Guest Post – Open Access in Japan: Tapping the Stone Bridge – The Scholarly Kitchen

“April Fool’s Day is not really a thing in Japan, so whereas many companies in the West tend to avoid the first of the month when making important announcements, it is in no way unusual that the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), the nation’s second-largest public-sector research funder chose April 1st, 2022 to unveil its revised open access policy and implementation guidelines with a typical lack of fanfare outside of its home country….

Such a comparatively low-key approach is in line with past precedent as Japanese funding bodies such as JST, have typically opted for a light-touch and iterative approach to open access policies – which for the most part have been developed in consultation with publishers – in contrast to counterparts in other countries that have put forward more radical and headline-generating open access initiatives such as the US OSTP “Holdren Memo”, Plan S, and UKRI’s open access policy announced in mid-2021. Previous versions of the JST open access policy issued in 2013 and 2017 went little remarked upon in many open science circles and were notable for their conciliatory approach, in contrast to the openly-stated ambition to disrupt and reform the world of scholarly publishing of many other funders. Following this consultative tradition, the current policy was circulated in draft form to publisher members of CHORUS, of which JST is a participating funder, for comment prior to publication….

The most noticeable difference between the new policy and previous iterations is the introduction of an embargo period which stipulates that at minimum the Accepted Manuscript (AM) of any paper arising from a project submitted for funding to JST after the go-live date of April 1, 2022, must be made publicly accessible in an institutional or public repository in Japan within 12 months of publication of the resultant journal article. Whilst cautious by European standards, this is the first time that an embargo of any type has been included in the JST policy. In addition to AMs of research articles, the policy covers those of review articles and conference papers. While the revised policy signals a preference for the green route and does not mandate that the VoR be made available open access, publication as an open access article is a “permitted” route and under the new policy, APCs are fully reimbursable from grant money….

Furthermore, it is notable that both the policy and its implementation guidelines are silent on the twin subjects of transformative journals and transformative agreements. …

Advocates of faster and more radical transformation will probably lament the lack of clarity or silence on certain issues – such as a ban on publishing in hybrid journals and gaps around CC BY licensing for the AM – that have become totemic in many open access circles and offer a more lukewarm response. Those in the latter group may find some consolation in the knowledge that in Japan, caution does not necessarily indicate disapproval and is often regarded as a virtue, encapsulated in the phrase: ???????? (Ishibashi wo tataite wataru) “to tap on a stone bridge before crossing.” Cautious progress may initially be slower than those who rush headlong, but caution helps avoids missteps. And you’re still going across the bridge.”

 

Emerald supplies accepted manuscripts to Publications Router – Research

“Emerald, the global publisher of social science research, is now supplying accepted manuscripts of journal articles to Jisc’s Publications Router service for onward distribution to UK institutional repositories….”

Public Access Language in the U.S. Innovation & Competition Act (USICA) – SPARC

“The House and Senate are currently considering a key legislative package aimed at bolstering America’s science and technology investments. The Senate bill, called the U.S. Innovation & Competition Act (USICA), includes language that supports providing public access to taxpayer-funded research results. 

Section 2527 of USICA would codify the current policy established by President Obama’s 2013 White House Memorandum on Increasing Public Access to Federally Funded Scientific Research by “directing federal agencies funding more than $100 million annually in research and development expenditures to provide for free online public access to federally-funded research no later than 12 months after publication in peer-reviewed journals, preferably sooner.” 

This language signals Congress’ continued support for making taxpayer-funded research readily available and fully usable by scientists and the public alike. SPARC supports maintaining this provision, even as we continue to advocate for a zero-embargo national open access policy. 

Current Status: On March 28th, the Senate cleared a procedural hurdle to begin the conference process with the House. The House is expected to officially call for a House-Senate Conference Committee to work out differences between the two bills in the coming days….”

The findings from publicly-funded research should be accessible to all – UKRI

“UK Research and Innovation’s (UKRI) new open access policy is based on one simple principle, that findings from publicly-funded research should be accessible to all. The policy was published in August 2021 and comes into effect on 1 April….

