LitCovid – NCBI – NLM – NIH

“LitCovid is a curated literature hub for tracking up-to-date scientific information about the 2019 novel Coronavirus. It is the most comprehensive resource on the subject, providing a central access to 1121 (and growing) research articles in PubMed. The articles are updated daily and are further categorized by different research topics and geographic locations for improved access….”

Keep up with the latest coronavirus research

“An open-resource literature hub known as LitCovid curates the most comprehensive collection of international research papers so far on the new coronavirus disease COVID-19 (see go.nature.com/3almd5p). Developed with the support of the US National Institutes of Health’s intramural research programme, LitCovid is updated daily with newly published articles. The aim is to provide timely insight from the scientific literature into the biology of the virus and the diagnosis and management of those who have been infected.

LitCovid has a more sophisticated search function than existing resources. It identifies roughly 35% more relevant articles than do conventional keyword-based searches for entries such as ‘COVID-19’ or ‘nCOV’. Furthermore, the articles are categorized by topic — overview, disease mechanism, transmission dynamics, treatment, case report and epidemic forecasting — as well as by geographic location for visualization on a world map…..”

Keep up with the latest coronavirus research

“An open-resource literature hub known as LitCovid curates the most comprehensive collection of international research papers so far on the new coronavirus disease COVID-19 (see go.nature.com/3almd5p). Developed with the support of the US National Institutes of Health’s intramural research programme, LitCovid is updated daily with newly published articles. The aim is to provide timely insight from the scientific literature into the biology of the virus and the diagnosis and management of those who have been infected.

LitCovid has a more sophisticated search function than existing resources. It identifies roughly 35% more relevant articles than do conventional keyword-based searches for entries such as ‘COVID-19’ or ‘nCOV’. Furthermore, the articles are categorized by topic — overview, disease mechanism, transmission dynamics, treatment, case report and epidemic forecasting — as well as by geographic location for visualization on a world map…..”

Federal Toxmap Shutters, Raising the Ire of Pollution Researchers

“Fifteen years ago the U.S. National Library of Medicine launched Toxmap, a free, interactive online application that combines pollution data from at least a dozen U.S. government sources. A Toxmap user could pan and zoom across a map of the United States sprinkled with thousands of blue and red dots, with each blue dot representing a factory, coal-fired power plant, or other facility that has released certain toxic chemicals into the environment, and each red dot marking a Superfund program site — “some of the nation’s most contaminated land,” according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Toxmap allowed users to pull up detailed EPA data for each toxic release site, and to overlay other information, such as mortality statistics, onto those maps. And it’s precisely those capabilities that earned Toxmap a devoted following among researchers, students, activists, and other people keen to identify sources of pollution in their communities.

Those capabilities appear to no longer be available to the public.

Earlier this year, with little explanation, the NLM announced that it would be “retiring” the Toxmap website on Dec. 16, 2019. The library did not respond directly to queries on Monday about what was meant by “retiring,” but by Tuesday morning, the Toxmap website had been taken down and visitors to the former URL were met with a message acknowledging the closure and pointing visitors to other potential sources of information. (An archived version of the old Toxmap landing page is preserved at the Internet Archive.) …”

TOXMAP, Federal Database Allowing Public to Track U.S. Pollution, Shut Down After 15 Years by Trump Administration

“TOXMAP, an interactive map that allowed public users to pinpoint sources of pollution, was pulled from the internet after 15 years. Hosted by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the website was beneficial to researchers and advocates.

While most of the information from TOXMAP has been dispersed to other websites, some of the information has disappeared….”

How to add academic journal articles to PubMed: An overview for publishers

“If you work with journals in the biomedical or life sciences, getting the articles you publish added to PubMed to make them more discoverable is likely one of your top goals. But, you may be wondering how to go about it.

We caught up with PubMed Central (PMC) Program Manager Kathryn Funk to get answers to some of the most common questions that we hear from journal publishers about PubMed and the related literature databases at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), MEDLINE and PMC. Read on to learn more about how the PubMed database works and how to apply to have a journal included in MEDLINE or PMC in order to make its articles searchable via PubMed….”

Dr. Donald Lindberg, 85, Dies; Opened Medical Research to the World – The New York Times

“Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, who as director of the National Library of Medicine — the world’s largest — computerized its vast holdings and made them accessible to researchers around the world, died on Aug. 17 at a hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 85….

Dr. Lindberg was a leader in medical informatics, the science of using computer technology to improve human health and the delivery of health care services. As the longtime leader of the library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, he modernized, expanded and transformed a trove of material, some of which dates to the 12th century.

“He changed fundamentally the way biomedical knowledge and health information is collected, organized, and made available for public use — in small villages in Alaska and Mali as well as in laboratories of Nobel prizewinners,” the library’s board of regents said in a resolution when he retired in 2015….”

Dr. Donald Lindberg, 85, Dies; Opened Medical Research to the World – The New York Times

“Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, who as director of the National Library of Medicine — the world’s largest — computerized its vast holdings and made them accessible to researchers around the world, died on Aug. 17 at a hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 85….

