IReL support for open scholarship infrastructure – IReL

IReL, the Irish e-resources licensing consortium, is very pleased to announce that it is supporting the following SCOSS-endorsed initiatives:

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) 
Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) & OAPEN 
Sherpa Romeo

Much of the infrastructure needed to make open research possible must be openly available without user-facing or institution-facing charges. This presents a challenge in sustainably funding it. One way of making this work is for libraries, library consortia and other stakeholders to commit ongoing funding on a voluntary basis. 

IReL and its member libraries recognise that these infrastructures are of long standing benefit to libraries and their users and are crucial to open research globally. Therefore we agree that it is in our interests to help sustain them.

IReL is committed to supporting these initiatives for three years, from 2022 to 2024.

Ireland’s open-access geospatial data hub gets an update

“Ordnance Survey Ireland (OSI) has launched an update to its web platform, GeoHive, with improvements to its maps and databases.

GeoHive is an online hub where public sector bodies can upload geospatial data, which are datasets in which information is mapped to locations.

There are various datasets which the public can access through GeoHive, from data on Ireland’s environment and soil, to details on its population and economy. More recently, datasets on Covid-19 have been included, such as vaccination and incidence rates.

The update has enhanced GeoHive’s interactive maps for users, who can search for specific datasets and apply it to any part of the map they zoom in on….”

Observing the success so far of the Rights Retention Strategy | Plan S

“As someone who is independent of cOAlition S, I have been monitoring with great interest the application of the Rights Retention Strategy (RRS).

Using Google Scholar and Paperpile, I have documented over 500 works published across hundreds of different outlets using the Rights Retention Strategy language in the acknowledgements section of the work. Authors are using it to retain their rights in preprints, journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, and even posters – this makes perfect sense; the RRS language is simple and easy to add to research outputs. It’s not a burden to acknowledge one’s research funding and to add the statement: “For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a CC BY public copyright licence to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising from this submission“, and so authors are doing this….

I am also pleased to observe that ALL the major publishers appear to be happily publishing works containing the RRS language, including Elsevier, ACS, Taylor & Francis, Wiley, IEEE, and Springer Nature (inc. Nature Publication Group). So, authors need not fear practising rights retention.

I note that the RRS is a tool that can be and is used across all disciplines – it works equally well for STEM and HSS. Indeed one of my favourite examples of RRS-in-action is a Wellcome Trust funded output by Dr Barbara Zipser from the Department of History at Royal Holloway, University of London. Thanks to the RRS language Dr Zipser included in her submission, there is a full-text accepted author manuscript version of her work available at EuropePMC for all to read, whilst separately the journal-published version is available from the publisher website behind a 25 euro paywall. The author accepted manuscript has undergone peer review and has been accepted by the publisher (it is not a rough preprint, from before peer review). I do not need to read a version that has publisher branding & logos. When researchers choose the “green” route to open access, people need not feel sorry for the journal publisher – individual and institutional subscribers pay handsomely to support the journal. Thus, green open access is never “unfunded“, as some publishers have tried to claim….

As a keen Wikimedian, I am delighted with another aspect of the RRS. Prior to the RRS, green OA copies of articles weren’t much used on Wikimedia Commons owing to incompatible licensing. But now, with the RRS, suddenly, RRS-using green OA copies become easier to adapt for re-use on other websites. As Wikipedia is one of the top 15 most visited websites globally, I think it is very important that academic research is not prevented from being used there by overly restrictive licensing conditions. To celebrate this openness, I have added a few figure images sourced from cOAlition S funded, CC BY licensed, author accepted manuscripts using RRS to Wikimedia Commons. These images can be re-used within suitable Wikipedia articles across all languages, helping the transmission of research information beyond the constraints of academic journals and language barriers….”

Where Did the Web Archive Go?

Abstract:  To perform a longitudinal investigation of web archives and detecting variations and changes replaying individual archived pages, or mementos, we created a sample of 16,627 mementos from 17 public web archives. Over the course of our 14-month study (November, 2017 – January, 2019), we found that four web archives changed their base URIs and did not leave a machine-readable method of locating their new base URIs, necessitating manual rediscovery. Of the 1,981 mementos in our sample from these four web archives, 537 were impacted: 517 mementos were rediscovered but with changes in their time of archiving (or Memento-Datetime), HTTP status code, or the string comprising their original URI (or URI-R), and 20 of the mementos could not be found at all.

 

Open Access and the Humanities: A dialogue on future directions for Ireland, 25 August 2021 | National Open Research Forum

“As research systems transition to Open Access models of dissemination, there is a need to foster a dialogue on impacts and support for disciplinary research communities. Together, Ireland’s National Open Research Forum (NORF) and the Irish Humanities Alliance (IHA) will host a workshop for researchers in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences to discuss future directions for Ireland’s transition to Open Access….”

“Open Education Policies in Irish Higher Education and the Role of Librarians: Review and Recommendations” by Aisling Coyne

Coyne, Aisling, “Open Education Policies in Irish Higher Education and the Role of Librarians: Review and Recommendations” (2020). DOI: 10.21427/d77j-yw77

Abstract: This research aims to highlight the role librarians can play in OER policy, development, design, collaboration, publishing, teaching and management. This research will interview key experts, advocates, and librarians working in this area. Semi-structured interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. The main results of the study for policy are that institutional culture and institutional buy-in are of paramount importance, pervading policy discussions, policy involvement, rewards and incentives, OER use and management. Recommendations from the study are that a national OER policy be created with a timeline for compliance to allow autonomy of the institution and consider institutional culture, librarians should be supported to up-skill, we should follow a Team Science model for reward and incentive, and that a national university press is a worthwhile idea in an Irish context.

