Montreal’s McCord Museum launches remarkable new open access online platform | Arts | thesuburban.com

“To mark its 100th anniversary, the McCord Museum is launching a new open access platform with bilingual descriptions of over 140,000 objects, photographs, and archival documents from its collections. The site also features approximately 130,000 royalty-free images that may be downloaded in the highest resolution available, free of charge, with no restrictions on their use.

Created to provide unparalleled access to the Museum’s collections, the project is a first for the institution. The new platform, whose content will be constantly updated, was launched with the support of the Azrieli Foundation and Canadian Heritage….”

An open-access accelerated adult equivalent of the ABCD Study neuroimaging dataset (a-ABCD) – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  As public access to longitudinal developmental datasets like the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development StudySM (ABCD Study®) increases, so too does the need for resources to benchmark time-dependent effects. Scan-to-scan changes observed with repeated imaging may reflect development but may also reflect practice effects, day-to-day variability in psychological states, and/or measurement noise. Resources that allow disentangling these time-dependent effects will be useful in quantifying actual developmental change. We present an accelerated adult equivalent of the ABCD Study dataset (a-ABCD) using an identical imaging protocol to acquire magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) structural, diffusion-weighted, resting-state and task-based data from eight adults scanned five times over five weeks. We report on the task-based imaging data (n?=?7). In-scanner stop-signal (SST), monetary incentive delay (MID), and emotional n-back (EN-back) task behavioral performance did not change across sessions. Post-scan recognition memory for emotional n-back stimuli, however, did improve as participants became more familiar with the stimuli. Functional MRI analyses revealed that patterns of task-based activation reflecting inhibitory control in the SST, reward success in the MID task, and working memory in the EN-back task were more similar within individuals across repeated scan sessions than between individuals. Within-subject, activity was more consistent across sessions during the EN-back task than in the SST and MID task, demonstrating differences in fMRI data reliability as a function of task. The a-ABCD dataset provides a unique testbed for characterizing the reliability of brain function, structure, and behavior across imaging modalities in adulthood and benchmarking neurodevelopmental change observed in the open-access ABCD Study.

 

Dataset of Indian and Thai banknotes with annotations – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  Multinational banknote detection in real time environment is the open research problem for the research community. Several studies have been conducted for providing solution for fast and accurate recognition of banknotes, detection of counterfeit banknotes, and identification of damaged banknotes. The State-of art techniques like machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL) are dominating the traditional methods of digital image processing technique used for banknote classification. The success of the ML or DL projects heavily depends on size and comprehensiveness of dataset used. The available datasets have the following limitations:

 1. The size of existing Indian dataset is insufficient to train ML or DL projects [1], [2].

 2. The existing dataset fail to cover all denomination classes [1].

 3. The existing dataset does not consists of latest denomination [3].

 4. As per the literature survey there is no public open access dataset is available for Thai banknotes.

To overcome all these limitations we have created a total 3000 image dataset of Indian and Thai banknotes which include 2000 images of Indian banknotes and 1000 images of Thai banknotes. Indian banknotes consist of old and new banknotes of 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 2000 rupees and Thai banknotes consist of 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 Baht.

The Digital Brain Bank, an open access platform for post-mortem datasets | eLife

Abstract:  Post-mortem MRI provides the opportunity to acquire high-resolution datasets to investigate neuroanatomy, and validate the origins of image contrast through microscopy comparisons. We introduce the Digital Brain Bank (open.win.ox.ac.uk/DigitalBrainBank), a data release platform providing open access to curated, multimodal post-mortem neuroimaging datasets. Datasets span three themes – Digital Neuroanatomist: datasets for detailed neuroanatomical investigations; Digital Brain Zoo: datasets for comparative neuroanatomy; Digital Pathologist: datasets for neuropathology investigations. The first Digital Brain Bank release includes twenty one distinctive whole-brain diffusion MRI datasets for structural connectivity investigations, alongside microscopy and complementary MRI modalities. This includes one of the highest-resolution whole-brain human diffusion MRI datasets ever acquired, whole-brain diffusion MRI in fourteen non-human primate species, and one of the largest post-mortem whole-brain cohort imaging studies in neurodegeneration. The Digital Brain Bank is the culmination of our lab’s investment into post-mortem MRI methodology and MRI-microscopy analysis techniques. This manuscript provides a detailed overview of our work with post-mortem imaging to date, including the development of diffusion MRI methods to image large post-mortem samples, including whole, human brains. Taken together, the Digital Brain Bank provides cross-scale, cross-species datasets facilitating the incorporation of post-mortem data into neuroimaging studies.

