CORE: Our commitment to The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure – CORE

The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI) offer a set of guidelines by which open scholarly infrastructure organisations and initiatives that support the research community can be operated and sustained. In this post, we demonstrate CORE’s commitment to adhere to these principles and show our current progress in achieving these aims. The principles are divided into three main categories; Governance, Sustainability and Insurance:

What we are working on: 2022-05-20 | Invest in Open Infrastructure

“…What we are working on: We shared our plans for the Catalog of Open Infrastructure Services (COIs)! We invite all open infrastructure service providers to express your interest to be included in the next release of COIs, to help further iterate on our current prototype and build towards a more streamlined, robust backend while also increasing the number of projects represented. Read our blog post to find out more.

As part of this work, we organized two Q&A sessions where we discussed and addressed questions from the community. You can find the recordings, slides, and shared notes on our blog.

In parallel, we are planning some additional testing with stakeholders to further inform the design of the next release of COIs and to better understand its value proposition and utility.

We are planning a short virtual team retreat at the beginning of June to reflect on our work so far and refine our roadmap for the next half a year.

To further anchor our research and engagement strategies, we are constructing persona profiles of our key stakeholders and audience, based on our experience and quantitative data that we have from our communication channels.

We welcome Ravin Cline to the team! Ravin is a PhD student in Public and Nonprofit Management at the University of Texas, Dallas, as well as the founder and Executive Director of a US-based nonprofit focused on helping immigrants find self-sufficiency and significance through education and counsel. Ravin will be expanding our understanding of governance with a review of the current literature on nonprofit governance to advance our advocacy for more and better community-focused governance of open infrastructure services….”

Community workshop to respond to UNESCO’s global call for best practices in open science

“Further to the adoption of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science in November 2021, UNESCO is launching a Global Call for Best Practices in Open Science. This call aims to collect best practices in open science at individual, institutional, national, regional, and international levels with a particular focus on the seven priority areas of action highlighted in the Recommendation.

Invest in Open Infrastructure (IOI) has been working to conduct research to provide strategic support and investment guidance to funders, budget holders, policymakers, and other stakeholders on investing in open infrastructure for scholarship and research. To this end, we wish to work with our community to contribute to this Global Call, to gather our experiences to identify best practices in supporting, adopting, using, and contributing to open infrastructure.

To this end, we are collaborating with the Turing Way, the Tools, Practices & Systems (TPS) Programme at the Alan Turing Institute, and Open Life Science to create a series of three 90-min community workshops. Each workshop is hosted by a hosting organization/initiative and will focus on one or two priority areas of action that is/are most central to that community’s work. We invite everyone interested in learning more about others’ practices in supporting open science and open infrastructure to participate in our workshops to contribute to a community response to the UNESCO call.

Wednesday 8 June 2022, 10-11:30 am EDT (see this in your time zone): On “investing in open science infrastructures and services“ hosted by IOI; register here

Wednesday 15 June 2022, 10-11:30 am EDT (see this in your time zone): On “promoting innovative approaches for open science at different stages of the scientific process“ and “promoting international and multi-stakeholder cooperation in the context of open science and with a view to reducing digital, technological and knowledge gaps” hosted by the Turing Way and the TPS Programme; register here

Wednesday 22 June 2022, 10-11:30 am EDT (see this in your time zone): On “investing in human resources, training, education, digital literacy and capacity building for open science“ and, “fostering a culture of open science and aligning incentives for open science” hosted by Open Life Science; register here

We will draft a community response to the UNESCO call based on the input from the session and will share our response publicly upon submission….”

Solving medicine’s data bottleneck: Nightingale Open Science | Nature Medicine

“Open datasets, curated around unsolved medical problems, are vital to the development of computational research in medicine, but remain in short supply. Nightingale Open Science, a non-profit computing platform, was founded to catalyse research in this nascent field….”

COAR Welcomes Significant Funding for the Notify Project

We are delighted to announce that COAR has been awarded a US$4 million grant from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. The 4 year grant will go towards the COAR Notify Project, which is developing and implementing a standard protocol for connecting the content in the distributed repository network with peer reviews and assessments in external services, using linked data notifications.

Why did clinical trial registries fail to prevent Covid research chaos?

“There is a long-standing global ethical obligation to register all trials before they start, shored up by regulatory requirements in some jurisdictions. Data from 18 registries worldwide feed into the WHO-managed International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), providing a continuously updated overview of who is researching what, when, where and how – at least in theory.

 

 

If the registry infrastructure had worked and been used as intended, much of the COVID-19 research chaos would have been avoided.

