NUI Galway IP Policy and OER: Comparing NUI Galway and Peer Institutions in Ireland | The HardiBlog: Blog for the NUI Galway Library

by Kris Meen

I blogged recently about Open Educational Resource policies and whether NUI Galway ought to think about reviewing its own policies with an eye towards making them more OER-enabling. More recently, it occurred to me that it might be useful to have a look at some peer institutions in Ireland. and their IP policies to see if I could get an impression of how NUI Galway’s policies stack up to others’ in terms of their OER-friendliness. I went ahead and found the IP policies of five peer universities: Maynooth University, Trinity College Dublin, University College Cork, University College Dublin, and the University of Limerick. What I found was interesting: that the IP policy at NUI Galway appears to be a bit of an outlier, and in some ways would probably be considered less OER-friendly than at least some of our peers. I include links to all six IP policies (NUI Galway and five peer institutions) below as Appendix A.

 

CFP: Wikimedia+Libraries International Convention 2022 | Maynooth, Ireland, 23-24 July, 2022

“With support from the Wikimedia Foundation, we are excited to announce the first-ever Wikimedia+Libraries International Convention, to be held in Maynooth, Ireland, 23-24 July, 2022. While a limited number of scholarships are available, individuals do not need to be awarded a scholarship to participate. As the inaugural conference for professionals working at the intersection of Wikimedia and libraries, we seek proposals that engage all aspects of libraries and information literacy work happening in and alongside the Wikimedia movement. Wikimedia’s core-knowledge projects (especially Wikipedia, Wikidata, Wikisource, and Wikimedia Commons) provide the community, resources, and technical infrastructure that enable free educational content on a global scale. To reach their full potential, however, these projects need participation from library leaders and their communities. To that end, we seek proposals that demonstrate practical, scholarly, and/or speculative engagement with Wikimedia across a diverse range of topics, including but not limited to:

Advocacy and outreach in local contexts
Tutorials and training on Wikimedia’s core-knowledge projects (Wikipedia, Wikidata, Wikisource, Wikimedia Commons)
Experience sharing panels
Productive failures
Future research – What are the initiatives/research that will move us forward?
Publication and research at the intersection of Wikimedia+Libraries

Important Dates

27 May – 21 June, 2022: Share the call for proposals with your networks!
21 June, 2022: Deadline for proposal submission
22 June – 2 July, 2022: Programme committee reviews proposals
5 July, 2022: Decisions on proposals and publication of programme draft
23 July – 24 July, 2022: Conference event…”

gov.ie – Minister Harris welcomes €1.7 million funding for Ireland’s open research transition

“Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris, has today announced funding of €1.725 million to support the uptake and implementation of open research practices in Irish higher education institutions and the wider Irish research system. This funding is through the Higher Education Authority (HEA)….

Ireland’s plans for open science are well aligned with the recommendations of organisations including the European Commission and UNESCO, which note the potential of open science to reduce inequalities and increase scientific cooperation through rapid and transparent knowledge-sharing.

Open science brings knowledge created in Ireland to the world stage and demonstrates the quality of our higher education, research, and innovation to a wider audience.”

gov.ie – Minister Harris welcomes €1.7 million funding for Ireland’s open research transition

“Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris, has today announced funding of €1.725 million to support the uptake and implementation of open research practices in Irish higher education institutions and the wider Irish research system. This funding is through the Higher Education Authority (HEA)….

Ireland’s plans for open science are well aligned with the recommendations of organisations including the European Commission and UNESCO, which note the potential of open science to reduce inequalities and increase scientific cooperation through rapid and transparent knowledge-sharing.

Open science brings knowledge created in Ireland to the world stage and demonstrates the quality of our higher education, research, and innovation to a wider audience.”

NUI Galway Open Scholarship Week 2022, April 11-12, 2022

Save the date:

Open Scholarship Week 2022 will take place April 11th – 12th, 2022 and feature a mixture of online and in-person presentations and workshops. 

For a taste of what’s to come, the 2021 presentations are available to watch back. 

We look forward to welcoming you back to Galway!

PLOS and IReL Sign Three Year Open Access Publishing Agreement

PLOS, the non-profit open access publisher, and IReL, the Irish library consortium, today announced a new three year open access agreement, which allows researchers at eight participating institutions to publish open access articles in PLOS journals. 

This agreement is IReL’s twentieth open access agreement and its first with a fully open access publisher.

RLUK Strategy 2022-2025

Research Libraries UK, an alliance of 37 significant research libraries in the UK and Ireland, is committed to working with, and on behalf of, its members to enable them to face shared challenges and seize collective opportunities.

This strategy outlines the ways in which RLUK harnesses the collective voice, experience, and expertise of its members, its determination to support them as they face current and emerging challenges, and its ability to act as a confident voice on behalf of the community.

This strategy is also an invitation, to like-minded stakeholders, to join with RLUK and its members as we work to transform scholarship and the role of the research library.

IReL support for open scholarship infrastructure – IReL

IReL, the Irish e-resources licensing consortium, is very pleased to announce that it is supporting the following SCOSS-endorsed initiatives:

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) 
Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) & OAPEN 
Sherpa Romeo

Much of the infrastructure needed to make open research possible must be openly available without user-facing or institution-facing charges. This presents a challenge in sustainably funding it. One way of making this work is for libraries, library consortia and other stakeholders to commit ongoing funding on a voluntary basis. 

