ARIADNE PLUS – Ariadne infrastructure

“The ARIADNEplus project is the extension of the previous ARIADNE Integrating Activity, which successfully integrated archaeological data infrastructures in Europe, indexing in its registry about 2.000.000 datasets (ARIADNE portal). ARIADNEplus will build on the ARIADNE results, extending and supporting the research community that the previous project created and further developing the relationships with key stakeholders such as the most important European archaeological associations, researchers, heritage professionals, national heritage agencies and so on. The new enlarged partnership of ARIADNEplus covers all of Europe. It now includes leaders in different archaeological domains like palaeoanthropology, bioarchaeology and environmental archaeology as well as other sectors of archaeological sciences, including all periods of human presence from the appearance of hominids to present times. Transnational Activities together with the planned training will further reinforce the presence of ARIADNEplus as a key actor.

The ARIADNEplus data infrastructure will be embedded in a cloud that will offer the availability of Virtual Research Environments where data-based archaeological research may be carried out. The project will furthermore develop a Linked Data approach to data discovery, making available to users innovative services, such as visualization, annotation, text mining and geo-temporal data management. Innovative pilots will be developed to test and demonstrate the innovation potential of the ARIADNEplus approach.

ARIADNEplus is funded by the European Commission under the H2020 Programme, contract no. H2020-INFRAIA-2018-1-823914….”

Data sharing: what do we know and where can we go?

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the what about and the why of data sharing.

The recent OSTP “Nelson memo” served as a re-focus on data as a first class research output. But maybe that’s a misrepresentation for those of us who think ‘hold on, we’ve been focused on data this whole time!?’ Well here’s a chance to learn from and with a group of experts who are thinking carefully about data sharing: what that means from different perspectives, tangible steps to take and policies to make around data, and what we can do next in our communities of practice. Attendees are more than welcome to bring their own perspectives! The webinar will be chaired by Rachael Lammey. We welcome our panelists: Sarah Lippincott will give a repository perspective with insights into where data is going post Nelson Memo and NIH Policy. Aravind Venkatesan will share the thinking, data science and workflows employed at EuropePMC to support data linking. Shelley Stall will talk about how AGU are leading the line with their data policies, and Kathleen Gregory will conclude by considering researchers’ perspectives regarding sharing and reusing data.”

figshare plus

“Figshare has been helping researchers make their data openly available for more than 10 years. We want to offer a way to get more support for sharing larger datasets in a trusted generalist repository.

Figshare+ offers data deposit as a one-time Data Publishing Charge (DPC) to share the datasets and materials supporting a specific publication or project. Added features and expert guidance are also included for sharing your data FAIR-ly….”

Generalist Repository Ecosystem Initiative (GREI) Workshop | Data Science at NIH

“You are invited to join a 2-day virtual workshop presented by the seven generalist repositories participating in the Generalist Repository Ecosystem Initiative (GREI), sponsored by the NIH Office of Data Science Strategy. The workshop will focus on GREI’s vision of developing collaborative approaches for data management and sharing through inclusion of the generalist repositories in the NIH data ecosystem, and to better enable search and discovery of NIH-funded data in the generalist repositories. The workshop will feature keynote speakers and panel discussions with leaders in open data from the research community, NIH, and data community organizations. Interactive training sessions led by GREI repositories will present use-case-specific guidance on sharing and discovering data in generalist repositories. Presenters will also gather community feedback to inform future GREI work to enhance support for NIH data sharing with common functionality, interoperability, and “coopetition” among generalist repositories.”

[2301.01189] On the long-term archiving of research data

Abstract:  Accessing research data at any time is what FAIR (Findable Accessible Interoperable Reusable) data sharing aims to achieve at scale. Yet, we argue that it is not sustainable to keep accumulating and maintaining all datasets for rapid access, considering the monetary and ecological cost of maintaining repositories. Here, we address the issue of cold data storage: when to dispose of data for offline storage, how can this be done while maintaining FAIR principles and who should be responsible for cold archiving and long-term preservation.

 

Supporting essential open infrastructure: Dryad selected for SCOSS funding | Dryad news

“With over a decade of experience providing high-quality data publishing, curation, and preservation, Dryad is modeling best practices for research data infrastructure. In recognition of its relevance to the global research community, Dryad has been endorsed by a global consortium of research organizations committed to funding open infrastructure. 

The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) selected Dryad for its fourth funding cycle, citings Dryad’s ease of use, not-for-profit status and community governance, standards-compliance, and support for multidisciplinary data. SCOSS brings together a global network of institutions united around the common goal of investing in open infrastructure to support the future of open science. The SCOSS community identified “FAIR Open Access repository services” and “open research data infrastructure and services” as two of the three top funding priorities for the 2022 cycle. Dryad’s advanced data curation and publishing services are well-aligned with these priorities….”

Home – Data Commons

“Publicly available data from open sources (census.gov, cdc.gov, data.gov, etc.) are vital resources for students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. Unfortunately, processing these datasets is often tedious and cumbersome. Organizations follow distinctive practices for codifying datasets. Combining data from different sources requires mapping common entities (city, county, etc.) and resolving different types of keys/identifiers. This process is time consuming, tedious and done over and over. Our goal with Data Commons is to address this problem.