 

The Digital Brain Bank, an open access platform for post-mortem datasets | eLife

Abstract:  Post-mortem MRI provides the opportunity to acquire high-resolution datasets to investigate neuroanatomy, and validate the origins of image contrast through microscopy comparisons. We introduce the Digital Brain Bank (open.win.ox.ac.uk/DigitalBrainBank), a data release platform providing open access to curated, multimodal post-mortem neuroimaging datasets. Datasets span three themes – Digital Neuroanatomist: datasets for detailed neuroanatomical investigations; Digital Brain Zoo: datasets for comparative neuroanatomy; Digital Pathologist: datasets for neuropathology investigations. The first Digital Brain Bank release includes twenty one distinctive whole-brain diffusion MRI datasets for structural connectivity investigations, alongside microscopy and complementary MRI modalities. This includes one of the highest-resolution whole-brain human diffusion MRI datasets ever acquired, whole-brain diffusion MRI in fourteen non-human primate species, and one of the largest post-mortem whole-brain cohort imaging studies in neurodegeneration. The Digital Brain Bank is the culmination of our lab’s investment into post-mortem MRI methodology and MRI-microscopy analysis techniques. This manuscript provides a detailed overview of our work with post-mortem imaging to date, including the development of diffusion MRI methods to image large post-mortem samples, including whole, human brains. Taken together, the Digital Brain Bank provides cross-scale, cross-species datasets facilitating the incorporation of post-mortem data into neuroimaging studies.

 

Copyright and Open Access in UK Heritage Collections Tickets, Wed 16 Mar 2022 at 14:00 | Eventbrite

“The Towards a National Collection Directorate is pleased to announce a webinar on the topic of copyright and open access in UK heritage collections. Our two speakers, both experts in their fields, have been commissioned by Towards a National Collection to prepare state-of-the-sector reports to open debate on future copyright and open access practice and recommendations. The recommendations they will present are their own and their reports form part of the evidence that Towards a National Collection continues to gather to determine the future policies it will recommend. We look forward to hearing your thoughts in this vital area….”

A Digital Archive of Hieronymus Bosch’s Complete Works: Zoom In & Explore His Surreal Art | Open Culture

“The Bosch Project (aka the Bosch Research and Conservation Project) began in 2010 as a way to bring together the artist’s 45 paintings “spread across 2 continents, 10 countries, 18 cities, and 20 collections” for in-depth research, available to everyone….

Here is where the Bosch Project website shines. The “synchronized image viewers” allow us to zoom in to the smallest brushstroke to examine Bosch’s detailed worlds and characters. And in a nod to his use of triptychs, the other two sides of the painting zoom in as well. It makes for some interesting, but not essential, juxtapositions. It’s also easy to move around in the work with just the scrollwheel of the mouse. Other paintings allow the viewer to examine the infrared reflectogram of the painting’s layers, exposing Bosch’s corrections and deletions. Closer examination of his grand panels reveals Bosch’s cartoonish brushwork, his caricature, and his immense humor. For sure, the artist wanted us to meditate on greater matters like our own salvation, but there’s so much fun in the way he paints animals, or in the bacchanalia of The Garden of Earthly Delights, you can be forgiven for thinking he’d want to party as well. Grab that scroll wheel and check out the Garden—there’s plenty of room. Enter the Bosch Project website here….”

Smithsonian Open Access | Smithsonian Institution

“Welcome to Smithsonian Open Access, where you can download, share, and reuse millions of the Smithsonian’s images—right now, without asking. With new platforms and tools, you have easier access to more than 3.9 million 2D and 3D digital items from our collections—with many more to come. This includes images and data from across the Smithsonian’s 19 museums, nine research centers, libraries, archives, and the National Zoo….”

An Open Access Resource for Functional Brain Connectivity from Fully Awake Marmosets: Open Access Marmoset Functional Connectivity Resource – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is quickly gaining traction as a premier neuroscientific model. However, considerable progress is still needed in understanding the functional and structural organization of the marmoset brain to rival that documented in long-standing preclinical model species, like mice, rats, and Old World primates. To accelerate such progress, we present the Marmoset Functional Connectivity Resource (marmosetbrainconnectome.org), consisting of over 70 hours of resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) data acquired at 500 µm isotropic resolution from 31 fully awake marmosets in a common stereotactic space. Three-dimensional functional connectivity (FC) maps for every cortical and subcortical gray matter voxel are stored online. Users can instantaneously view, manipulate, and download any whole-brain functional connectivity (FC) topology (at the subject- or group-level) along with the raw datasets and preprocessing code. Importantly, researchers can use this resource to test hypotheses about FC directly – with no additional analyses required – yielding whole-brain correlations for any gray matter voxel on demand. We demonstrate the resource’s utility for presurgical planning and comparison with tracer-based structural connectivity as proof of concept. Complementing existing structural connectivity resources for the marmoset brain, the Marmoset Functional Connectivity Resource affords users the distinct advantage of exploring the connectivity of any voxel in the marmoset brain, not limited to injection sites nor constrained by regional atlases. With the entire raw database (RS-fMRI and structural images) and preprocessing code openly available for download and use, we expect this resource to be broadly valuable to test novel hypotheses about the functional organization of the marmoset brain.

