Project Jasper: the story so far – DOAJ News Service

“The initiative was launched by DOAJ, CLOCKSS, Internet Archive, Keepers Registry and Public Knowledge Project to start addressing the problem of open access journals disappearing from the web. We thought it was time for another update on what has been going on behind the scenes over the last few months.

Initially a scoping exercise, Phase One has subsequently seen the project partners design, implement and test a process for workflow efficiencies, capacity and usability. Articles from a number of journals have been ingested and documentation has been updated. Along the way, knowledge has been gained and valuable lessons have been learned 

The lessons relate to this project and preservation, but some may also apply to other publishing-related needs that smaller journals find challenging so we thought it would be useful to record our learnings and share them….”

Music Library Association Opens Publications at Internet Archive – Internet Archive Blogs

“For librarians who specialize in caring for music collections, it can be challenging to keep up with the latest technology and resources in the profession. The Music Library Association recently helped address this problem by making many of its publications openly available online.

The MLA donated 21 of its monographs to the Internet Archive for digitization and worked with authors to make the material free to the public under Creative Commons licenses. 

The new collection of backlist titles includes information on careers in music librarianship and history of the field. It also covers planning and building music library collections, which can be complicated and involve individual creators and small publishers, said Kathleen DeLaurenti, who helped lead the partnership with the Internet Archive in her role as MLA’s first open access editor. There are also valuable materials on music library approaches to technical services—everything from how to preserve music materials to how to bind and catalog them….”

Helping Ukrainian Scholars, One Book at a Time – Internet Archive Blogs

“The Internet Archive is proud to partner with Better World Books to support Ukrainian students and scholars. With a $1 donation at checkout during your purchase at betterworldbooks.com, you will help provide verifiable information to Ukrainian scholars all over the world through Wikipedia.

Since 2019, the Internet Archive has worked with the Wikipedia community to strengthen citations to published literature. Working in collaboration with Wikipedians and data scientists, Internet Archive has linked hundreds of thousands of citations in Wikipedia to books in our collection, offering Wikipedia editors and readers single-click access to the verifiable facts contained within libraries. 

Recently, our engineers analyzed the citations in the Ukrainian-language Wikipedia, and were able to connect citations to more than 17,000 books that have already been digitized by the Internet Archive, such as the page for ???????? (English translation: Genomics), which links to a science textbook published in 2002. Through this work, we discovered that there are more than 25,000 additional books that we don’t have in our collection—and that’s where you can help! …”

Library as Laboratory: Analyzing Biodiversity Literature at Scale

“Imagine the great library of life, the library that Charles Darwin said was necessary for the “cultivation of natural science” (1847). And imagine that this library is not just hundreds of thousands of books printed from 1500 to the present, but also the data contained in those books that represents all that we know about life on our planet. That library is the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) The Internet Archive has provided an invaluable platform for the BHL to liberate taxonomic names, species descriptions, habitat description and much more. Connecting and harnessing the disparate data from over five-centuries is now BHL’s grand challenge. The unstructured textual data generated at the point of digitization holds immense untapped potential. Tim Berners-Lee provided the world with a semantic roadmap to address this global deluge of dark data and Wikidata is now executing on his vision. As we speak, BHL’s data is undergoing rapid transformation from legacy formats into linked open data, fulfilling the promise to evaporate data silos and foster bioliteracy for all humankind….”

How the Wayback Machine Is Saving Digital Ukraine – IEEE Spectrum

“When the Ukrainian invasion began, the Internet Archive launched several efforts to capture the Ukrainian Internet. Its archivists launched a high-volume crawl through hundreds of thousands of websites ending in “.ua.” They selected specific sites to archive as completely as possible, including government, education, and library sites. And they targeted journalism, particularly Ukrainian news sites and aggregators. The organization has also been supporting others working to save Ukraine’s digital resources, including SUCHO (Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online) and the Archive Team.

Mark Graham, director of the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, explained this dive into Ukraine’s Internet and how it differs from the Wayback Machine’s usual approach to preserving digital history. …”

New Project Will Unlock Access to Government Publications on Microfiche – Internet Archive Blogs

“Government documents from microfiche are coming to archive.org based on the combined efforts of the Internet Archive, Stanford University Libraries, and other library partners. The resulting files will be available for free public access to enable new analysis and access techniques. 

