Supporting knowledge creation and sharing by building a standardised interconnected repository of biodiversity data | Zenodo

“This EOSC in practice story was developed within the Cos4cloud project and targets a very wide user base as it is addressed to any researchers, teachers, students, companies, institutions and, more generally, anyone interested in knowing, studying or analysing biodiversity information.

The story presents Cos4Bio, a co-designed, interoperable and open-source service that integrates biodiversity observations from multiple citizen observatories in one place, allowing experts to save time in the species identification process and get access to an enormous number of biodiversity observations. This resource is available on the EOSC Portal Catalogue and Marketplace …”

Supporting knowledge creation and sharing by building a standardised interconnected repository of biodiversity data | EOSC Portal

“This EOSC in practice story targets a very wide user base as it is addressed to any researchers, teachers, students, companies, institutions and, more generally, anyone interested in knowing, studying or analysing biodiversity information. It was developed within the Cos4cloud project….

Cos4Bio is a co-designed, interoperable and open-source service that integrates biodiversity observations from multiple citizen observatories in one place, allowing experts to save time in the species identification process and get access to an enormous number of biodiversity observations….”

Is Infrastructure Consolidation the Next Step? CCC Acquires Ringgold – The Scholarly Kitchen

“It seems that barely a month goes by these days without another acquisition in the scholarly communications and publishing space. Most of the attention has focused on major acquisitions by Elsevier and Clarivate, particularly Elsevier’s recent acquisition of interfolio, the company behind the reporting tool researchFish, and Clarivate’s purchase of ProQuest at the end of last year. And to be sure, their movement towards scholarly workflow tools and platforms is an extremely important development. The recent news that the Copyright Clearance Center will acquire Ringgold is an important reminder that many other firms, including not-for-profits, are actively pursuing growth strategies that contain elements other than organic growth. It is also another confirmation of the extreme strategic value of infrastructure, including in particular the persistent identifiers, lovingly known as PIDs, that is needed to advance scholarly communication in an increasingly open access environment. And it raises the question of whether infrastructure will be managed openly through community governed organizations or the extent to which the sector can live with its privatization….”

What Does EPUB 3.3 Mean For Accessibility? – Inclusive Publishing

“The publishing community eagerly awaits the new version of the EPUB standard, EPUB 3.3, the related EPUB 1.1 accessibility specification and the updated version of EPUBCheck. We asked EPUB 3.3 editor and DAISY developer Matt Garrish; “What does this mean for accessible publishing?’

Can We Expect Major Changes For Accessibility?

Neither the EPUB 3.3 nor the Accessibility 1.1 revisions represent major changes. Most of our efforts are focused on taking the work we’ve already done and moving the documents through the W3C process to make formal recommended specifications of them (i.e., to be fully recognized by W3C membership). EPUB 3.2 was published by the W3C publishing community group, so those documents did not have any formal standing (they didn’t have to go through W3C membership votes, they didn’t have to show independent implementations, etc.). So, EPUB 3.3 will formalize the standard….”

Born Accessible: Creating Templates for Standardized, Accessible ETDs: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  At the University of Southern Indiana (USI), graduate programs primarily produce physical theses and capstones. As programs expand online options, the need for electronic dissertations and theses grows. The institutional repository offered a chance for the library to collaborate with graduate studies and teaching program faculty to develop templates that would streamline workflows and improve document accessibility. Templates were created for doctor of education dissertations in APA style, along with master theses in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles that could serve multiple programs. This presentation outlined the process of working with campus stakeholders to develop the templates, as well as the steps taken to ensure accessibility of both the template and final dissertation or thesis. Presentation resources and electronic theses and dissertation (ETD) templates are available for download at http://bit.ly/born_accessible.

 

English professor develops virtual Open Corpus Project | The Justice

“Prof. Dorothy Kim (ENG) is currently working to develop a virtual corpus, or collection of written texts, of Early Middle English language. This would give researchers the opportunity to search across multiple archives and databases of manuscripts. The current status of the Open Corpus Project, as the site is titled, was unveiled at a Faculty Lunch Symposium on Thursday, March 17….

There are many existing corpora for Early Middle English and other languages, but each one has a different set of pros and cons, Kim explained. …

She explained that the design for the Open Corpus Project will be mainly based on a digital platform called Open Context, which is an open access archeological database. She said that Open Context has a landing page with a map, clickable links, and search filters; searches are presented in an organized list so that documents are easy to view and further searches can be done from the results. In order to develop the Open Corpus Project in a similar manner, Kim is partnering with Geocene, an engineering consultancy….”

 

FAIRly big: A framework for computationally reproducible processing of large-scale data | bioRxiv

Abstract:  Large-scale datasets present unique opportunities to perform scientific investigations with un-precedented breadth. However, they also pose considerable challenges for the findability, accessibility, interoperability, and reusability (FAIR) of research outcomes due to infrastructure limitations, data usage constraints, or software license restrictions. Here we introduce a DataLad-based, domain-agnostic framework suitable for reproducible data processing in compliance with open science mandates. The framework attempts to minimize platform idiosyncrasies and performance-related complexities. It affords the capture of machine-actionable computational provenance records that can be used to retrace and verify the origins of research outcomes, as well as be re-executed independent of the original computing infrastructure. We demonstrate the framework’s performance using two showcases: one highlighting data sharing and transparency (using the studyforrest.org dataset) and another highlighting scalability (using the largest public brain imaging dataset available: the UK Biobank dataset).