After wide-reaching and measured consultation we are setting that key requirement for journal articles, while addressing other issues including:

constraining costs (and increasing our funding to pay our way)
supporting multiple routes for both publishers and authors
aligning with other key funders such as Wellcome and the European Commission to simplify publishing for our authors.

Without preempting future decisions on research assessment, our funding body colleagues have committed to being no stricter on open access than the UKRI policy, again simplifying choices for authors.

 

This is a reset, but one that follows on naturally and very simply from Finch as we abolish embargoes and target the use of UKRI funds to avoid increased costs. In essence, it is as simple as no embargoes, no hybrid payments….”

Open research policy — Birkbeck, University of London

“3.1 All research outputs produced by researchers from the College (i.e. by researchers employed by the College and research produced by research students supervised by the College) should be deposited in our institutional repository, BIROn.

3.2 Paragraphs 3.4 to 3.8 inclusive relate specifically to the following types of research publication produced:

Short-form outputs:

Peer-reviewed journal articles accepted for publication in a journal or by an online publishing platform that publishes original work (rather than a platform which aggregates and/or republishes content). This includes peer-reviewed secondary data publications such as review articles.
Peer-reviewed conference papers accepted for publication in a journal, conference proceeding with an ISSN, or by an online publishing platform that publishes original work.

Long-form outputs:

Book chapters bearing an ISBN, including chapters in academic books arising from conferences
Academic monographs, including academic monographs which have more than one author
Edited collections, where the requirements relate to the complete collection….”

4 weeks until new UKRI open access policy – key points about the green route – Cranfield University Blogs

“Did you know?

The policy permits two routes to compliant OA (open access) publishing. Route 2 is to go green.

Green route key points:

The AAM (author accepted manuscript) must be made publicly available on CERES at the same time as the version of record (publisher branded version). No embargo is permitted.
You must include a sentence of prescribed text in your acknowledgements and any cover letter accompanying the submission. This text reads: ‘For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence (where permitted by UKRI, ‘Open Government Licence’ or ‘Creative Commons Attribution No-derivatives (CC BY-ND) licence’ may be stated instead) to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising’.
Depending on where you choose to publish, you may need to negotiate with the publisher to get permission to include the text in the AAM and publish it with no embargo. Some publishers do not impose an embargo (e.g. IEEE, AIAA, Emerald)….”

The Open Access provision in Dutch copyright contract law

“On 1 July 2015 the Dutch Copyright Contract Act entered into force1 , including the new Art. 25fa of the Dutch Copyright Act that relates to open access.2 This contribution discusses the background to the open access provision and what its introduction means….”

Policy on Open Access | Cancer Research UK

“We believe that to maximise the impact of the research we fund, published research should be available in an open and unrestricted way. This facilitates rapid sharing of knowledge and promotes innovation, ultimately ensuring that patients can access better treatments sooner.

This policy sets out Cancer Research UK’s position on open access publications and how researchers and Host Institutions that receive CRUK funding are expected to provide open and unrestricted access to published research.

In all cases, CRUK encourages its researchers to select publishing routes that ensure their research is openly available immediately on publication. These publishing routes should be sought wherever such options exist for their journal of choice that are compliant with the requirements set out below….”

Policy on Open Access | Cancer Research UK

“We believe that to maximise the impact of the research we fund, published research should be available in an open and unrestricted way. This facilitates rapid sharing of knowledge and promotes innovation, ultimately ensuring that patients can access better treatments sooner.

This policy sets out Cancer Research UK’s position on open access publications and how researchers and Host Institutions that receive CRUK funding are expected to provide open and unrestricted access to published research.

In all cases, CRUK encourages its researchers to select publishing routes that ensure their research is openly available immediately on publication. These publishing routes should be sought wherever such options exist for their journal of choice that are compliant with the requirements set out below….”

