Brill Publishes New Open Access Series with Support from Max Planck Institute

Academic publisher Brill is proud to announce the addition of the series Agriculture and the Making of Sciences 1100-1700: Texts, Practices, and Transcultural Transmission of Knowledge in Asia (AMOS) to its publishing portfolio in Asian Studies. All volumes in this series will be published in Open Access with financial support from the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG).

Developing culturally appropriate food literacy resources for Aboriginal children with Foodbank WA’s Superhero Foods® – Tartaglia – – Health Promotion Journal of Australia – Wiley Online Library

On an Australian program to develop OER on aboriginal foods. 

“Key enablers to the success of the resource included: free online access, the highly engaging nature of the resources and adaptability to be implemented across a number of Aboriginal language groups in WA. Ensuring visual representation of healthy choices was fundamental to reinforcing nutrition messaging. Superhero Foods resources are a positive and important inclusion in the health promotion toolbox for Aboriginal children.”

Gold open access—A new era for the Journal of Dairy Science – Journal of Dairy Science

“An ongoing goal of ours has been strengthening the reputation and reach of the Journal of Dairy Science, and a priority has been to provide worldwide and rapid access to journal content to drive impact. We know that supporting innovative content stokes reader interest and sets new platforms for scientific discovery. As such, this move to gold open access has many advantages. First, each author’s work will have increased exposure by enabling access to all readers. Additionally, by publishing in JDS under gold open access, authors can comply with the requirements of many funding agencies and will be in alignment with the Plan S initiative of cOAlition S (https://www.coalition-s.org/) for open access science publishing. The open access model also supports our many partners of public institutions who can now avoid “double paying” to publish and to read JDS content. Gold open access will enhance access to JDS content for dairy scientists and dairy industry professionals in developing countries. JDS remains committed to supporting and participating in AGORA (Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture), a program of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. As with any change, we recognize that this move will bring about some challenges. For example, research-intensive institutions will likely carry greater burdens in supporting publication activities. Open access also brings greater complexity to the ADSA and Fass staff as they work to manage and project workflows and finances under the new model. The ADSA Board of Directors will utilize the superfund to provide a discount for ADSA members to publish in JDS. This superfund member discount will reduce the $1920 APC (the “list price”) to $1600, a savings of $320 per article. Our members represent a global community of dairy scientists; by belonging to ADSA, members enjoy many benefits in addition to reduced APCs, including lower ADSA Annual Meeting and Discover Conference registration fees and access to the online symposium library; members also receive deeply discounted rates to S-PAC among other benefits (https://www.adsa.org/Membership/Benefits-of-Membership). Perhaps most importantly, being a member of ADSA presents numerous opportunities to get involved in the association, acquire leadership skills, and contribute to this scientific and professional community.

As you can imagine, the switch from a hybrid journal to an open access journal requires a high degree of communication and coordination. The following sections describe how this change will happen and what you can expect to see over the next few months….”

Access to Seeds Index 2021 dataset for Western and Central Africa | World Benchmarking Alliance

“On 21 September 2021, we launched the third Access to Seeds Index with a focus on companies in Western and Central Africa. The index assesses seed companies on their efforts to make quality seeds accessible to smallholder farmers.

These companies are assessed using the 2021 Access to Seeds Index, which includes 32 across six measurement areas.

The datasheet contains information on the scores of each of these companies. Scores for each company are publicly available at the indicator level for all stakeholders. Individual company results are presented in company scorecards and detailed assessments….”

India’s NARS should accelerate Open Access | AIMS

“Though the modern information and communications technologies (ICTs) are being used for dissemination of information/technologies to farmers, the same are not being used to the full extent by the NARS institutions for data and information sharing among the researchers and with the world. The institutions under NARS are not showing much importance for sharing the research articles with other stake holders freely. This is because of absence of a policy on sharing and moreover publication of research articles are seen as individual’s job. It is proposed that, National Agricultural Data Centre would be established for web hosting and housing data & information sharing products in NARS.

By that time, it is necessary to formulate a structured policy guidelines on information, data sharing & management that are to be implemented at all levels in NARS system and the standards should be created and enforced at all levels for data collection, analysis and data sharing. An Open Access policy similar to Council of Industrial and Scientific Research (CSIR) and International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics should be adopted by the ICAR and system of accountability and reward for data sharing should also be institutionalised and for accelerate open access movement in NARS’ agriculture research for development.”

PubAg

“PubAg Basics

PubAg is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Agricultural Library’s (NAL) search system for agricultural information. It is available for free on the Internet at: https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/. PubAg is part of the AGRICOLA family of products.
PubAg contains full-text articles relevant to the agricultural sciences, along with citations to peer-reviewed journal articles with links to publisher sites and elsewhere for full-text access.
PubAg’s citations have been enriched through subject analysis and application of terms from NALT (NAL’s Agricultural Thesaurus).
PubAg searching is accomplished by entering your terms in the search box and clicking the Search button. Search suggestions are provided to assist searching.
When multiple terms are entered with no connector, they will be combined in the search with an implicit “AND”.
Using the drop-down menu you can narrow your search of PubAg to terms in the following fields: Title, Author, Subject, or Journal. The default setting is to search “All Fields.”…”

NAL Online Catalog – AGRICOLA

“AGRICOLA (AGRICultural OnLine Access), a database produced by the National Agricultural Library (NAL), consists of two subsets of records. The first contains citations for journal articles that include abstracts. The second consists of bibliographic records describing monographs, serials, audiovisual materials and online content from around the world. AGRICOLA includes but is not limited to resources available in the library. The database contains 5,200,000+ records and includes printed works from as far back as the 15th century.