Microfiche cards, which contain miniaturized thumbnails of the publication’s pages, are starting to be digitized and matched to catalog records by the Internet Archive. Once in a digital format and preserved on archive.org, these documents will be searchable and downloadable by anyone with an Internet connection, since U.S. government publications are in the public domain….

The collection includes reports from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), NASA, the Department of Interior, and other government agencies from the 1970s to the present. There are also transcripts of congressional hearings and other Congressional material that contain discussion of potential laws or issues of concern to the public, Jacobs said….

Microfiche is not a format that can be easily read without using a machine in a library building. Many members of the public are not aware of the material available on microfiche so the potential for finding and using them is heightened once these documents are digitized. And as the information is shared with other federal depository libraries, there will be a ripple effect for researchers, academics, students, and the general public in gaining access….”

Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online (SUCHO) | SUCHO

“We are a group of cultural heritage professionals – librarians, archivists, researchers, programmers – working together to identify and archive at-risk sites, digital content, and data in Ukrainian cultural heritage institutions while the country is under attack. We are using a combination of technologies to crawl and archive sites and content, including the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, the Browsertrix crawler and the ArchiveWeb.page browser extension and app of the Webrecorder project. …”

Independent Publisher Drives Innovation, Sells eBooks to Internet Archive – Internet Archive Blogs

“The goal of 11:11 Press is to have its books in every library in the world, according to its founder and publisher, Andrew Wilt.

“We are big supporters of libraries because they allow equal access to knowledge and preserve culture,” said Wilt, whose independent press based in Minneapolis sells its books at a discount to nonprofits. “From a publishing standpoint, our authors care about being read so we want to get our books to as many people as possible.”

 

The Internet Archive recently bought the entire catalog of books from 11:11 Press and made them available online for controlled digital lending to one person at a time.  …”

Inside a former S.F. church, a battle for the future of knowledge | Datebook

“But Kahle is in trouble. If a lawsuit filed by publishers Penguin Random House, Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins and Wiley succeeds, he will have to not only shut the archive down, but also fork over about $60 million.

The lawsuit aims to stop the longstanding and widespread library practice of Controlled Digital Lending, which would stop the hundreds of libraries using that system, including the Internet Archive, from providing their patrons with digital books. …”

Penguin Random House Demands Removal Of Maus From Digital Library Because The Book Is Popular Again

“We’ve said it over and over again, if libraries did not exist today, there is no way publishers would allow them to come into existence. We know this, in part, because of their attempts to stop libraries from lending ebooks, and to price ebooks at ridiculous markups to discourage libraries, and their outright claims that libraries are unfair competition. And we won’t even touch on their lawsuit over digital libraries.

Anyway, in other book news, you may have heard recently about how a Tennessee school board banned Art Spiegelman’s classic graphic novel about the Holocaust, Maus, from being taught in an eighth-grade English class. Some people called this a ban, while others said the book is still available, so it’s not a “ban.” To me, I think school boards are not the teachers, and the teachers should be able to come up with their own curriculum, as they know best what will educate their students. Also, Maus is a fantastic book, and the claim that it was banned because of “rough, objectionable language” and nudity is utter nonsense.

Either way, Maus is now back atop various best seller lists, as the controversy has driven sales. Spiegelman is giving fun interviews again where he says things like “well, who’s the snowflake now?” And we see op-eds about how the best way get kids not to read books… is to assign it in English class.

But, also, we have publishers getting into the banning business themselves… by trying to capitalize on the sudden new interest in Maus.

Penguin Random House doesn’t want this new interest in Maus to lead to… people taking it out of the library rather than buying a copy. They’re now abusing copyright law to demand the book be removed from the Internet Archive’s lending library, and they flat out admit that they’re doing so for their own bottom line….”

Librarian’s lament: Digital books are not fireproof | ZDNet

“We are the library of last resort, where anyone can get access to books that may be controversial wherever they happen to live — an existing version of Perlow’s proposed “Freedom Archive.” Today, the Internet Archive lends a large selection of other banned books, including Animal Farm, Winnie the Pooh, The Call of the Wild, and the Junie B. Jones and Goosebumps children’s book series. But all of these books are also in danger of being destroyed.

