Let us know how you’re using our library

“If you check out books from Internet Archive’s lending library, we’d love to hear from you. We are gathering testimonials so that we can describe the impact of our lending library. With your consent below, we will use your feedback in blog posts and other communications about the impact of the Internet Archive’s collection and controlled digital lending, the library practice that powers our lending library. Learn more about our Empowering Libraries campaign: http://blog.archive.org/empoweringlibraries/ ”

Open Access Week at Communications Biology | Nature Research Cancer Community

“With regards to the benefits of Open Access publishing, Dr Duffy states:

‘Open access publishing has made our research findings widely available. This is particularly important for our research as fibropapillomatosis tumors affect sea turtles worldwide across tropical and subtropical regions. Therefore, many of those interested in combatting the disease are not necessarily associated with well-funded academic institutions and as such have limited access to research that is kept behind a paywall. Many groups tackling fibropapillomatosis are grassroots conservation organizations and rehabilitation facilities, and every dollar goes towards their conservation and animal rehabilitation objectives. Most organizations of this kind simply do not have the resources to pay for access to the most up-to-date research findings. Additionally, as some of our research is funded by charitable organizations and government funders (i.e. tax dollars), putting the results behind a paywall rather than making them available to all might be considered somewhat unfair.  Open access enables the maximum return on those investments, as conservation and research groups can continue to equally benefit and build on this information. Such discrepancies between public funding and private access are partially recognized by the growing number of funders who require findings to either be published in open access journals, or at least have non-formatted versions of manuscripts available in public repositories. …”

Even More Impacts of the National Emergency Library and Controlled Digital Lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“This is the third part in a series of testimonials from patrons who used the National Emergency Library and continue to use controlled digital lending to borrow books from our library (you can read the previous posts here and here). If you’d like to share your story of how you used the NEL while it was open, or how you are still using our lending library today, please leave a testimonial….”

Even More Impacts of the National Emergency Library and Controlled Digital Lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“This is the third part in a series of testimonials from patrons who used the National Emergency Library and continue to use controlled digital lending to borrow books from our library (you can read the previous posts here and here). If you’d like to share your story of how you used the NEL while it was open, or how you are still using our lending library today, please leave a testimonial….”

How open science creates new knowledge – Russell T. Warne

“During the 2010s, I gradually adopted open science practices. With each study I started, I began to take more and more steps to make my research transparent. I started uploading my data, documenting analysis procedures, pre-registering my work, and taking other steps to ensure my research was transparent. After adding components of open science to my work, I finally decided in fall 2017 that I would conduct a fully open science project. My only regret was that I didn’t fully embrace open science earlier….

This article is the result of the first fully open science study of my career, though I had adopted pieces of open science beforehand. Here is what I learned from this study: …”

Sharing Experiences of Journal Cancellations on a Rapid Timeline – SPARC

“In discussions with the SPARC Journal Negotiation Community of Practice, many institutions have discussed needing to prepare for cancellations on a rapid timeline. On June 18, SPARC provided a forum for librarians who recently led their institutions through a fast-tracked Big Deal cancellation to share how they navigated the process. Building on our Big Deal cancellation debrief in May, this event focused on how the process of preparing for and executing a cancellation differs when the timeline needs to be compressed to a few months.

The webinar was moderated by Jaclyn McLean of the University of Saskatchewan and featured Megan Heady from West Virginia University and Kristin Henrich from the University of Idaho.

Budget cuts are forcing many to rethink their contracts with publishers and, in some cases, pivot quickly. Both West Virginia University and the University of Idaho recently had to react to state-imposed budget reductions and prepare for a new way of operating. In the wake of COVID-19, many institutions anticipate financial pressures that could result in accelerated efforts to end their Big Deals – a process that may be complicated by remote work….”

More Impacts of the National Emergency Library – Internet Archive Blogs

“Following our previous post, we have continued to receive messages about the impact of the National Emergency Library before it closed last week. If you’d like to share your story of how you used the NEL, please leave a testimonial.

The following statements are condensed from testimonials sent to the Internet Archive:…”

Lettre de la science ouverte (The beautiful stories of open science)

From Google’s English: 

“Because openness is not a utopia, nor a bunch of experts, but an essential quality of science that bears fruit on a daily basis, we wanted to show through these stories how open science benefits by its values and its operating model for knowledge and society.

