N8 Research Partnership – Statement on Rights Retention

“The N8 Research Partnership represents the research-intensive universities of the North of England. 12% of all UK academics work at N8 universities as well as almost 200,000 students. The N8 is one of the strongest regional academic consortia in the UK and believes the time is now right to make a coordinated statement on the rights held by our academics over their research….

. In order to achieve this third route to open access researchers need to be able to apply a CC BY licence and place their accepted manuscript in an institutional or other preferred repository. This must now be done without embargo granted to any publisher….”

How the James Webb Space Telescope broke the universe | MIT Technology Review

“Every day, JWST can collect more than 50 gigabytes of data, compared with just one or two gigabytes for Hubble. The data, which contains images and spectroscopic signatures (essentially light broken apart into its elements), is fed through an algorithm run by STScI. Known as a “pipeline,” it turns the telescope’s raw images and numbers into useful information. Some of this is released immediately on public servers, where it is picked up by eager scientists or even by Twitter bots such as the JWST Photo Bot. Other data is handed to scientists on programs that have proprietary windows, enabling them to take time analyzing their own data before it is released to the masses….”

Fifth U.S. Open Government National Action Plan | open.USA.gov

“Broaden Public Access to Federally-Funded Research Findings and Data.

Many important scientific and technological discoveries, including those that have helped mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic, have been supported by American tax dollars. Yet frequently, the results of such Federally-funded research are out of reach for many Americans, available only for a cost or with unnecessary delays. These barriers to accessing Federally-supported research deepen inequalities, as funding disadvantages faced by under-resourced institutions like minority-serving colleges and universities prevent communities from accessing the results of research that taxpayers have funded. To tackle these obstacles and unlock new possibilities for further innovation and participation in science, the Federal Government previously delivered guidance to agencies to develop plans for greater public access to taxpayer-funded research.

Looking forward, the Biden-Harris Administration is taking new steps to expand and accelerate access to publicly-funded research results by ensuring that publications and associated data resulting from Federally funded research are freely and publicly available without delay after publication. Making data underpinning research publications more readily available improves transparency into Federally-supported work, enabling others to replicate and build on research findings. Going forward, the Government commits to supporting access to Federally-funded science and data through several mechanisms, including through the National Science and Technology Council’s Subcommittee on Open Science; by permitting researchers to include publication and data sharing costs in their research budget proposals to Federal grant programs; by launching programs aimed at awarding more grants to early-stage researchers as well as encouraging a diverse pool of award applicants; and by exploring new incentive structures to recognize institutions and researchers who are supporting public access to data and research.”

Policy Assistant

“The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) was established to advise the President and others in the Executive Office of the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. OSTP leads interagency efforts to develop and implement sound science and technology policies and budgets….

As a Policy Assistant, GS, 0301, 9/11 your responsibilities will include:

 

Supporting CTO Leadership Team in daily tasks, including calendar management and travel coordination
Arranging meetings with stakeholders and preparing meeting materials
Managing frequent and routine correspondence
Assisting CTO team members with tracking priorities, tasks, and requests
Performing technical policy research
Drafting policy memoranda on science and technology policy topics
Other tasks as assigned…”

Community Forum on the 2022 OSTP Public Access Policy Guidance (November 7, 2022) – YouTube

“On Monday, November 7th, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) held a virtual community forum about the 2022 Public Access Memorandum titled, Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research (https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content…. The OSTP briefing was led by Dr. Alondra Nelson, Deputy Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy Director for Science and Society, and Dr. Christopher Steven Marcum, Assistant Director for Open Science and Data Policy. Federal government perspectives were provided by representatives from three federal agencies and included members of the National Science and Technology Council’s Subcommittee on Open Science. Discussion points from the OSTP briefing included Biden-Harris Administration priorities involving public access, principles motivating the 2022 OSTP Memorandum, details on the provisions of the Memorandum, and a review of the timeline for federal agency implementation expectations.”

Freier Zugang umgehend und uneingeschränkt – das ändert ab dem 1. Januar 2023

From Google’s English:  “The SNSF will adjust its Open Access requirements at the beginning of 2023. Scientific articles must now be accessible immediately. This corresponds to the principles of cOAlition S, which the SNSF joined in June 2022….

If scientific results are only publicly accessible after a blocking period, this not only harms science, but also society, which has often paid for this research. “From the point of view of the SNSF, the time for such delays in articles is now over,” says Matthias Egger, President of the National Research Council. “We no longer accept blocking periods.” If the SNSF funds a research project, the resulting articles must be freely available immediately.

As before, this obligation can be fulfilled in three different ways: publication in an open access journal (golden way), in a hybrid journal or as a manuscript version (“Author’s Accepted Manuscript”) in a digital archive (green way). The regulations for books and book chapters remain unchanged.