 

Endangered archives blog: New online – December 2021

“This project digitised photographs from the Kovats Photographic Museum and Studio in Romania. The vast majority of the photos represent the work of several generations of photographers from the Kovats family. A small part of the photographic archive consists of images created by collaborators of the Kovats studio, and of donations of photographic materials from the local population of Odorheiul Secuiesc…”

Cancers | Free Full-Text | Characterizing Malignant Melanoma Clinically Resembling Seborrheic Keratosis Using Deep Knowledge Transfer

Abstract:  Malignant melanomas resembling seborrheic keratosis (SK-like MMs) are atypical, challenging to diagnose melanoma cases that carry the risk of delayed diagnosis and inadequate treatment. On the other hand, SK may mimic melanoma, producing a ‘false positive’ with unnecessary lesion excisions. The present study proposes a computer-based approach using dermoscopy images for the characterization of S?-like MMs. Dermoscopic images were retrieved from the International Skin Imaging Collaboration archive. Exploiting image embeddings from pretrained convolutional network VGG16, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) classification model on a data set of 667 images. SVM optimal hyperparameter selection was carried out using the Bayesian optimization method. The classifier was tested on an independent data set of 311 images with atypical appearance: MMs had an absence of pigmented network and had an existence of milia-like cysts. SK lacked milia-like cysts and had a pigmented network. Atypical MMs were characterized with a sensitivity and specificity of 78.6% and 84.5%, respectively. The advent of deep learning in image recognition has attracted the interest of computer science towards improved skin lesion diagnosis. Open-source, public access archives of skin images empower further the implementation and validation of computer-based systems that might contribute significantly to complex clinical diagnostic problems such as the characterization of SK-like MMs. 

Nightingale Open Science

“Nightingale Open Science is a platform that connects researchers with world-class medical data. We work closely with health systems around the world to create and curate datasets of medical images linked to ground-truth labels. We carefully deidentify the data and make it available for non-profit research on our cloud infrastructure….

Unfortunately, existing medical data with the potential to shed light on these patterns have historically been siloed. By making this data accessible to broad groups of interdisciplinary researchers, we can begin to unlock discoveries that save lives, surfacing previously unknown patterns of disease….”

 

Images from Wellcome Collection pass 1.5 billion views on Wikipedia | by Alice White | Dec, 2021 | Stacks

“In November, we reached a remarkable milestone: the number of times that images from Wellcome Collection have been viewed on Wikimedia passed 1.5 billion views. This post will talk about how the images got there, how people engage with them, and why it matters that our images are in Wikipedia articles….”

 

How to read biparametric MRI in men with a clinical suspicious of prostate cancer: Pictorial review for beginners with public access to imaging, clinical and histopathological database – PubMed

Abstract:  Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in men with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Performing prostate MRI without the use of an intravenous contrast (IV) agent in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa can lead to reduced MRI scan time. Enabling a large array of different medical providers (from mid-level to specialized radiologists) to evaluate and potentially report prostate MRI in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa with a high accuracy could be one way to enable wide adoption of prostate MRI in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa. The aim of this pictorial review is to provide an insight into acquisition, quality control and reporting of prostate MRI performed without IV contrast agent in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa, aimed specifically at radiologists starting reporting prostate MRI, urologists, urology/radiology residents and mid-level medical providers without experience in reporting prostate MRI. Free public access (http://petiv.utu.fi/improd/and http://petiv.utu.fi/multiimprod/) to complete datasets of 161 and 338 men is provided. The imaging datasets are accompanied by clinical, laboratory and histopathological findings. Several topics are simplified in order to provide a solid base for the development of skills needed for an unsupervised review and potential reporting of prostate MRI in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa. The current review represents the first step towards enabling a large array of different medical providers to review and report accurately prostate MRI performed without IV contrast agent in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa.

 

How to read biparametric MRI in men with a clinical suspicious of prostate cancer: Pictorial review for beginners with public access to imaging, clinical and histopathological database – Ivan Jambor, Alberto Martini, Ugo G Falagario, Otto Ettala, Pekka Taimen, Juha Knaapila, Kari T Syvänen, Aida Steiner, Janne Verho, Ileana M Perez, Harri Merisaari, Paula Vainio, Tarja Lamminen, Jani Saunavaara, Giuseppe Carrieri, Peter J Boström, Hannu J Aronen, 2021

Abstract:  Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in men with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Performing prostate MRI without the use of an intravenous contrast (IV) agent in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa can lead to reduced MRI scan time. Enabling a large array of different medical providers (from mid-level to specialized radiologists) to evaluate and potentially report prostate MRI in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa with a high accuracy could be one way to enable wide adoption of prostate MRI in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa. The aim of this pictorial review is to provide an insight into acquisition, quality control and reporting of prostate MRI performed without IV contrast agent in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa, aimed specifically at radiologists starting reporting prostate MRI, urologists, urology/radiology residents and mid-level medical providers without experience in reporting prostate MRI. Free public access (http://petiv.utu.fi/improd/and http://petiv.utu.fi/multiimprod/) to complete datasets of 161 and 338 men is provided. The imaging datasets are accompanied by clinical, laboratory and histopathological findings. Several topics are simplified in order to provide a solid base for the development of skills needed for an unsupervised review and potential reporting of prostate MRI in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa. The current review represents the first step towards enabling a large array of different medical providers to review and report accurately prostate MRI performed without IV contrast agent in men with a clinical suspicion of PCa.