We offer context articles to understand the challenges of opening up and sharing science, what obstacles it raises in accessing knowledge, what conception of research it carries. (…) ”

Impacts of the temporary National Emergency Library and controlled digital lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“Our team of librarians launched the NEL on March 24 to help those who were disconnected from their physical libraries, and the feedback our team received has been overwhelming. Almost immediately after launch, we started receiving messages from teachers, librarians, and parents who were delighted to find needed books after many schools and libraries closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, we heard from researchers and educators who found texts for their coursework and research. Feedback continues to this day, indicating that the NEL has provided a necessary service for digital learners.

As we close the NEL, we are proud of our work and how it has helped. We gathered some of the most impactful statements to show how the NEL has been used and the impact it has made while our schools and libraries are closed. We are excited that the needs of our patrons will continue to be met through traditional controlled digital lending….”

Impacts of the temporary National Emergency Library and controlled digital lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“Our team of librarians launched the NEL on March 24 to help those who were disconnected from their physical libraries, and the feedback our team received has been overwhelming. Almost immediately after launch, we started receiving messages from teachers, librarians, and parents who were delighted to find needed books after many schools and libraries closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, we heard from researchers and educators who found texts for their coursework and research. Feedback continues to this day, indicating that the NEL has provided a necessary service for digital learners.

As we close the NEL, we are proud of our work and how it has helped. We gathered some of the most impactful statements to show how the NEL has been used and the impact it has made while our schools and libraries are closed. We are excited that the needs of our patrons will continue to be met through traditional controlled digital lending….”

Welcome! · The Coronarchive · coronarchiv

“The coronarchiv is a freely accessible, open online portal that welcomes anyone’s contribution. Its purpose is to collect, archive, contextualize and exhibit personal memories and memorabilia from the time of the coronavirus pandemic. The archive can include anything that is available in a digital or digitizable format: texts (journals, letters, emails, poems, newspaper and magazine articles, shopping lists, reports, signs, warnings, regulations), photographs, drawings, illustrations, videos, chats, social media posts, voice messages, songs, lectures and anything else that is relevant.”

My Journey to Open Science

“My desire to do science has never diminished. I am still driven by the same curiosity and desire to explore—to discover new things that might improve the quality of people’s lives. That is why it means so much to me to be recognized now by my peers for my discoveries and my position on open science. The Canada Gairdner Wightman Award is an extraordinary honor that gives a special meaning to my entire career. When I was asked by Cell to contribute a story, I decided the most important one is my journey to open science. It begins back in the mid-1980s, when I was a graduate student in Genetics at Harvard University. A good friend, a post-doc named Anil, also loved stories, especially stories about well-known scientists. One was about Tom Maniatis. We’d all heard of him. He’d written what was then considered the bible of molecular biology, Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, a three-volume text we simply called ‘‘Maniatis’’ (Figure 1). According to Anil, Maniatis would freely share any information or reagents with anyone who wanted them. When asked if he was worried about being scooped, Maniatis would shrug and say, ‘‘I’m okay if someone scoops me, because it means science is moving forward faster.’’ This anecdote—and Maniatis’s attitude toward sharing—has guided me in my career as a scientist. At the time, the Open Science movement did not yet exist, but Maniatis’s philosophy lies at its heart. As I see it, open science is the early sharing of information and reagents with no restrictions….”

Q&A With Cynthia Willett and Julie Willett: Open Access and Engaging in Global Conversations | Authors Alliance

“As a part of our series of open access success stories that spotlight noteworthy openly accessible books and their authors, we’re featuring Cynthia Willett, Professor of Philosophy at Emory University and Julie Willett, Associate Professor at Texas Tech University….

Authors Alliance: Can you tell us why you opted to make Uproarious openly available?

 

Cynthia Willett & Julie Willett: Our reconceptualization of humor draws from feminist stand-ups and other post-9/11-era comics. Just as our claims are driven by popular culture, we think open access too helps us engage in global conversations. In an era with the fortunes of academics and educational institutions caught up in growing social inequality, we also hope that open access allows our research to be more accessible not only to students at elite institutions but also to those who lack resources yet often drive the conversations on trending fields like humor….

CW & JW: Perhaps the most unexpected result has been the contacts and conversations we are having with stand-up comedians who help us think about the new directions for this field of study. We have also enjoyed wider interest for our work from the media, including an interview on Free Speech TV….”