COAR & SPARC Welcome Tina Baich as Visiting Program Officer for Repository Network in the United States – SPARC

“COAR and SPARC have a shared vision of creating a global, open knowledge sharing system that centers diversity, equity, and inclusion, and we believe repositories play a central role in achieving this vision.

To that end, we are delighted to announce that Tina Baich will be taking on the position as Visiting Program Officer for US Repository Network beginning on September 1, 2021. Tina is Senior Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication & Content Strategies at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis and is responsible for the leadership, strategic vision, and overall management of the library’s scholarly communication and collection/content activities and initiatives. Tina will spend about a quarter of her time in the newly established role….

A strong vision for repositories in the US, along with collective actions that ensure their quality, sustainability and interoperability, will greatly benefit the scholarly community, and will contribute to the development of a global knowledge sharing system that is both open by default and equitable by design. With the introduction of significant new functionalities through the COAR Next Generation Repositories Initiative and the COAR Notify Project, repositories are poised to take on a more expansive and innovative role in scholarly communications….”

LIBER and COAR Join Forces to Strengthen the Role of Repositories in Europe – COAR

“LIBER and COAR have signed a partnership agreement with the aim of strengthening the role of repositories in Europe. This new agreement provides a framework for joint strategic actions that will reinforce the important role of libraries in sustaining and advancing open repositories in the region.

“Repositories are critical infrastructure components for open science and most European research libraries maintain at least one repository,” says LIBER President Jeannette Frey. “This new agreement defines common objectives and will ensure an enduring role for libraries in the scholarly communications ecosystem,” continues Frey. “We look forward to working with COAR to strengthen the role of repositories in 2021 and beyond.”

The Partnership Agreement outlines a number of collaborative activities including:

Promoting the role of repositories in open access and open science in Europe
Developing sustainable models for repositories and repository networks, and
Advancing new innovations in the repository landscape, such as the COAR Notify Project…”

ASAPbio / COAR Survey on Preprint Sharing in Repositories

“The aim of this survey is to assess the levels of preprint sharing taking place using generalist repositories.

A preprint is defined as a scientific manuscript without peer-review typically submitted to a public server/ repository by the author. [Definition adapted from ASAPbio description].
A generalist repository is a repository that collects content from a variety of domains and content types, such as institutional, national and international repositories (e.g. Zenodo, HAL, Harvard’s DASH repository)

With the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen a rise in researchers sharing their preprints. Traditionally, institutional and generalist repositories have not played a significant role in hosting these objects. However, as the sharing of preprints becomes more widely embraced, these types of repositories are obvious mechanisms to expand the preprint ecosystem internationally, without having to launch new preprint services.

This survey is targeted at institutional and other generalist repositories to gauge their current activities and future plans related to the collection of preprints. The survey will take only about 5 minutes and will be open from August 4 – September 10, 2021….”

Home | COAR Asia OA Meeting 2021: Innovation, Growth and Sustainability of Open Scholarship in Asia (Oct 25-27, 2021) | SMU Libraries

The virtual 6th meeting of COAR Asia OA will be held 25-27 October 2021. The meeting will discuss the latest trends in open access and open scholarship, with community updates from Asia. Topics include open access infrastructure, open educational resources, open peer review, research data repositories, and tools built on open data. The meeting will be a venue for information exchange between Asian communities.

Programme: https://library.smu.edu.sg/asiaoa2021#programme

COAR releases resource types vocabulary version 3.0 for repositories with new look and feel – COAR

“We are pleased to announce the release of version 3.0 of the resource types vocabulary. Since 2015, three COAR Controlled Vocabularies have been developed and are maintained by the Controlled Vocabulary Editorial Board: Resource types, access rights and version types.  These vocabularies have a new look and are now being managed using the iQvoc platform, hosted by the University of Vienna Library.

Using controlled vocabularies enables repositories to be consistent in describing their resources, helps with search and discovery of content, and allows machine readability for interoperability. The COAR vocabularies are available in several languages, supporting multilingualism across repositories. They also play a key role in making semantic artifacts and repositories compliant with the FAIR Principles, in particular when it comes to findability and interoperability….”

Catalyzing the Creation of a Repository Network in the US – COAR

“COAR and SPARC have a shared vision of creating a global, open knowledge sharing system that centers diversity, equity, and inclusion, and we believe repositories play a central role in achieving this vision.

This is an important moment in time, in which open scholarship is more visible and widely-embraced than ever before. The urgency of addressing the COVID-19 pandemic has led many researchers to eagerly embrace new, faster ways of sharing their research papers, data, and more via repositories and other open platforms. There is a renewed interest in community ownership of both infrastructure and content, and a spotlight on empowering author’s rights retention due to new funder requirements, such as Plan S. There is also a growing recognition of the pressing need to intentionally build channels for greater inclusiveness and diversity of voices in the research communication system, as underscored in the UNESCO draft recommendations which were developed through consensus by over 100 member countries.

Yet, against this backdrop of encouraging developments, the trend toward commercial concentration in the publishing industry continues unabated. This consolidation exacerbates a number of serious problems in the system, including unacceptably high and ever-increasing costs for subscriptions and APCs (article processing charges). It also contributes to a steady decline in the diversity of publishing outlets and options – decreasing bibliodiversity, which is fundamental for a healthy ecosystem.

Individual repositories and a global repository network are critical infrastructure that provide the community with means for resisting this consolidation. Repositories are localized and can respond to different users’ needs, advancing equity and diversity in the scholarly communications ecosystem. When they are resourced properly, they are sustainable and long-lived, and because they are mostly managed by research institutions and their libraries, they are operated in a manner consistent with the academic community’s values. Moreover, repositories exemplify the key role institutions must play in preserving, curating, and making accessible content that would otherwise be unavailable to the world….”