IEEE and IReL Expand Access To Irish Technology Research with New Transformative Open Access Agreement

“IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, announced today that it has reached an open access read and publish agreement with IReL, the Irish licensing consortium.

The transformative read and publish agreement enables corresponding IReL authors to publish open access articles in IEEE’s industry-leading journals and provides reading access to over five million documents from the IEEE Xplore Digital Library. The agreement also makes it more convenient for authors to publish open access articles with IEEE as eligible authors pay no article processing charges (APCs): these costs are covered by IReL under the agreement….”

Open Access: A citizen’s guide to discovering who holds your info – and what’s in there

“When people think of getting information from public bodies, they often think of Freedom of Information (FOI). But when it comes to accessing records which contain your personal information, there are now more avenues than FOI.

Of course, it’s still a useful route – while many think of the FOI request as the preserve of journalists for stories about politicians’ expenses or the behind the scenes of some dubious government decision, in fact of the nearly 40,000 FOI requests last year, nearly 60% were for personal information….”

 

Project breathing new life into forgotten medieval chants – Medievalists.net

“The Amra project, led by music historian Dr Ann Buckley at Trinity’s Medieval History Research Centre, is aiming to digitise and make freely available online over 300 manuscripts containing liturgical material associated with some 40 Irish saints which are located in research libraries across Europe….”

National Open Research Coordinator – 18-month FTC | Royal Irish Academy

“Ireland’s “National Framework on the Transition to an Open Research Environment”, prepared by the National Open Research Forum (NORF) was published in July 2019 and represents the ambition of the research community to engage with and deliver the Open Research agenda in Ireland. The Framework is a first step in the process of preparing a National Action Plan. 

The National Open Research Coordinator will play a key role in the national higher education landscape in driving the next phase of implementation of Ireland’s Open Research policy agenda. The successful candidate will be tasked with critically assessing Ireland’s preparedness to support the various components of the European Open Science/Open Research landscape, and preparing a roadmap on the development and delivery of a National Action Plan for the implementation of open research across Ireland.

This post is based at the Digital Repository of Ireland, within the Royal Irish Academy. This post will report to the NORF Co-Chairs in the first instance, via the Director of DRI and onward to the Open Research Core Oversight Group made up of representatives from the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation, the Higher Education Authority, and the Health Research Board….”

National Open Research Coordinator – 18-month FTC | Royal Irish Academy

“Ireland’s “National Framework on the Transition to an Open Research Environment”, prepared by the National Open Research Forum (NORF) was published in July 2019 and represents the ambition of the research community to engage with and deliver the Open Research agenda in Ireland. The Framework is a first step in the process of preparing a National Action Plan. 

The National Open Research Coordinator will play a key role in the national higher education landscape in driving the next phase of implementation of Ireland’s Open Research policy agenda. The successful candidate will be tasked with critically assessing Ireland’s preparedness to support the various components of the European Open Science/Open Research landscape, and preparing a roadmap on the development and delivery of a National Action Plan for the implementation of open research across Ireland.

This post is based at the Digital Repository of Ireland, within the Royal Irish Academy. This post will report to the NORF Co-Chairs in the first instance, via the Director of DRI and onward to the Open Research Core Oversight Group made up of representatives from the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation, the Higher Education Authority, and the Health Research Board….”

SOAPBOX – Open Scholarship – Library Guides at Trinity College Dublin

“This project seeks to engage the student community in activities that will maximise the reach of their work and embrace contemporary developments in scholarly communication via the facilitation of a Student Open Access Project, or SOAPBOX for short.  Students participating in this project will receive recognition for their participation on this programme materialising in the award of a ‘Certificate in Scholarly Communication’ from the Office of the Dean of Research.  …”

 

The availability of open access videos offered by dental schools – Dias da Silva – – European Journal of Dental Education – Wiley Online Library

Abstract. Aim

 

Evaluate the video content offered by UK and Republic of Ireland (RoI) Dental Schools on their YouTube channels and public websites.

Methods

Free videos offered on UK and RoI Dental schools websites and YouTube channels, were watched and set according to its purpose, as educational or non?educational. The number of views, length, category and date of publication were analysed.

Results

A total of 627 videos offered by dental courses were evaluated. Videos were available on 83% of the websites, but only 9% was educational content. Dental courses YouTube channels received more than 2.3 million views, but less than 5% of the material offered is educational. Instructional videos found on the websites (3.2 min) were shorter than those found on YouTube (8.5 min) (p=0.03). The majority of the videos, provided by Universities, were not educational and focused on promoting the dental courses. Most websites have demonstrated a password protected area where quality content may be offered.

Conclusion

Students wishing to watch instructional videos will find limited educational content provided by UK and RoI dental courses. Therefore they are likely to access course related material elsewhere on the Internet that may not be necessarily peer?reviewed.

Science Foundation Ireland’s 2018 Annual Report highlights 43% increase in research funding from industry to €46 million – Irish Tech News

“At the end of 2018, 45% of SFI-funded original and review articles were open access, bringing us closer to our goal of achieving full and immediate open access for all SFI-funded research publications by 2021. This increased access allows the societal and economic benefits of our funded research to go further. As we build on this continued growth and look to 2019 and beyond, Science Foundation Ireland’s new strategy for 2020-2025will aim to empower our research community, focusing on the areas where we can bring the most value.”