IReL and its member libraries recognise that these infrastructures are of long standing benefit to libraries and their users and are crucial to open research globally. Therefore we agree that it is in our interests to help sustain them.

IReL is committed to supporting these initiatives for three years, from 2022 to 2024.

Ireland’s open-access geospatial data hub gets an update

“Ordnance Survey Ireland (OSI) has launched an update to its web platform, GeoHive, with improvements to its maps and databases.

GeoHive is an online hub where public sector bodies can upload geospatial data, which are datasets in which information is mapped to locations.

There are various datasets which the public can access through GeoHive, from data on Ireland’s environment and soil, to details on its population and economy. More recently, datasets on Covid-19 have been included, such as vaccination and incidence rates.

The update has enhanced GeoHive’s interactive maps for users, who can search for specific datasets and apply it to any part of the map they zoom in on….”

Observing the success so far of the Rights Retention Strategy | Plan S

“As someone who is independent of cOAlition S, I have been monitoring with great interest the application of the Rights Retention Strategy (RRS).

Using Google Scholar and Paperpile, I have documented over 500 works published across hundreds of different outlets using the Rights Retention Strategy language in the acknowledgements section of the work. Authors are using it to retain their rights in preprints, journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, and even posters – this makes perfect sense; the RRS language is simple and easy to add to research outputs. It’s not a burden to acknowledge one’s research funding and to add the statement: “For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a CC BY public copyright licence to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising from this submission“, and so authors are doing this….

I am also pleased to observe that ALL the major publishers appear to be happily publishing works containing the RRS language, including Elsevier, ACS, Taylor & Francis, Wiley, IEEE, and Springer Nature (inc. Nature Publication Group). So, authors need not fear practising rights retention.

I note that the RRS is a tool that can be and is used across all disciplines – it works equally well for STEM and HSS. Indeed one of my favourite examples of RRS-in-action is a Wellcome Trust funded output by Dr Barbara Zipser from the Department of History at Royal Holloway, University of London. Thanks to the RRS language Dr Zipser included in her submission, there is a full-text accepted author manuscript version of her work available at EuropePMC for all to read, whilst separately the journal-published version is available from the publisher website behind a 25 euro paywall. The author accepted manuscript has undergone peer review and has been accepted by the publisher (it is not a rough preprint, from before peer review). I do not need to read a version that has publisher branding & logos. When researchers choose the “green” route to open access, people need not feel sorry for the journal publisher – individual and institutional subscribers pay handsomely to support the journal. Thus, green open access is never “unfunded“, as some publishers have tried to claim….

As a keen Wikimedian, I am delighted with another aspect of the RRS. Prior to the RRS, green OA copies of articles weren’t much used on Wikimedia Commons owing to incompatible licensing. But now, with the RRS, suddenly, RRS-using green OA copies become easier to adapt for re-use on other websites. As Wikipedia is one of the top 15 most visited websites globally, I think it is very important that academic research is not prevented from being used there by overly restrictive licensing conditions. To celebrate this openness, I have added a few figure images sourced from cOAlition S funded, CC BY licensed, author accepted manuscripts using RRS to Wikimedia Commons. These images can be re-used within suitable Wikipedia articles across all languages, helping the transmission of research information beyond the constraints of academic journals and language barriers….”

Where Did the Web Archive Go?

Abstract:  To perform a longitudinal investigation of web archives and detecting variations and changes replaying individual archived pages, or mementos, we created a sample of 16,627 mementos from 17 public web archives. Over the course of our 14-month study (November, 2017 – January, 2019), we found that four web archives changed their base URIs and did not leave a machine-readable method of locating their new base URIs, necessitating manual rediscovery. Of the 1,981 mementos in our sample from these four web archives, 537 were impacted: 517 mementos were rediscovered but with changes in their time of archiving (or Memento-Datetime), HTTP status code, or the string comprising their original URI (or URI-R), and 20 of the mementos could not be found at all.

 

Open Access and the Humanities: A dialogue on future directions for Ireland, 25 August 2021 | National Open Research Forum

“As research systems transition to Open Access models of dissemination, there is a need to foster a dialogue on impacts and support for disciplinary research communities. Together, Ireland’s National Open Research Forum (NORF) and the Irish Humanities Alliance (IHA) will host a workshop for researchers in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences to discuss future directions for Ireland’s transition to Open Access….”

“Open Education Policies in Irish Higher Education and the Role of Librarians: Review and Recommendations” by Aisling Coyne

Coyne, Aisling, “Open Education Policies in Irish Higher Education and the Role of Librarians: Review and Recommendations” (2020). DOI: 10.21427/d77j-yw77

Abstract: This research aims to highlight the role librarians can play in OER policy, development, design, collaboration, publishing, teaching and management. This research will interview key experts, advocates, and librarians working in this area. Semi-structured interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. The main results of the study for policy are that institutional culture and institutional buy-in are of paramount importance, pervading policy discussions, policy involvement, rewards and incentives, OER use and management. Recommendations from the study are that a national OER policy be created with a timeline for compliance to allow autonomy of the institution and consider institutional culture, librarians should be supported to up-skill, we should follow a Team Science model for reward and incentive, and that a national university press is a worthwhile idea in an Irish context.