UNSW Open Access Policy

“The ownership of Intellectual Property rights, including copyright, in Research Outputs is governed by the UNSW Intellectual Property Policy, and by the general law (including statute law, and contracts). As per the UNSW Intellectual Property Policy, the University asserts legal and beneficial ownership over Research Outputs created by academic, professional, technical or administrative Staff and Affiliates. The University asserts a non-exclusive licence to Research Outputs including books and journal articles, for the University’s teaching and research purposes. Consequently, for all outputs that fall within the scope of the UNSW Intellectual Property policy, UNSW researchers must retain all necessary rights to enable them to publish and share their publications in any format at any time and may not grant an exclusive copyright license in the Research Output to any other person or organisation. For each published Research Output produced in whole or part by UNSW researchers, at least one of the Version of Record or Author Accepted Manuscript versions must be licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY licence. If a UNSW researcher is submitting a manuscript to a journal that does not yet by default allow the author to make the Version of Record immediately openly accessible with a CC-BY licence the researcher must either: 1. At the time of submitting the manuscript, inform the journal of the rights retained in the Author Accepted Manuscript (for example, by outlining this in the manuscript or cover letter): 2. Or, if this is not possible at the time of submission, amend the publishing agreement….”

Are journal archiving and embargo policies impeding the success of India’s open access policy? – Koley – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  India’s primary science funding agencies, the Department of Science & Technology, and the Department of Biotechnology (DST & DBT) together formulated an open access (OA) policy in 2014. This policy mandates immediate self-archival of research articles generated from publicly funded research across all the institutions in suitable repositories. But with inadequate infrastructure and awareness, the OA mandate did not flourish as expected. This paper aims to understand whether journal policies impede the prospect of DST-DBT OA policy and the possible routes to achieve policy compliance. The analysis presented in this paper tracks down the journal self-archiving policies of the top 50 popular journals (among Indian authors) from each of the six STEM fields—Biology, Chemistry, Clinical-Medicine, Engineering, Materials science, and Physics. The results show that most journals have an embargo of 12–24?months on self-archiving of the post-print (final author version after peer-review), which contradicts the DST-DBT OA mandate. The study also reveals that hybrid journals dominate, and article processing charges craft a new form of inequity for Indian STEM researchers. We expect that these findings will be helpful for the funding agencies to restructure their policies, and negotiate with journal publishers to resolve the contradictions.

 

Are journal archiving and embargo policies impeding the success of India’s open access policy? – Koley – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  India’s primary science funding agencies, the Department of Science & Technology, and the Department of Biotechnology (DST & DBT) together formulated an open access (OA) policy in 2014. This policy mandates immediate self-archival of research articles generated from publicly funded research across all the institutions in suitable repositories. But with inadequate infrastructure and awareness, the OA mandate did not flourish as expected. This paper aims to understand whether journal policies impede the prospect of DST-DBT OA policy and the possible routes to achieve policy compliance. The analysis presented in this paper tracks down the journal self-archiving policies of the top 50 popular journals (among Indian authors) from each of the six STEM fields—Biology, Chemistry, Clinical-Medicine, Engineering, Materials science, and Physics. The results show that most journals have an embargo of 12–24?months on self-archiving of the post-print (final author version after peer-review), which contradicts the DST-DBT OA mandate. The study also reveals that hybrid journals dominate, and article processing charges craft a new form of inequity for Indian STEM researchers. We expect that these findings will be helpful for the funding agencies to restructure their policies, and negotiate with journal publishers to resolve the contradictions.

 

 

 

EUR’s next step in transitioning to 100% open access | Erasmus University Rotterdam

“This November, Erasmus University has taken a next step in transitioning to 100% Open Access with the implementation of the Open Access Regulation (OAR). The regulation is based on Article 25fa of the Copyright Act (the Taverne amendment), which gives researchers the right to make short publications freely available to the public after a reasonable period of time. The OAR makes it possible to do so through tacit agreement. This means that researchers do not need to take any action on their end.

The University Library will make the publisher’s version of short scientific publications publicly available via the institutional repository (Pure) after a six-month embargo period….”

National Open Access Policy, Malta, DRAFT, October 2021

“The policy envisages that by the end of 2025 Malta transitions to a state of immediate Open Access in terms of publications by strengthening both Gold and Green Open Access approaches, together with significant progress in upgrading existing and developing new policies, infrastructure, and synergies necessary for FAIR research data management….”