Data Commons synthesizes a single graph from these different data sources. It links references to the same entities (such as cities, counties, organizations, etc.) across different datasets to nodes on the graph, so that users can access data about a particular entity aggregated from different sources without data cleaning or joining. We hope the data contained within Data Commons will be useful to students, researchers, and enthusiasts across different disciplines….

Data Commons can be accessed by anyone via the tools available on datacommons.org. Students, researchers and developers can use the REST, Python and Google Sheets APIs, all of which are free for educational, academic and journalistic research purposes….”

Price change: We’re updating our fee for authors | Dryad news

In recognition of current costs, we’re increasing the Dryad data publication fee to $150, effective January 2023. 

Key points 

The fee for researchers submitting directly to Dryad, and not in affiliation with an institution or journal that covers fees on their behalf, will increase from $120 to 150. 
The increase focuses on cost-recovery, not generating a margin, and is based on an analysis of Dryad costs that was completed in July 2021. (See our latest Annual Report for information on costs).
Between July 2021 and June 2022, over 1,700 individual researchers paid Dryad directly to publish their data. Another 126 were not asked to pay a fee on the basis that they submitted from a country included in our waiver policy or made a special request.
Seven publishers, 17 academic societies & research organizations, and 51 institutions work with Dryad to cover costs for individuals submitting data in affiliation with them. The change does not affect our membership agreements.
The fee was last increased in January 2016….”

Data Quality Assurance at Research Data Repositories

Abstract:  This paper presents findings from a survey on the status quo of data quality assurance practices at research data repositories.

The personalised online survey was conducted among repositories indexed in re3data in 2021. It covered the scope of the repository, types of data quality assessment, quality criteria, responsibilities, details of the review process, and data quality information and yielded 332 complete responses.

The results demonstrate that most repositories perform data quality assurance measures, and overall, research data repositories significantly contribute to data quality. Quality assurance at research data repositories is multifaceted and nonlinear, and although there are some common patterns, individual approaches to ensuring data quality are diverse. The survey showed that data quality assurance sets high expectations for repositories and requires a lot of resources. Several challenges were discovered: for example, the adequate recognition of the contribution of data reviewers and repositories, the path dependence of data review on review processes for text publications, and the lack of data quality information. The study could not confirm that the certification status of a repository is a clear indicator of whether a repository conducts in-depth quality assurance.

On International Open Access Week, IBEC is launching its virtual Open Science space – Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia

“Taking advantage of the renewal of its website, IBEC has created a new virtual space dedicated to Open Science. This space is a public demonstration of IBEC’s commitment to Open Science, in accordance with its own values ??and mission, which has been realized with various initiatives and positions that the new virtual space gathers and makes visible. 

Due to its own conviction and due to the growth of the practical requirements of Open Science in the European, Spanish and Catalan research environments, the IBEC is articulating in recent years its alignment with this movement by including its principles in its own strategic plans, the approval in September 2021 of the research data management policy, the creation of an Open Science pillar with the Strategic Initiatives and Communication departments, and the incorporation of a new Knowledge Manager profile as support staff for researchers. 

These measures have made possible to carry out an internal training plan in aspects of Open Science; the improvement in the support and promotion of the publication in open access; the revision of the own research evaluation processes following the principles established in the DORA declaration; initiate the internal improvement process of research data management and facilitate its open publication, adopting the CSUC Research Data Repository (CORA), as an institutional repository; organize the didactic materials generated in the collaboration programs with the educational world, so that they are Open Educational Resources; development of citizen science projects and days for patients, or the reformulation of the Commission for Research Integrity which explicitly adds among its attributions monitoring the deployment of the Open Science strategy at IBEC; etc. …”

FORCE11 and COPE Release Recommendations on Data Publishing Ethics for Publishers and Repositories: A Discussion with the Working Group Leadership – The Scholarly Kitchen

“FORCE11 was formed out of a community of researchers, publishers, librarians and software developers who found common cause in attempting to rethink the ecosystem of scholarly communications and get the community to leverage the benefits of electronic scholarship.  Over the years, the group has been at the forefront of initiatives such as data citation, the FAIR initiative, software citation and its use in scholarship, as well as researcher rights among others. Partnerships have also been core to FORCE11’s mission with many of these initiatives being joint efforts across the community including with the Research Data Alliance (RDA), Research Software Alliance (ReSA), UCLA, and the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).  

Last fall, the joint FORCE11 & COPE Research Data Publication Ethics Working Group published recommendations for the ethical handling of research data publication. The group has built on the recommendations and released policy templates for journals and publishers, as well as data repositories. Both are freely available via the FORCE11 website. The leaders of this group, Daniella Lowenberg and Iratxe Puebla, along with group member Matthew Cannon, shared their reflections on the project, its goals, and what the group has accomplished ….”

Anniversary of re3data: 10 Years of Active Campaigning for the Opening of Research Data and a Culture of Sharing | ZBW MediaTalk

“re3data, the largest directory for research data, is celebrating its tenth birthday. We interviewed two re3data team members about milestones achieved, their personal re3data highlights, and their vision for the service’s future….”