OpenAIRE, LIBER, SPARC Europe and COAR Launch Joint Strategy to Strengthen the European Repository Network – COAR

“Open science is ushering in a new paradigm for research; one in which all  researchers have unprecedented access to the full corpus of research for analysis, text and data mining, and other novel research methods. A prerequisite for achieving this vision is a strong and well-functioning network of repositories that provides human and machine access to the wide range of valuable research outputs. Repositories also support much needed bibliodiversity in the system as they collect a diverse range of content types, domains and languages, and are fundamental for achieving Europe’s desired changes to research evaluation, whereby “assessment of research, researchers and research organisations recognises the diverse outputs, practices and activities that maximise the quality and impact of research”.

Currently, Europe has one of the most well-developed networks globally with hundreds of repositories hosted by universities, research centres, government departments, and not-for-profit organisations. However, there are significant variations across the European repository landscape with differing levels of support and funding; and, while some countries have strong national coordination, others do not. In a practical sense, this means that some repositories have access to the resources they need to provide a well-functioning service, while others find it a challenge to maintain up-to-date software platforms and suitable staffing levels….

To that end, today OpenAIRE, LIBER, SPARC Europe, and COAR are launching a joint strategy aimed at strengthening the European repository network. Through this strategy we are committed to working together – and with other relevant organisations – to develop and execute an action plan that will reinforce and enhance repositories in Europe. As a first step, we will undertake a survey that will enable us to have a better understanding of the current repository landscape and identify priority areas of action. The survey will be available in February 2023.”

Job: Project Officer | LIBER Europe

LIBER is Europe’s largest research library network. We help our university, national, and special libraries to support world-class research. Founded in 1971 and based in The Hague, LIBER is a partner in many European projects that address barriers on the path towards Open Science. LIBER is seeking a Project Officer (with a focus on dissemination, communication & engagement) to organise European project-related events and activities and to work on other project-related tasks.

LIBER Strategy Report 2022: Year in Review

“We are delighted to have started work in three new projects, DIAMAS (Developing Institutional Open Access Publishing Models to Advance Scholarly Communication), the CeOS_SE Project (Citizen-Enhanced Open Science in Southeastern Europe Higher Education Knowledge Hubs) and LibrarIN (Value Co-Creation and Social Innovation for a New Generation of European Libraries). We continue our active participation in four existing international projects, MES-CoBraD, ReCreating Europe, Open Research Europe (ORE) and Knowledge Rights 21. Finally, we concluded three projects, European Language Equality (ELE), Integrating Open and Citizen Science into Active Learning Approaches in Higher Education (INOS), and Social Sciences and Humanities for the European Open Science Cloud (SSHOC), successfully….”

 

Strategy 2023-2027 – LIBER Europe

“Our strategy for the period 2023-2027 focuses on leading developments to get ahead of radical changes happening in the research landscape.

We have identified top driving factors that will affect research libraries and LIBER, and formulated strategic undertakings to maintain our strong position in enabling world-class research….

By 2027, in collaboration with researchers, research libraries stimulate, facilitate, co-develop and manage infrastructures and practices designed to take Open Science to the next level….”

LIBER Takes the Lead in Secondary Publishing Rights Work Package for the Knowledge Rights 21 Programme | LIBER Europe

The Knowledge Rights 21 Programme works to provide research and insights and that will create positive change in copyright policy making. One of its work packages consists of looking at Secondary Publishing Rights, and paving the way toward immediate republication of publicly funded research on open access repositories, regardless of publisher contracts. LIBER will carry out research on current national legislation and good practices for Secondary Publishing Rights across Europe.

 

A Position Statement from Knowledge Rights 21 on Secondary Publishing Rights

“Academic authors traditionally routinely assign their copyright to proprietary publishers, or do not retain sufficient rights allowing them or their funders to republish or reuse their own work. This practice stands in opposition to the aim of education and research – to maximise the impact of research by sharing it as widely as possible in a timely manner. Knowledge Rights 21 believes that European countries should introduce secondary publishing rights in respect of publicly funded research into all national laws, which in the case of the EU member states could be best facilitated by a European Directive or Regulation….”

Secondary Publishing Rights – New Position Statement from Knowledge Rights 21 – Knowledge Rights 21

“Another, more comprehensive approach has been taken by a number of individual European countries who have established in law the right to republish publicly funded articles irrespective of publisher contracts. Such “secondary publishing rights” – a concept which refers to the right to republish publicly funded research after its first publication in an open access repository or elsewhere – are another key tool for promoting Open Access (OA).

Launched today, Knowledge Rights 21’s position statement on secondary publishing rights supports LIBER’s Zero Embargo campaign and secondary publishing rights model law.

KR21 calls on the national governments of Europe as well as the European Union to introduce secondary publishing laws which enable immediate access to publicly funded research in article or book chapter form….”

