The ideal model, if you ask me | Openjournals.nl

“We invited a number of (lead) editors to tell us about their journals and the reasons why they chose to work with Openjournals.nl. Sible Andringa, editor-in-chief of the Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics, kicks off. He feels that the journal has become more attractive to authors since switching to Openjournals and he explains why his editors quit working with a traditional publisher.

Sible Andringa: ‘The journal Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics (DuJAL) has been around for a long time. It started as the Journal of Applied Linguistics in Articles. The first volume was published in-house in 1976. From the beginning, the journal was published by the Dutch Association of Applied Linguistics Anéla (see www.anela.nl). In 2012, it was decided to change its name. The journal was renamed Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics and it has since been published by  John Benjamins. In January 2021, the journal moved to Openjournals….

With Openjournals, you can choose to offer all that together: pre- and post-prints are not necessary, and all data and instruments can be co-published. The ideal model, if you ask me. We can now also think about all kinds of new forms of publishing, such as publishing conference posters and the like. Those conversations we can now have, because we know it is possible and allowed by the publisher. We find that we have become more attractive to authors now that we are open access and publish on an ongoing basis.  There are not huge numbers of submissions right away, but a steady stream of good quality.”

RAISE Project: a Game Changer for OS

The real value of open data for the research community is not to access them, but to process them as conveniently as possible in order to reduce time-to-result and increase productivity. RAISE project will provide the infrastructure for a distributed crowdsourced data processing system, moving from open data to open access data for processing. 

Funding Open Infrastructure as a Public Utility: A Preliminary Investigation in Water Utility Funding | Invest in Open Infrastructure, Jan 23, 2023

“In our engagements with infrastructure service providers, one of their biggest challenges we’ve repeatedly heard is the need for more stable funding for infrastructure services. Providers are developing more innovative strategies to sustain their work. However, through our conversations and analysis of funding trends, it became apparent that funding in the open infrastructure space remains largely unpredictable, and many providers continue to search for more stable and reliable sources of revenue to ensure the sustainability of the services they provide. In understanding how a stable and reliable model for funding open infrastructure in research and scholarly communication could be architected, we looked at how public utilities, in particular water utilities, are funded around the world. Today, we share a report from our preliminary investigation into water utility funding. Drawing on some of the preeminent literature and guidance on the topic from widely respected organizations (the OECD, WHO, and IRC), we highlight some key lessons for funding a robust infrastructure of open services. Key to this is understanding knowledge as a public good, like water, electricity, and natural gas, and how these vital public goods are best funded for reliable, robust, and sustainable supply in the long term….”

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7076158

An iterative and interdisciplinary categorisation process towards FAIRer digital resources for sensitive life-sciences data | Scientific Reports

Abstract:  For life science infrastructures, sensitive data generate an additional layer of complexity. Cross-domain categorisation and discovery of digital resources related to sensitive data presents major interoperability challenges. To support this FAIRification process, a toolbox demonstrator aiming at support for discovery of digital objects related to sensitive data (e.g., regulations, guidelines, best practice, tools) has been developed. The toolbox is based upon a categorisation system developed and harmonised across a cluster of 6 life science research infrastructures. Three different versions were built, tested by subsequent pilot studies, finally leading to a system with 7 main categories (sensitive data type, resource type, research field, data type, stage in data sharing life cycle, geographical scope, specific topics). 109 resources attached with the tags in pilot study 3 were used as the initial content for the toolbox demonstrator, a software tool allowing searching of digital objects linked to sensitive data with filtering based upon the categorisation system. Important next steps are a broad evaluation of the usability and user-friendliness of the toolbox, extension to more resources, broader adoption by different life-science communities, and a long-term vision for maintenance and sustainability.

 

Opinion: Why we’re becoming a Digital Public Good — and why we aren’t | Devex

“A few months ago, Medtronic LABS made the decision to open source our digital health platform SPICE, and pursue certification as a Digital Public Good. DPGs are defined by the Digital Public Good Alliance as: “Open-source software, open data, open AI models, open standards, and open content that adhere to privacy and other applicable laws and best practices, do no harm by design, and help attain the Sustainable Development Goals.” The growing momentum around DPGs in global health is relatively new, coinciding with the launch of the U.N. Secretary General’s Roadmap for Digital Cooperation in 2020. The movement aims to put governments in the driver’s seat, promote better collaboration among development partners, and reduce barriers to the digitization of health systems.”

Craft OA: EU-Projekt zur Förderung von Diamond Open Access (EU project to foster uptake of Diamond OA) | OPERAS-GER

engl. version via deepl.com

    OPERAS is a consortium partner of the EU project “Creating a Robust Accessible Federated Technology for Open Access”, short: CRAFT-OA, which started in January 2023. The project with a total of 23 partners in 14 European countries is funded by the European Commission for three years with 4.8 million euros. The project is led by the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen / Niedersächsische Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen (SUB Göttingen).

