Study Shows Ensuring Reproducibility in Research Is Needed – IEEE Spectrum

“About 60 percent of IEEE conferences, magazines, and journals have no practices in place to ensure reproducibility of the research they publish. That’s according to a study by an ad hoc committee formed by the IEEE Computer Society to investigate the matter and suggest remedies.

Reproducibility—the ability to repeat a line of research and obtain consistent results—can help confirm the validity of scientific discoveries, IEEE Fellow Manish Parashar points out. He is chair of the society’s Committee on Open Science and Reproducibility….

The goal of the ad hoc committee’s study was to ensure that research results IEEE publishes are reproducible and that readers can look at the results and “be confident that they understand the processes used to create those results and they can reproduce them in their labs,” Parashar says….

Here are three key recommendations from the report:

Researchers should include specific, detailed information about the products they used in their experiment. When naming the software program, for example, authors should include the version and all necessary computer codes that were written. In addition, journals should make submitting the information easier by adding a step in the submission process. The survey found that 22 percent of the society’s journals, magazines, and conferences already have infrastructure in place for submitting such information.
All researchers should include a clear, specific, and complete description of how the reported results were reached. That includes input data, computational steps, and the conditions under which experiments and analysis were performed.
Journals and magazines, as well as scientific societies requesting submissions for their conferences, should develop and disclose policies about achieving reproducibility. Guidelines should include such information as how the papers will be evaluated for reproducibility and criteria code and data must meet….”

IEEE – IEEE and Edge Announce Partnership to Enhance Research Data Management and Collaboration with IEEE DataPort

“Edge, a nonprofit research and education network and technology partner, has announced a partnership with IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity. The two organizations will collaborate to offer increased awareness of institutional subscriptions to IEEE DataPort — a web-based, cloud services platform supporting the data-related needs of the global technical community — making it available to academic, government, and not-for-profit institutions across the United States.

IEEE DataPort provides a unified data and collaboration platform which researchers can leverage to efficiently store, share, access, and manage research data, accelerating institutional research efforts. Researchers at subscribing institutions will gain access to the more than 2,500 research datasets available on the platform and the ability to collaborate with more than 1.25 million IEEE DataPort users worldwide. The platform also enables institutions to meet funding agency requirements for the use of and sharing of data….”

IEEE Reaches a Transformative Open Access Read and Publish Agreement with Finnish Consortium FinELib

IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, and FinELib, a consortium of Finnish universities, universities of applied sciences, research institutes, and public libraries, have entered an Open Access Read and Publish agreement. For more information, see https://finelib.fi/iel-agreement. 

Free Access to Thousands of COVID-19 Research Documents – IEEE Spectrum

Experts say the COVID-19 virus is likely to be around for some time, even with vaccines, as it continues to spread and mutate. There are still many unknowns, so it’s important to keep researching the coronavirus. That’s why IEEE is making thousands of COVID-related research documents that have been published in its journals available for free.

IEEE and IReL Expand Access To Irish Technology Research with New Transformative Open Access Agreement

“IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, announced today that it has reached an open access read and publish agreement with IReL, the Irish licensing consortium.

The transformative read and publish agreement enables corresponding IReL authors to publish open access articles in IEEE’s industry-leading journals and provides reading access to over five million documents from the IEEE Xplore Digital Library. The agreement also makes it more convenient for authors to publish open access articles with IEEE as eligible authors pay no article processing charges (APCs): these costs are covered by IReL under the agreement….”

Call for papers: IEEE Software Special Issue on Collaborative Aspects of Open Data in Software Engineering – Policy and Research – Open Knowledge Forums

“Happy to announce the call for papers to the IEEE Software Special Issue on Collaborative Aspects of Open Data in Software Engineering.

With this issue, we want to focus on the collaborative aspects of Open Data in software engineering and how these aspects can help – or hinder – practitioners within both private and public organizations to exploit the potential benefits.

Extant research promotes the creation of data ecosystems or collaboratives but is limited in terms of guidelines and support for software engineers. Inspiration can be elicited from the more thoroughly investigated collaborative practices present in Open Source Software communities and Software Ecosystems….”

Next Generation ArXiv and the Economics of Open Access Publishing

“Launched in 1991, arXiv has become an indispensable platform providing free and open access to research for the machine learning community and beyond. Now, arXiv has announced plans to alpha test its next-generation “arXiv-NG” submission system in the first quarter of 2020. The system is a significant part of the growing arXiv-NG initiative that aims to improve core service infrastructure through an incremental and modular renewal of the existing arXiv system.

The arXiv team has already taken the initial steps to improve the overall accessibility of the repository’s user interfaces, both through behind-the-scenes structural improvements and user-facing changes — adding for example support for mobile-friendly abstract pages….”

What is the Price to Pay for Sci-Hub’s “Free” Articles

Costs can include those associated with building and maintaining a Web-based system that lets authors submit their papers at any time, Zappulla notes. There are also content management systems that keep track of articles as they’re submitted, peer-reviewed, and revised to provide critical feedback to authors and further the scholarly publishing process. Copy editing, text formatting, and graphics processing take place before a manuscript is finally published and uploaded to a digital library.

“Whether they are on the Web or in print, authors still want their articles to be easily discovered and read and to look good,” Zappulla says. “None of that is without cost.”

And for IEEE there’s the cost of keeping its platform, the IEEE Xplore Digital Library, running at the state of the art.

Added to those investments is the cost of archiving the material to “ensure the content will be available for posterity, no matter what happens,” Guida says. “The costs of continuing to create and develop the outstanding scholarly journals that IEEE and other STM publishers have introduced over the years must be covered.” Revenue from traditional subscriptions pays for those services, Zappulla says….”

CCC’s Declaration of Independence

“Recently, the participants of the Conference on Computational Complexity (CCC)—the latest iteration of which I’ll be speaking at next week in Vancouver—voted to declare their independence from the IEEE, and to become a solo, researcher-organized conference.  See this open letter for the reasons why (basically, IEEE charged a huge overhead, didn’t allow open access to the proceedings, and increased rather than decreased the administrative burden on the organizers).  As a former member of the CCC Steering Committee, I’m in violent agreement with this move, and only wish we’d managed to do it sooner….”