Dr. Lindberg was a leader in medical informatics, the science of using computer technology to improve human health and the delivery of health care services. As the longtime leader of the library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, he modernized, expanded and transformed a trove of material, some of which dates to the 12th century.

“He changed fundamentally the way biomedical knowledge and health information is collected, organized, and made available for public use — in small villages in Alaska and Mali as well as in laboratories of Nobel prizewinners,” the library’s board of regents said in a resolution when he retired in 2015….”

Dr. Donald Lindberg, 85, Dies; Opened Medical Research to the World – The New York Times

“Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, who as director of the National Library of Medicine — the world’s largest — computerized its vast holdings and made them accessible to researchers around the world, died on Aug. 17 at a hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 85….

Dr. Lindberg was a leader in medical informatics, the science of using computer technology to improve human health and the delivery of health care services. As the longtime leader of the library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, he modernized, expanded and transformed a trove of material, some of which dates to the 12th century.

“He changed fundamentally the way biomedical knowledge and health information is collected, organized, and made available for public use — in small villages in Alaska and Mali as well as in laboratories of Nobel prizewinners,” the library’s board of regents said in a resolution when he retired in 2015….”

Publisher Liaison, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine

“Responsibilities

Serve as a Technical Information Specialist responsible to coordinate the review and selection of materials, develop and maintain related processes, and contribute to policy formulation for a premier biomedical citation database and journal archive.
Interpret and communicate NLM policies to high level publishers’ representatives, organizations, and information centers in the U.S. and worldwide.
Provide technical consultation and support to facilitate the provision of biomedical information through NLM services.
Serves as a technical expert on journal publishing trends and scholarly communication issues .
Independently prepare written correspondence, reports, and news announcements to explain or publicize NLM’s policies for the review, selection, indexing and archiving of biomedical literature.
Coordinate and actively contribute to the meetings of the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC), a U.S. government federal advisory committee responsible for reviewing and recommending journals for inclusion in MEDLINE….”

PubMed Commons to be Discontinued | NCBI Insights

PubMed Commons has been a valuable experiment in supporting discussion of published scientific literature. The service was first introduced as a pilot project in the fall of 2013 and was reviewed in 2015. Despite low levels of use at that time, NIH decided to extend the effort for another year or two in hopes that participation would increase. Unfortunately, usage has remained minimal, with comments submitted on only 6,000 of the 28 million articles indexed in PubMed. While many worthwhile comments were made through the service during its 4 years of operation, NIH has decided that the low level of participation does not warrant continued investment in the project, particularly given the availability of other commenting venues.

MedPix

“MedPix® is a free open-access online database of medical images, teaching cases, and clinical topics, integrating images and textual metadata including over 12,000 patient case scenarios, 9,000 topics, and nearly 59,000 images. Our primary target audience includes physicians and nurses, allied health professionals, medical students, nursing students and others interested in medical knowledge….We are actively seeking new case contributions – which become a digital publication of MedPix® at the National Library of Medicine. Please join us in supporting one of the world’s largest open-access teaching files….”

The NIH Public Access Policy (April 2012)

“NO HARM TO PUBLISHERS IS EVIDENT: • Publishers retain up to a 12?month embargo on NIH?funded papers before they are made available to the public without charge under fair use principles. • The Public Access requirement took effect in 2008. While the U.S. economy has suffered a downturn during the time period 2007 to 2011, scientific publishing has grown: – The number of journals dedicated to publishing biological sciences/agriculture articles and medicine/health articles increased 15% and 19%, respectively.5 – The average subscription prices of biology journals and health sciences journals increased 26% and 23%, respectively.6 – Publishers forecast increases to the rate of growth of the medical journal market, from 4.5% in 2011 to 6.3% in 2014.7 …

KEY FACTS ABOUT PMC: • Over 2.4 million articles are now in PMC. In addition to the NIH?funded papers deposited into PMC, publishers voluntarily deposit more than 100,000 papers per year. • Every weekday, 700,000 users access the database, retrieving over 1.5 million articles. • Based on internet addresses, an estimated 25% of users are from universities, 17% are from companies, and 40% from the general public …”

New NLM chief wants to focus on data, consumer friendliness – MedCity NewsMedCity News

“Print media may be withering on the vine, but don’t write off libraries just yet. In fact, the director of the National Library of Medicine sees a bright future for medical libraries — as long as they evolve.

‘What the library was, which was a stable repository of knowledge, is no longer possible,’ NLM Director Patricia Flatley Brennan said Tuesday in a keynote address to the American Medical Informatics Association Annual Symposium in Chicago. ‘Now the big action is moving upstream to the data.'”

Open access is displacing interlibrary loan.

“See the slide presentation given by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the 2014 conference of the Medical Library Association. The slides report the results of a survey of users of DOCLINE, the NLM’s interlibrary loan (ILL) service….  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/docline/presentations/MLA_2014_DOCLINE_Update.pptx

Slide 34 shows that OA is the leading cause of the decline of ILL. Slide 36 shows that for these heavy ILL users, OA is the 2nd most common method for obtaining new literature, after ILL itself. The publisher’s web site is 5th, the author 6th, and pay-per-view 8th. ILL and OA are the only two methods used by more than 10% of respondents.”