    CRAFT-OA aims to strengthen and further develop institutional publishing in the Diamond Open Access model throughout Europe. The Diamond Open Access model means that researchers do not have to pay for the publication of scientific publications and readers do not have to pay for access to them. The special feature of CRAFT-OA is its focus on journal publishing. For this purpose, services and tools are to be developed that will enable local and regional platforms and service providers to expand their content, services and also platforms and thus achieve stronger networking with other information systems in science. For scientists in the institutional Diamond Open Access area, this means easier work.

German original:

OPERAS ist Konsortiumspartner des im Januar 2023 gestarteten EU-Projekts „Creating a Robust Accessible Federated Technology for Open Access“, kurz: CRAFT-OA. Das Projekt mit insgesamt 23 Partnern in 14 europäischen Ländern wird von der Europäischen Kommission drei Jahre lang mit 4,8 Millionen Euro gefördert. Die Leitung liegt bei der Georg-August-Universität Göttingen / Niedersächsischen Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen (SUB Göttingen).

CRAFT-OA hat das Ziel, europaweit das institutionelle Publikationswesen im Diamond Open Access-Modell zu stärken und weiterzuentwickeln. Unter dem Diamond Open Access-Modell versteht man, dass sowohl die Forschenden für die Veröffentlichung von als auch die Lesenden für den Zugriff auf wissenschaftliche Publikationen keine Gebühren zahlen müssen. Das Besondere an CRAFT-OA ist hierbei die Spezialisierung auf das Journalpublizieren. Hierfür sollen Services und Werkzeuge entwickelt werden, die es lokalen und regionalen Plattformen und Serviceanbietern ermöglichen, ihre Inhalte, Services und auch Plattformen zu erweitern und somit eine stärkere Vernetzung mit anderen Informationssystemen in der Wissenschaft zu erreichen. Für Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler im institutionellen Diamond Open Access-Bereich bedeutet dies ein erleichtertes Arbeiten.

 

Funders Summit 2022: Key Lessons | Invest in Open Infrastructure | Jan 13, 2023

“…Throughout the event, we were very grateful to have Bianca Kramer, Katherine Skinner, and Elena Denaro acting as our “learning partners”. They observed and noted the dynamics and conversations as the event progressed. Below, we share our event reflections as an asynchronous discussion between Bianca, Katherine, and Emmy Tsang, IOI’s Engagement Lead.

Bright spots — There’s an appetite for new strategies for investing. Katherine: The positive tempo and tone and the deep participation by many of the attendees signal that there is a hunger for these discussions and that IOI is a team that can provide the grounding (research), the convening space, and the facilitation to help that process forward. The Summit provided building blocks for future conversations and actions. Katherine: This event helped establish shared knowledge and built some connections. It opened a vibrant space for discussion over what information, organized in what ways, might help to inform decision making around funding. Some sessions gave connection points between participants and interest in use cases. Can this initial energy be built upon so that it moves from passive interest to active opinions? What information and settings could enable this transition to happen, even for a handful of the participants?

Tensions — The need to define terms. Katherine: One of the consistent themes throughout the event was the marking of troublesome terms and ones that different participants may have been using differently from one another. Terms that arose included Open, Infrastructure, Governance, Community (along with Community-based, Community-led, Community-governed, and Community-owned), Data, Equitable, Diversity, Funders, Incentive. Values, Venture Capital, ROI, Transparency, Nonprofit/not-for-profit, Critical Infrastructure, etc. For the future, it might be helpful to pose the question “why do we need strong definitions in order to move forward and how do we build strong-enough definitions so that this isn’t a continued barrier?”. The sense of missing definitions stalls action – it also points to some sense of fear (of being misunderstood, of funding the wrong thing, of being led astray by data)….”

Twenty-Fifth Year Reflections on PKP – Public Knowledge Project

“In 1998, I initiated a project that set out to make research a greater part of what constituted public knowledge. I called it a Public Knowledge project. That is, before PKP was PKP, it was PKp. The initial project arose out of a modest gift to the University of British Columbia from Pacific Press, the company that owned Vancouver’s two newspapers, the Vancouver Sun and Province. On learning of this gift to UBC, where I served as a Faculty of Education professor, I proposed that this new Pacific Press Professorship explore how the internet, with all its early promise as an “information highway,” could increase public access to research and scholarship. This would complement the Pacific Press’ journalism, I suggested, as well as advance educational goals, by expanding the storehouse of public knowledge….”

