2023-02-01 Community Call – IRUS, ORCID, and DOIs – Google Docs

“Guest Speaker: Hannah Rosen, Strategist for Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives at Lyrasis:

What is IRUS? General overview

How does IRUS work with ORCID?

How does IRUS work with DOIs?

Is there anything else we need to know about IRUS?

Compatibility

Installation

How to participate…”

Discover DOCI, the index of open citations from DataCite – OpenCitations blog

“We’re excited to introduce DOCI, the OpenCitations Index of Datacite open DOI-to-DOI citations, a new tool containing citations derived from publications bearing DataCite DOIs to other DOI-identified publications, harvested from DataCite. The citations available in DOCI are treated as first-class data entities, with accompanying properties including the citations timespan, modelled according to the OpenCitations Data Model. 

Currently, DOCI’s December 2022 release contains 169,822,752 citations from 1,753,860  bibliographic resources, and is based on the last dump of DataCite dated 22 October 2021 provided by the Internet Archive. …”

Finding the Proof of the PID Pudding – DataCite Blog

“Earlier this year, DataCite consortium lead and partner organization, the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC), together with Australian ORCID consortium lead organization, the Australian Access Federation (AAF), commissioned the MoreBrains Cooperative to undertake a cost benefit analysis of the incentives for adoption of persistent identifiers (PIDs) by the Australian research sector. The resulting report, Incentives to invest in identifiers: A cost-benefit analysis of persistent identifiers in Australian research systems, published in September, found that 80% adoption of five priority PIDs would lead to savings of 38,000 researcher days per year. The direct financial cost of this wasted effort is close to AUD24 million per year (around 15M USD/ EUR); accounting for the opportunity cost associated with technology transfer and innovation-led growth, the savings increase to a staggering AUD84 million per year!

The PIDs in question are ORCID iDs for people, ROR IDs for institutions, ARDC’s own RAiDs for projects, Crossref and DataCite DOIs for research outputs, and Crossref DOIs for grants. In addition, as part of a longer-term strategy, the report recommends that work should continue on developing PIDs for instruments, expanding the uses of IGSN IDs for samples, and potentially other IDs, in collaboration with other research communities. Other recommendations include: …”

Long-term availability of data associated with articles in PLOS ONE | PLOS ONE

Abstract:  The adoption of journal policies requiring authors to include a Data Availability Statement has helped to increase the availability of research data associated with research articles. However, having a Data Availability Statement is not a guarantee that readers will be able to locate the data; even if provided with an identifier like a uniform resource locator (URL) or a digital object identifier (DOI), the data may become unavailable due to link rot and content drift. To explore the long-term availability of resources including data, code, and other digital research objects associated with papers, this study extracted 8,503 URLs and DOIs from a corpus of nearly 50,000 Data Availability Statements from papers published in PLOS ONE between 2014 and 2016. These URLs and DOIs were used to attempt to retrieve the data through both automated and manual means. Overall, 80% of the resources could be retrieved automatically, compared to much lower retrieval rates of 10–40% found in previous papers that relied on contacting authors to locate data. Because a URL or DOI might be valid but still not point to the resource, a subset of 350 URLs and 350 DOIs were manually tested, with 78% and 98% of resources, respectively, successfully retrieved. Having a DOI and being shared in a repository were both positively associated with availability. Although resources associated with older papers were slightly less likely to be available, this difference was not statistically significant, suggesting that URLs and DOIs may be an effective means for accessing data over time. These findings point to the value of including URLs and DOIs in Data Availability Statements to ensure access to data on a long-term basis.