AGRICOLA records describe publications and resources encompassing all aspects of agriculture and allied disciplines, including animal and veterinary sciences, entomology, plant sciences, forestry, aquaculture and fisheries, farming and farming systems, agricultural economics, extension and education, food and human nutrition, and earth and environmental sciences.

Both data sets are updated daily with newly cataloged and indexed materials. Each may be searched separately, or the two may be searched together. The NAL Catalog (AGRICOLA) may also be accessed on a fee basis through several commercial vendors, either online or on CD-ROM….”

Discover new agriculture content on ScienceOpen: Welcome Journal of Southern Agriculture – ScienceOpen Blog

“ScienceOpen is excited to showcase the latest journal to be indexed on the platform. We have worked with our partners at Compuscript to feature the open access Journal of Southern Agriculture on ScienceOpen to help increase its global dissemination. By being indexed on the platform, the Journal of Southern Agriculture is now in the context of over 71 million scholarly works and benefits from the ScienceOpen Collections Infrastructure.”

3 ways that preprints help researchers in agricultural and plant sciences – The CABI Blog

“The use of preprints (pre-peer reviewed versions of scholarly papers) has accelerated in the last few years with many researchers now sharing their latest work with the scientific community before or in parallel to publication with a journal. After a slower start compared to other research fields, adoption of preprints in the plant sciences and agriculture is growing well.

As part of this growing trend, CABI relaunched agriRxiv (pronounced agri-archive and previously known as AgriXiv) in 2020 as a platform for posting preprints. agriRxiv makes preprints across agriculture and allied sciences available to researchers and gives those who wish to share their papers online an opportunity to gain valuable feedback before submitting a final version to a journal and formal peer-review….”

Webinar ‘Preprints – Accelerating plant sciences and agriculture’

“The use of preprints has accelerated in the last few years with many researchers now sharing their latest work with the scientific community before or in parallel to publication with a journal. After a slower start compared to other research fields, adoption of preprints in the plant sciences and agriculture is growing well.

Why are researchers in plant and agricultural sciences posting preprints? What should you consider before you post a preprint? How does a preprint relate to a journal publication? In this webinar, we will discuss the outlook of preprints in plant sciences and agriculture, explore what can be learned from fields with a longer tradition of preprint use and hear from researchers who have successfully used preprints for the communication of their research.”

Access to biodiversity for food production: Reconciling open access digital sequence information with access and benefit sharing: Molecular Plant

“Over the last 40 years or so, a complex web of international legal agreements was developed that regulate the access, transfer, and use of plant genetic resources. These include the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Nagoya Protocol, and the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources (Figure 1). In developing these legal regimes, policy makers struggled to balance a number of conflicting demands. These included ensuring that access providers share in the benefits that arise from the use of their genetic resources; that users who value-add to genetic resources can protect their innovations via intellectual property; and, at the same time, that scientists and breeders have ongoing access to genetic resources. While there are problems with the existing regimes, they have reached an uneasy compromise of sorts….”

 

 

Access to biodiversity for food production: Reconciling open assess digital sequence information with access and benefit sharing – ScienceDirect

“Over the last forty years or so, a complex web of international legal agreements were developed that regulate the access, transfer, and use of plant genetic resources. These include the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Nagoya Protocol, and the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources (Figure 1). In developing these legal regimes, policy makers struggled to balance a number of conflicting demands. These included ensuring that access providers share in the benefits that arise from the use of their genetic resources; that users who value-add to genetic resources can protect their innovations via intellectual property; and, at the same time, that scientists and breeders have ongoing access to genetic resources. While there are problems with the existing regimes, they have reached an uneasy compromise of sorts. In recent years, dramatic changes in the life sciences have threatened to undermine this complex and fragile balance (Unamba et al., 2015). These changes have been facilitated by new genomic technologies such as gene editing and synthetic biology (McDaniel and Weiss, 2005), by improved and cheaper sequencing technologies (Schaffer, 2007) which rapidly increased the availability of DNA sequence data, and advances in whole genome sequencing (Figure 1). Genomics is now a major source of data, rivalling big data disciplines like astronomy in the pace of data acquisition, storage, and analysis (Stephens et al., 2015). Open access international data repositories, such as GenBank, the DNA Databank of Japan, and European Molecular Biological Laboratory, that house a huge amount of DNA sequencerelated data (estimated at over 1.5 billion sequences) (WiLDSI , 2020) facilitate the sharing and use of digital sequence information (DSI) (Ad Hoc Technical Group on Digital Sequence Information 2015). The scientific value of public databases largely comes from the aggregation of data that allows scientists to identify patterns across the stored sequences (WiLDSI, 2020)….”

Microorganisms | Free Full-Text | Microbiome Research: Open Communication Today, Microbiome Applications in the Future

Abstract:  Microbiome research has recently gained centre-stage in both basic science and translational applications, yet researchers often feel that public communication about its potential overpromises. This manuscript aims to share a perspective on how scientists can engage in more open, ethical and transparent communication using an ongoing research project on food systems microbiomes as a case study. Concrete examples of strategically planned communication efforts are outlined, which aim to inspire and empower other researchers. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on the benefits of open and transparent communication from early-on in innovation pathways, mainly increasing trust in scientific processes and thus paving the way to achieving societal milestones such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the EU Green Deal. View Full-Text