 

Kingsley (2021) A Call to Develop Standards for Those Delivering ‘Research Practice’ Training | Pop! Journal

by Danny Kingsley

Introduction

Globally, the interrelated issues of reproducibility, open science, and quality have become increasingly prominent over the past few years (Vitae, UKRN, UK Research Integrity Office 2020; House of Commons 2018; Rathemacher 2017; Baker 2015) with an accompanying set of new requirements and skills for the research sector. This article is making the argument for a more structured approach to researcher training. There is a need to identify and articulate a clear framework or curriculum for training and professional development in areas of research practice beyond disciplinary-specific skills and knowledge. This will allow institutions to more systematically approach this growing area and also provide structure for libraries as the provider of much of the training in these areas, not only in development of content, but also in terms of the types of skills they need to recruit for or develop amongst their staff.

Open science, open scholarship, open research, and open knowledge have aligned but slightly different meanings. There are so many different definitions of “open” that there has been an attempt to define the definitions (Bosman 2017). This article will use the following definition (noting in this instance “science” is being used in the European sense of the Latin “scienta” meaning “knowledge” and incorporates all research areas):

Open Science is the practice of science in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research data, lab notes and other research processes are freely available, under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the research and its underlying data and methods. (FOSTER n.d.)

This paper will consider the interrelated question of changing researcher needs and the subsequent learning requirements for those supporting researchers.

The author’s interest in this area has stemmed from working in senior positions in scholarly communication in the UK and Australia and directly observing issues with the ability to recruit staff with scholarly communication skills. A series of exploratory workshops (Kingsley 2017) led to the formation of a multi-organizational group of training providers in the UK to address the lack of role profiles and recruitment and development of open research support staff (ORCC 2021). This combined with research into the area (Sewell 2017; Kingsley, Richardson, and Kennan 2020), and subsequent work in multiple institutions in Australia informs much of the discussion in this article, which by its development tends to focus on activity in Europe, the US, and Australasia.

This article is focused on the skills and knowledge required of research support staff, which have changed in response to recent significant changes in government and funder expectations of researchers in relation to ensuring their work is more transparent. Increasingly research outputs are expected to be openly accessible (Wellcome Trust 2020; UKRI 2019; Australian Research Council 2018; National Health and Medical Research Council 2018; National Institutes of Health 2008; Vidal 2018). Open science and open research are increasingly on the agenda of institutions across the globe (Wellcome Trust 2020; UKRI 2019; Vidal 2018; National Health and Medical Research Council 2018; Research Councils UK 2013; National Institutes of Health 2005). The “open” agenda is international. In Nov 2021 UNESCO will adopt their open science recommendations (UNESCO 2021) .

This article will first address the need for different skills and knowledge now required of researchers before moving to the issue of ensuring those that support researchers are able to meet these emerging training needs.

Contributor Roles Taxonomy (CRediT) Formalized as ANSI/NISO Standard | NISO website

“The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) today announces its publication of the Contributor Roles Taxonomy (CRediT) as an ANSI/NISO standard, Z39.104-2022. The taxonomy, which was originally developed in 2014, describes 14 roles that represent the typical range of contributors to scientific scholarly outputs, and that can be used to enable recognition and facilitate transparency to the myriad contributions to research in our increasingly networked scholarly ecosystem. CRediT is already in use by more than 50 organizations, a majority of which are scholarly publishers, collectively representing thousands of journals….”

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) for Systematic Reviewers and other Researchers: Benefits, Confusions, and Need-to-Knows | by Farhad | Jan, 2022 | Medium

“DOI enhances the accessibility, discoverability, trustability, and interoperability of digital objects and serves the openness and visibility of professionally published content. While I am not a DOI expert, I know about it because I use it a lot in my profession. I believe DOI will play a significant role in the automation of literature reviews. More than it does now.

It is the responsibility of librarians, information specialists and other information professionals to raise awareness about the benefits of DOI. …”

IRUS-UK | Jisc

“IRUS (Institutional Repository Usage Statistics) enables institutional repositories (IRs) to share and expose statistics based on the COUNTER standard. It provides an aggregated view of repository usage to benefit organisations, it offers opportunities for benchmarking, and acts as an intermediary between repositories and other agencies.

IRUS collects raw usage data from IRs and processes these data into COUNTER-conformant usage statistics. This provides repositories with comparable, authoritative, standards-based usage data.

IRUS is a community-driven development, responding to user needs….”

IRUS-UK | Jisc

“IRUS (Institutional Repository Usage Statistics) enables institutional repositories (IRs) to share and expose statistics based on the COUNTER standard. It provides an aggregated view of repository usage to benefit organisations, it offers opportunities for benchmarking, and acts as an intermediary between repositories and other agencies.

IRUS collects raw usage data from IRs and processes these data into COUNTER-conformant usage statistics. This provides repositories with comparable, authoritative, standards-based usage data.

IRUS is a community-driven development, responding to user needs….”