In the summer of 2020, four of the largest publishers in the U.S. — Penguin Random House among them — sued to force our library to destroy the more than 1.4 million digital books in our collection. In their pending lawsuit, the publishers are using copyright law as a battering ram to assert corporate control over the public good. In this instance, that means destroying freely available books and other materials that people rely on to become productive and discerning participants in the country’s civic, economic, and social life. 

Copyright law grants authors and publishers a limited monopoly over the books they produce. The law also enshrines a host of socially beneficial uses the public may make of those books without permission or payment. The famously flexible fair use doctrine has allowed libraries to continue serving the public in the face of rapid technological and social change. 

If ever there was a moment of compelling “socially beneficial” access to books, it came in March 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic shut down in-person library use almost everywhere. In response to the unprecedented crisis, more than 100 libraries holding critical books they could not lend signed a statement supporting the Internet Archive’s establishment of a temporary National Emergency Library. The NEL allowed patrons controlled digital access to those collections that were locked away physically. It was a lifeline to trusted information for parents, teachers, and students around the world.

Yet, in an extreme overreaction to the facts, the publishers sued in June 2020 to shutter the NEL, along with our book lending practice as a whole. And in addition to demanding millions of dollars in monetary damages and fees, the lawsuit is calling on the Internet Archive to destroy all the digital books in our collections. It’s a digital book burning on a massive scale….”

Fahrenheit 2020: Torching the Internet’s Library of Alexandria at the Height of a Global Pandemic Notes 2021 University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy 2021

“The Internet’s Library of Alexandria [namely, the Internet Archive] faces the threat of a weapon that would be altogether foreign to the knowledge stewards of antiquity: copyright law. A group of publishers, despite years of discontent and cries of illegality regarding IA’s program of virtually lending in-copyright books, decided that the height of a global pandemic was the perfect time to wield their legal weapon. To be sure, IA had been lending its books in this manner long before COVID19 became a household word.” It does so through a controversial, legally untested concept known as “controlled digital lending” (CDL), which rests on a novel legal theory that libraries should be allowed to scan and virtually lend over the internet their lawfully acquired physical books, to one patron at a time, without any special licenses.’  Though a small but persistent chorus of dissenters have bemoaned this practice over the decade-plus that libraries have increasingly experimented with it, it was not until the onslaught of the coronavirus pandemic did CDL finally reach the courts….”

Concordia archivists move digital publications collection to a new location

“The final steps of the project took all summer, but the historical archives team at Concordia’s Records Management and Archives (RMA) has officially moved its publications collection to the Internet Archive. The new location is much more sortable and searchable than the RMA general website.

“Having these publications on Internet Archive allows RMA to provide new and reliable ways to conduct in-text searching, browsing and sorting of material,” explains digital archivist John Richan.

The collection dates back to 1926 and includes long-running publications such as The Loyola News (1938-1969), The Georgian (1936-1970) and The Thursday Report (1977-2005).

The digitization of Concordia’s old and fragile publications began in 2014 and continues today. This recent migration project of more than 2,100 issues wrapped up in November after a long and detailed process that included the verification of content and metadata, filling in a number of missing issues, migrating preservation copies into digital preservation storage and finally uploading copies to Internet Archive….”

Boston Phoenix Rises Again With New Online Access – Internet Archive Blogs

“After the publication shut down, owner Stephen Mindich wanted the public to be able to access back issues of the Phoenix. The complete run of the newspaper from 1973 to 2013 was donated to Northeastern University’s special collections. The family signed copyright over the university. 

Librarians led a crowdsourcing project to create a digital index of all the articles and authors, which was helpful for historians and others in their research, said Giordana Mecagni, head of special collections and university archivist. Northeastern had inquired about digitizing the collection, but it was cost prohibitive. 

As it turns out, the Internet Archive owned the master microfilm for the Phoenix and it put the full collection online in a separate collection: The Boston Phoenix 1973-2013. Initially, the back issues were only available for one patron to check out at a time through Controlled Digital Lending. Once Northeastern learned about the digitized collection, it extended rights to the Archive to allow the Phoenix to be downloaded without controls….”