Use without any restrictions

Other requirements will also be new for 2023. The SNSF stipulates a CC-BY license for all articles. Scientific articles are primarily distributed and read digitally. Both the researchers and the SNSF have an interest in knowledge being spread as widely as possible and used in as many different ways as possible. The so-called Creative Commons licenses (CC licenses) are the standard today for the use of digital content and content distributed via the Internet. This means: The articles can basically be used without restrictions – from further distribution to automated evaluation in order to gain completely new insights. Of course, the researchers must be named as the authors each time they are used, and it must be clear whether the content has been changed.

rights reserved

Many publishers restrict what researchers can do with the articles they have created themselves through exclusive publication contracts. Very often these limitations also prevent the fulfillment of OA obligations. The SNSF is therefore adopting the rights retention strategy developed by cOAlition S: researchers reserve the right to make their manuscript freely available immediately and under a CC-BY license when they submit it. They refer to their obligations towards the SNSF….”

Supporting the OSTP memorandum “Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research”

“The undersigned Open Access scholarly publishers express our full support for Dr. Alondra Nelson’s United States Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum “Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research” …

Our main message is simple: publishing in any journal published by this group already meets or exceeds the requirements outlined in the OSTP memo….”

The signatory publishers are Copernicus Publications, eLife, Frontiers, JMIR Publications, MDPI, Open Library of Humanities, PeerJ, PLOS, and Ubiquity Press.

Virginia’s public academic research libraries welcome White House guidance to make taxpayer-funded research freely available without delay | VTx | Virginia Tech

“Virginia’s public academic research libraries at the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Virginia Commonwealth University, William & Mary, George Mason University, James Madison University, and Old Dominion University welcome guidance recently released by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) that will make taxpayer-funded research immediately available at no cost to the public. The Aug. 25, 2022, OSTP memo Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research requires all federal agencies to create policies to facilitate public access and eliminate any waiting period for access to articles and data resulting from federally-funded research….”

Nature’s 10: Ten people who helped shape science in 2022: ALONDRA NELSON: Policy principal

“Building on 2013 White House guidance that required scientists funded by about 20 government agencies to make their research findings freely available within one year of formal publication, the new policy eliminates the one-year grace period and applies to all government agencies. Although the OSTP had been working on the policy for years, the announcement took some by surprise. Advocates of open access lauded the action, saying it could inject momentum into a growing global movement. But the reaction was different among science publishers, who are facing the transformation of their industry….”

Public Access to Scientific Research Findings and Principles of Biomedical Research—A New Policy for the JAMA Network | Medical Journals and Publishing | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network

“Beginning in 2023, JAMA and all of the journals in the JAMA Network will adopt a new policy that permits authors of original research investigations to deposit their accepted manuscript in a public repository of their choosing immediately on the day that the manuscript is published by the JAMA Network….

With these and future policies, JAMA and the JAMA Network look forward to working collaboratively with scientists, research institutions, policy makers, funders, and other journals to lean in on first principles that support a thriving, robust scientific enterprise. Stakeholders have a shared responsibility to craft solutions that balance equity, accessibility, and sustainability. Together, we will continue to collegially debate and advance the steps to safeguard and evolve the growth and health of our ecosystem, which manifestly includes timely public access to biomedical research.”

NASA Releases Updated Scientific Information Policy for Science Mission Directorate

“On December 8, NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) released an important update to its comprehensive Scientific Information Policy (SPD-41a), which represents a significant percentage of NASA’s research expenditures. While this policy does not serve as NASA’s official response to the OSTP Nelson Memorandum, it is a good indication of what we are likely to ultimately see in NASA’s agency-wide public access plan, which is due out in February 2023….

Requires that peer-reviewed publications be made openly available with no embargo period via deposit in an agency-approved repository….

Requires that research data be shared at the time of publication or the end of the funding award….

Requires mission software to be developed and shared openly….

Requires that the proceedings of SMD-sponsored meetings and workshops be held openly to enable broad participation….”

NASA Releases Updated Scientific Information Policy for Science Mission Directorate

“On December 8, NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) released an important update to its comprehensive Scientific Information Policy (SPD-41a), which represents a significant percentage of NASA’s research expenditures. While this policy does not serve as NASA’s official response to the OSTP Nelson Memorandum, it is a good indication of what we are likely to ultimately see in NASA’s agency-wide public access plan, which is due out in February 2023….

Requires that peer-reviewed publications be made openly available with no embargo period via deposit in an agency-approved repository….

Requires that research data be shared at the time of publication or the end of the funding award….

Requires mission software to be developed and shared openly….

Requires that the proceedings of SMD-sponsored meetings and workshops be held openly to enable broad participation….”