health researchers, policy analysts, informaticians, citizen scientists, and others. … “