 

 

For example, researchers considering launching a hydroxychloroquine trial could have searched ICTRP and discovered that the drug was already being investigated by numerous other trials. Those researchers could accordingly have focused on investigating other treatment options instead, or aligned their outcome measures with existing trials. …

The global registry infrastructure has long been inadequately supported by legislators and regulators, and is woefully underfunded.

 

 

 

This persistent neglect of the world’s only comprehensive directory of medical research led to costly research waste on an incredible scale during the pandemic.

 

 

The WHO recommends that member states should by law require every interventional trial to be registered and reported. In addition, WHO recommends that all trial results should be made public specifically on a registry within 12 months, and that registry data should be kept up to date.

 

 

 

By enforcing these three simple rules, regulators would ensure that there is a comprehensive, up-to-date global database of all trials and their results.

 

In reality, existing laws in the EU and the US only cover a small minority of trials and are not being effectively enforced, while many other jurisdictions have no relevant laws at all. …”

 

 

How the Open Book Collective works | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Livy Onalee Snyder and Joe Deville

The Open Book Collective (OBC) is a non-profit membership organization that brings together Open Access (OA) publishers, service providers, librarians, and other supporters to collectively bring about a fairer, more sustainable model of open book publishing. 

Through the OBC’s online platform, publishers and service providers offer individual and collective membership packages which libraries and other potential supporters can pay to join.

[…]

 

Welcome – Research Portal Denmark

“The portal is an initiative to build a comprehensive national research infrastructure, dedicated to

Collecting and organising data on Danish research – input, output and impact
Building public user services that facilitate the discovery and exploration of Danish research

We’re in the early phases of this build-up. New data and features are added continuously.

Use the menu to the left to learn more about the initiative or to sign  up to receive news via email….”

Supporting knowledge creation and sharing by building a standardised interconnected repository of biodiversity data | Zenodo

“This EOSC in practice story was developed within the Cos4cloud project and targets a very wide user base as it is addressed to any researchers, teachers, students, companies, institutions and, more generally, anyone interested in knowing, studying or analysing biodiversity information.

The story presents Cos4Bio, a co-designed, interoperable and open-source service that integrates biodiversity observations from multiple citizen observatories in one place, allowing experts to save time in the species identification process and get access to an enormous number of biodiversity observations. This resource is available on the EOSC Portal Catalogue and Marketplace …”

Supporting knowledge creation and sharing by building a standardised interconnected repository of biodiversity data | EOSC Portal

“This EOSC in practice story targets a very wide user base as it is addressed to any researchers, teachers, students, companies, institutions and, more generally, anyone interested in knowing, studying or analysing biodiversity information. It was developed within the Cos4cloud project….

Cos4Bio is a co-designed, interoperable and open-source service that integrates biodiversity observations from multiple citizen observatories in one place, allowing experts to save time in the species identification process and get access to an enormous number of biodiversity observations….”

Leslie Chan: Is Open Scholarship Possible without Open Infrastructure? – Digital Humanities Summer Institute | 7 June 2022

“Abstract: Recently, several collaborators and I submitted a chapter proposal in response to a call for submission to a volume on critical infrastructure studies and digital humanities. The editors did not accept our proposal. They cited the high number of submissions and the “word limit” specified by the university press contracted for the volume as the reason. In this talk, I like to reflect on how networked possibilities (the multimodal forms of scholarly artifacts and modes of engagements) are still being dictated by the properties of print and it’s associated academic capital. In the meantime, much of the critical infrastructures necessary for networked open scholarship are increasingly being designed and controlled by a small handful of multinational corporate publishers turned data analytics cartel. The creation of end-to-end knowledge production and evaluation platform and its inscribed logic of data extraction has enormous implications for our aspirations for open scholarship, particularly for early career scholars. We may still be focused on infrastructures as the object of study, but we should be more concerned with how infrastructures govern our labour and scholarly practices and, above all, our autonomy. The talk will provide suggestions on how best to design community governance over infrastructure, instead of being governed by infrastructures not by our design.”

Is Infrastructure Consolidation the Next Step? CCC Acquires Ringgold – The Scholarly Kitchen

“It seems that barely a month goes by these days without another acquisition in the scholarly communications and publishing space. Most of the attention has focused on major acquisitions by Elsevier and Clarivate, particularly Elsevier’s recent acquisition of interfolio, the company behind the reporting tool researchFish, and Clarivate’s purchase of ProQuest at the end of last year. And to be sure, their movement towards scholarly workflow tools and platforms is an extremely important development. The recent news that the Copyright Clearance Center will acquire Ringgold is an important reminder that many other firms, including not-for-profits, are actively pursuing growth strategies that contain elements other than organic growth. It is also another confirmation of the extreme strategic value of infrastructure, including in particular the persistent identifiers, lovingly known as PIDs, that is needed to advance scholarly communication in an increasingly open access environment. And it raises the question of whether infrastructure will be managed openly through community governed organizations or the extent to which the sector can live with its privatization….”