Catalyzing the Creation of a Repository Network in the US – SPARC

“This is an important moment in time, in which open scholarship is more visible and widely-embraced than ever before. The urgency of addressing the COVID-19 pandemic has led many researchers to eagerly embrace new, faster ways of sharing their research papers, data, and more via repositories and other open platforms. There is a renewed interest in community ownership of both infrastructure and content, and a spotlight on empowering author’s rights retention due to new funder requirements, such as Plan S. There is also a growing recognition of the pressing need to intentionally build channels for greater inclusiveness and diversity of voices in the research communication system, as underscored in the UNESCO draft recommendations which were developed through consensus by over 100 member countries.

Yet, against this backdrop of encouraging developments, the trend toward commercial concentration in the publishing industry continues unabated. This consolidation exacerbates a number of serious problems in the system, including unacceptably high and ever-increasing costs for subscriptions and APCs (article processing charges). It also contributes to a steady decline in the diversity of publishing outlets and options – decreasing bibliodiversity, which is fundamental for a healthy ecosystem….

 

With this context in mind, COAR and SPARC believe that it is a critical time to support and better organize the repository network in the US. This is part of an ongoing global effort led by COAR to work with national and regional organizations to enhance the role of repositories internationally. A strong vision for repositories in the US, along with collective actions that ensure their quality, sustainability and interoperability, will greatly benefit the scholarly community, and will contribute to the development of a global knowledge sharing system that is both open by default and equitable by design. …”

Visiting Program Officer for U.S. Repository Network

“COAR and SPARC have a shared vision of creating a global open knowledge sharing system that centers diversity, equity, and inclusion, and we believe repositories will play a central role in achieving this vision

We are at a critical moment for the open movement. Policy makers have largely embraced the values underlying open access and open science and are adopting and strengthening their policies. However, the path towards open scholarship and what infrastructures will be prioritized remains to be seen. University repositories play an important role in enabling open scholarship, and, critically, they support diversity, equity and inclusion in scholarly communications by offering a sustainable option for researchers to make their research outputs available to the world. A strong global repository network has the potential to transform the scholarly communication system, from one predominantly controlled by the commercial sector, to one which is managed and governed by the scholarly community. 

SPARC, a project of the New Venture Fund, is seeking a Visiting Program Officer (VPO) to help consolidate and advance the network of repositories in the United States. The aim is to ensure that university repositories have a voice at the table with other stakeholder communities, adopt interoperable good practices, and are innovative….”

“No Publication Favelas! Latin America’s Vision for Open Access” by Monica Berger | ACRL 2021 presentation

by Monica Berger, CUNY New York City College of Technology

Abstract: Open access was intended to be the great equalizer but its promise has not come to fruition in many lower-income countries of the Global South. Under-resourcing is only one of the many reasons why these scholars and publishers are marginalized. In order to examine inequality in our global scholarly communications system, we can compare a negative and a positive outgrowth of this imbalance. Predatory publishing represents a a weak imitation of traditional, commercial journal publishing. In contrast, Latin America’s community-based, quality scholarly infrastructure is anti-colonial. It can be argued that Latin America’s publishing infrastructure represents one solution to predatory publishing. As the future of open access is debated, it is critical that we look to Latin America as we support new models that reject legacy commercial journal publishing and support bibliodiversity.

Jeffrey Beall infamously called Brazil’s SciELO a “publishing favela” or slum. Yet Latin America represents an important exception to the problem of underdevelopment of scholarly communications in the Global South. In order to begin to better understand the marginalization of the Global South and Latin America’s success, we need to unpack the history of open access, its overemphasis on the reader as opposed to the author, and how notions of development influenced its discourse. This focus on the reader is neo-Colonialist, positioning scholars from the Global South as “downloaders” and not “uploaders,” whose scholarship is peripheral.

Lacking alternative publishing options, predatory publishing, or amateurish, low quality publishing, exploited this gap. In its pathetic imitation of international, corporate publishing, predatory publishing is neo-Colonial and a form of “faux” open access where subaltern authors, editors, and publishers poorly imitate Global North corporate publishing. Predatory publishing is a sad simulacra with real world damage. Since predatory publishing is overwhelming based in the Global South and many of its authors based in the Global South, it tarnishes the reputation of all scholarship from less developed countries. In contrast, predatory authorship and publishing are rare in Latin America.

Latin America is an exemplar of sustainable and humane open access. Heather Morrison deemed Latin American as a “long-time peerless leader in open access.” The advent of Plan S, a rapid flip to open access, is accelerating the co-option of open access by large, commercial publishers predicating a variety of negative outcomes. In contrast, the Latin American concept of bibliodiversity represents an important alternative model. No one size fits all and a local vision governs. Bibliodiversity interrogates the presumption that all scholarship must be English-language. It also values indigenous and local knowledge as well as lay readers. Redalyc and SciELO include measures for research collaboration. Various regional scholarly organizations cooperate, sharing expertise, providing training in editorial and technical best practices. This cooperation has expanded to a global scale. The Confederation of Open Access Repositories and SPARC are partnering with LA Referencia and others, expanding Latin America’s vision globally, generating a meaningful alternative model for open access.

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Slides with talk transcript and sources as presented at the Association of College and Research Libraries conference, ACRL 2021: Ascending into an Open Future, held virtually, April 16, 2021.