 

 

A global force in scholarly publishing, the Public Knowledge Project announced as SFU core facility – Simon Fraser University

“Simon Fraser University has designated the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) the university’s newest core facility, with Kevin Stranack serving as its Operations Director as well as SFU Professor Juan Pablo Alperin and professor John Willinsky as its Co-Scientific Directors….

PKP is a multi-university initiative developing free open source software and conducting research to improve the quality and reach of scholarly publishing. Inclusion in SFU’s Core Facilities Program represents a recognition of PKP’s ongoing development as a vital open research infrastructure for digital-era scholarly publishing. Like the other core facilities, PKP is making its resources available to the university, as well as to the larger academic community outside of SFU, with its platforms being widely used by researchers and students across the campus and around the world….”

European Commission provides funding to improve Open Access publishing landscape

“From January 2023, the University of Coimbra will be involved in another Open Science project: the CRAFT-OA project (“Creating a Robust Accessible Federated Technology for Open Access”) involves 23 partners in 14 European countries and will last for 36 months. The project is funded under the Horizon Europe framework programme, aiming to evolve and strengthen the institutional publishing landscape of Diamond Open Access (Diamond OA): no fees for authors or readers.

By offering tangible services and tools for the entire journal publishing lifecycle, CRAFT-OA will empower local and regional platforms and service providers to extend, professionalise and achieve greater interoperability with other scientific information systems for content and platforms. These developments will help researchers and publishers involved in publishing.

The project focuses on four action strands to improve the Diamond OA model:

(1) Providing technical improvements for journal platforms and journal software.

(2) Building communities of practice to promote overall infrastructure improvement

(3) Increase the visibility, discoverability and recognition of Diamond OA publishing

(4) Integrate Diamond OA publishing with the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and other large-scale data aggregators….”

Giving students everywhere up-close access to a world of art – Harvard Gazette

“Since its inception, the database of cultural heritage images available for free online with IIIF capability has continued to grow. In 2022, the IIIF community estimated that between all their participating cultural heritage institutions, they’ve made available more than 1 billion items available.

“With IIIF, we’re investing in the cultural heritage image community,” Snydman said. “Our goal is global, universal, as open as possible. It’s not just about Harvard’s images; it’s about enabling students and faculty to interact in the very same way with images at Oxford, the Library of Congress, or the Vatican that they do with images held at Harvard. The code word for this is interoperability.”

Of the 1 billion IIIF-compatible items, about 6 million are held in Harvard’s library collections. Everything from 500-year-old maps to modern photographs are viewable in high resolution by anyone with an internet connection. Emily Dickinson’s pencil strokes can be magnified and examined, and Persian manuscripts like the one studied by Kim’s class can be compared with illustrations from the same region and period held at the Library of Congress….

“The fact that IIIF has been able to become a universal standard, and that it’s all open-source — that has exciting implications for democratized learning,” said Snydman. “Students and scholars of all ages have the opportunity to learn with images — not just in a physical classroom or library, not just during certain hours, and not just on Harvard’s campus. This is a great example of how technology can be used to minimize inequalities in education and give open access to knowledge.” …”

Economics and Equity in the Development of Open Research Europe – Munin conference presentation | Zenodo

“Open Research Europe (ORE) is the open access peer-reviewed publishing platform offered by the European Commission as an optional service to Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe beneficiaries at no cost to them. The platform enables researchers to publish open access without paying out of their research budgets and while complying with their open access obligations.

These are the outputs from an interactive session run by Rob Johnson at the 17th Munin Conference on 30 November 2022 to gather delegates’ feedback on the future operationalisation of Open Research Europe as a collective publishing enterprise.

These outputs supplement the following paper and report: …”

CDL job posting: Technical Team Manager – California Digital Library | January 4, 2023

“…The Technical Team Manager leads a development team responsible for the technical architecture, operations, and continued evolution of systems and services for the Publishing, Archives, and Digitization (PAD) program at the California Digital Library (CDL). Working closely with the group’s Director, Associate Director, and Senior Product Managers, the incumbent will help support vital and innovative services for the University of California community, including but not limited to: eScholarship, UC’s open access publishing and institutional repository platform; Calisphere, an open gateway of digitized primary source materials from cultural heritage institutions at UC and throughout California; and technical processes supporting CDL’s coordination of UC’s participation in HathiTrust.  The incumbent will also work with other technical leaders at CDL to provide cross-organizational technical strategic guidance, planning, and decision making, and will collaborate with staff from other organizations with whom CDL partners. 

The Technical Team Manager will actively manage a team of developers to ensure that systems provided by the group are reliable, robust, and efficient; effectively meet service goals and the needs of end users; and conform to relevant domain and development best practices and standards.  The incumbent will also be responsible for assigning projects, tasks, and other responsibilities to direct reports, as well as supporting their ongoing professional growth….”