Next steps for the Catalog of Open Infrastructure Services (COIs) | 2022-05-09 | Invest in Open Infrastructure

“We invite open infrastructure service providers to express interest in being added to the next release of the COIs….

We are releasing the COIs documentation. This documentation is the primary resource for understanding the background, content, and key frameworks for COIs. We define key terms, describe key inputs, and articulate our internal decision-making on what content we included and how we chose to display it in order to inform and engage users of COIs, as well as support those interested in submitting information on services not already included in COIs.

We are launching an interest survey for open infrastructure service providers who are interested in being added to the next release of COIs. In this short survey, we ask service providers to assess their information on the key areas covered in COIs, and how they would like to submit that information to and maintain it on COIs. We would like to invite a broad range of open infrastructure service providers, e.g. of different sizes, governance models, and geographical areas, to take part in this survey. This would help build a more comprehensive understanding of the diversity of data types and practices, and increase the resilience of COIs, its infrastructure and processes.

Contribute to developing COIs — We can only move COIs and this work forward with the support of open infrastructure services providers. You can help by expressing your interest in being added to the next release of COIs by filling in the Interest survey, by June 20.

We also invite everyone interested to read and comment on the COIs documentation to help improve the value, usability, scalability and overall user experience of COIs.

We are organizing two Q&A sessions on Tuesday, May 17, 2022 to further discuss these plans with the community and answer any questions you may have: Session 1: 10 am EDT (see this in your time zone) – register here. / Session 2: 7 pm EDT (see this in your time zone) – register here. The sessions will be recorded, and the recordings and a short recap will be shared here on our blog. We look forward to meeting you at one of the sessions!…”

BAD Project – COKI

“The Book Analytics Dashboard Project (2022-2025) is focused on creating a sustainable OA Book focused analytics service. This service is needed to safeguard and support diversity in the voices, perspectives, geographies, topics and languages made visible through OA Books. Funded by the Mellon Foundation, the Book Analytics Dashboard project is building on an earlier Mellon-funded initiative: Developing a Pilot Data Trust for OA eBook Usage (2020 – 2022). In addition to scaling workflows, infrastructure and customer support, the Demonstration Project is developing a long-term plan for housing, maintenance and funding of the analytics service as a sustainable community infrastructure….”

Open Science in the recently adopted Resolution on the Slovenian Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy 2030 – OpenAIRE Blog

“At the end of March 2022, the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia adopted the Resolution on the Slovenian Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy 2030 which was published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia in April 2022. This is a key Slovenian strategic document for research and innovation until 2030, which will be the basis for formulating policies related to social and economic development as well as to societal challenges. The Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy is inextricably intertwined with the Resolution on National Programme of Higher Education 2030, and both are harmonized with the Slovenian Development Strategy 2030. At the implementation level, the Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy will be supplemented by action plans and sectoral strategic documents (e.g., Research Infrastructure Development Plan, Open Science Action Plan, Action Plan for Technology Transfer Offices, Equal Opportunities Action Plan), which will define the set goals and upgrade them with measurable monitoring indicators.

The Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy, which is based on the Article 10 of the new Scientific Research and Innovation Activities Act, introduces Open Science as an important integral part of the scientific research. In the context of the horizontal objectives under Item 6.2., the Strategy defines six key measures in the field of Open Science, as follows:

1. Effective management and financing of the development of the national Open Science ecosystem and related national structures and infrastructures, ensuring their international alignment as well as integration into international associations and infrastructures.

2. Introduction of modern approaches to the evaluation of scientific research activity in accordance with Open Science principles to increase the quality and impact of research (e.g., DORA – San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment, Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, ERAC – European Research Area and Innovation Committee Guidelines).

3. Ensuring that the results of scientific research comply with the FAIR principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable), and that full and immediate open access is provided (subject to legitimate exceptions).

4. Establishment of a National Open Science Community for the introduction and monitoring of Open Science in Slovenia, as well as its integration into ERA and beyond.

5. Promoting the development of citizen science and public involvement in scientific research.

6. Promoting the development of a national scientific publishing system to operate according to the principles of Open Science.

These measures, which are recognised as essential for the development of Open Science in Slovenia, are the basis for the Action Plan on Open Science in preparation. Its adoption by the Government of the Republic of Slovenia is expected later this year.”