Community Hubs for Citizen Science: Building Capacity through Libraries and Universities – LIBER Europe

“Citizen science aims to enable people of all ages, cultures, and skills to engage in real scientific research by collecting or analyzing data typically shared with professional scientists, while provenly increasing public understanding of science. SciStarter.org and Arizona State University, as well as LIBER, are building and scaling programs and resources to catalyze libraries as community hubs for citizen science.

As a result, libraries are supporting an evolving workforce and lifelong learners while addressing known critical barriers in citizen science infrastructure, including lack of 1) project awareness, 2) access to instruments, and 3) community connections.

LIBER Citizen Science Working Group and SciStarter are now organizing a three-part joint webinar series. In this first session, we will examine the realized and potential role of libraries in catalyzing and accelerating participatory science. Darlene Cavalier (SciStarter and Arizona State University, USA), Robin Salthouse (retired librarian and advisor to SciStarter, USA), and the Science shop/Boutique des sciences, University of Lille, France (to be confirmed) will share their experiences and resources to enable everyone to participate in this collaborative and open approach of research and science. Raphaëlle Bats (Urfist – University of Bordeaux, France) and Sara Decoster (KU Leuven, Belgium) will moderate the series….”

Knowledge Rights 21 – 21st Century Access to Culture, Learning & Research

“The programme Knowledge Rights 21 (KR21) is focused on bringing about changes in legislation and practice across Europe that will strengthen the right of all to knowledge. It is built on a conviction that knowledge is essential for education, innovation and cultural participation, and that everyone should have the possibility – in particular through libraries, archives and digitally – to access and use it….

FIM4L Working Group in Talks with Elsevier — Towards Federated Access Best Practices – LIBER Europe

“At the beginning of 2022, the LIBER FIM4L Working Group and Elsevier held a series of talks on the topic of federated access. 

Federated access, also called Shibboleth or SSO, can be used by libraries to provide access to electronic resources. During the login process information about the user is (often) exchanged with the publisher. The library, publisher, and user can decide which information to share…

Points of consideration for anonymous login:

Not all Elsevier products support anonymity.
If an anonymous, logged-in user decides to set up alerts at e.g. Sciencedirect, they will be informed that they should log in first. Then they probably create a new user account, perhaps apart from an existing one, and their current session gets terminated.
When an identified user logs out, they cannot log in anonymously anymore in that session.

 

If anonymous login would be officially supported by a publisher, then it is important to inform a user using very clear communication. This is difficult for two reasons: Users do not understand these login differences and there could always be cases during the user’s journey where they might not at all be informed….”

Designing an Open Peer Review Process for Open Access Guides | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Simon Worthington

The LIBER Citizen Science Working Group is embarking on the design of an open peer review process for the guidebook series being published on the topic of citizen science for research libraries. The LIBER working group in collaboration with COPIM is looking for input and feedback on the design of the open peer review workflow. COPIM is supporting the working group by contributing its experience and knowledge of open access book publishing, with respect to collaborative post-publication input, community peer review processes, and reuse. The first section of the guide Citizen Science Skilling for Library Staff, Researchers, and the Public has already been published with three more sections to follow.

 

The Empty Library: The Urgency of Solutions to Unsustainable eBook Markets, May 19, 2022 @ 2pm (CEST) | LIBER Europe

The freedom for libraries to acquire books and develop a collection. A relic of a pre-digital age? Or an ongoing issue in dire need of action? Who and what determines what libraries, both public and academic, can offer: user needs vs publishers’ policies? And how can we protect the rights of access to education, knowledge, and cultural participation?

Join Knowledge Rights 21 for their first webinar and hear what experts have to say on these topics.

The situation facing libraries when working with eBooks is a key theme of the Knowledge Rights 21 Programme. In the webinar, you will learn all about KR21, and the latest developments around eBooks in different parts of Europe. Finally, they will be discussing the solutions being pursued.

Keys takeaways will be:
– A strong understanding of the issues around eBooks in libraries today,
– Opportunities open to libraries under the wider Knowledge Rights 21 Programme,
– An open invitation to help us shape the Programme’s next steps on eBooks.

Speakers:

Benjamin White, Chair of LIBER’s Copyright and Legal Matters Working Group, researcher at Bournemouth University’s Centre for Intellectual Property Policy & Management.
Barbara Schleihagen, Executive Director, German Library Association
Cathal McCauley, University Librarian, Maynooth University.

 

Four Urgent Recommendations for Open Access Negotiations with Publishers 2022 | LIBER Europe

LIBER, Europe’s leading association of research libraries, presents four urgent recommendations for libraries to use when conducting Open Access negotiations with publishers. This document builds on the Five Principles for Open Access Negotiations with Publishers of 2017, considering the new benchmarks in the landscape in publisher negotiations as well as the body of negotiation principles and recommendations that have, in the meantime, been embraced by LIBER institutions.