ACS Publications announces open access initiative for primarily undergraduate institutions – American Chemical Society

“The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is pleased to announce that it is sponsoring open access publication for corresponding authors at qualifying primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). “Overnight, this program makes it possible for researchers at 114 institutions to publish their work in ACS journals, open access, at no additional cost to the researcher or the library,” says James Baldini, vice president of global sales, business operations and analytics at ACS Publications. “We are excited to generate awareness of this program so that authors at PUIs can immediately begin enjoying the benefits of sponsored open publication with ACS.” …

The program is available to any PUI that doesn’t offer graduate degrees in the sciences and that subscribes to the journal section of the ACS All Publications Package. This offer lasts the duration of the institution’s subscription, with no limit on the number of research articles that can be published open access during that time. Corresponding authors can opt in to open access when they sign their publishing agreement with ACS. Should each enrolled institution publish a modest number of articles as a result of this program, it will represent in excess of $1 million in ACS open access content….”

ACS inks ‘read and publish’ agreements with German consortia – American Chemical Society

“The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) proudly announces two new “read and publish” agreements with the Helmholtz and Niedersachsen consortia in Germany, effective January 2023. The agreements — ACS Publications’ first transformative agreements with German consortia in almost three years — offer researchers at 24 German institutions the opportunity to publish open research with one of the world’s most trusted publishers at no cost to the researcher, while also meeting funder requirements for open access. ACS invites researchers in this community to take full advantage of this agreement by submitting their next paper to the ACS journal of their choice. …”

Open and reusable annotated mass spectrometry dataset of a chemodiverse collection of 1,600 plant extracts | GigaScience | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  As privileged structures, natural products often display potent biological activities. However, the discovery of novel bioactive scaffolds is often hampered by the chemical complexity of the biological matrices they are found in. Large natural extract collections are thus extremely valuable for their chemical novelty potential but also complicated to exploit in the frame of drug-discovery projects. In the end, it is the pure chemical substances that are desired for structural determination purposes and bioactivity evaluation. Researchers interested in the exploration of large and chemodiverse extract collections should thus establish strategies aiming to efficiently tackle such chemical complexity and access these structures. Establishing carefully crafted digital layers documenting the spectral and chemical complexity as well as bioactivity results of natural extracts collections can help prioritize time-consuming but mandatory isolation efforts. In this note, we report the results of our initial exploration of a collection of 1,600 plant extracts in the frame of a drug-discovery effort. After describing the taxonomic coverage of this collection, we present the results of its liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometric profiling and the exploitation of these profiles using computational solutions. The resulting annotated mass spectral dataset and associated chemical and taxonomic metadata are made available to the community, and data reuse cases are proposed. We are currently continuing our exploration of this plant extract collection for drug-discovery purposes (notably looking for novel antitrypanosomatids, anti-infective and prometabolic compounds) and ecometabolomics insights. We believe that such a dataset can be exploited and reused by researchers interested in computational natural products exploration.

 

Swiss Chemical Society – Chemistry Europe Societies are Fully Committed to Open Access Publishing

“In May 2022, representatives of the 16 chemical societies of Chemistry Europe made a bold statement as they elected ChemElectroChem to be the first title in their portfolio of 19 journals to transition from a reader-pays subscription model to an author-pays open access model.

Chemistry Europe is no stranger to open access publishing. Since launching the first fully open access, societyowned journal, ChemistryOpen, which published its first volume in 2012, Chemistry Europe has expanded theirportfolio to include Analytical Science Advances and Electrochemical Science Advances and launched Chemistry–Methods in 2021. In addition, Chemistry Europe recently announced it is launching a new gold open access journal, aptly called ChemistryEurope. The namesake fully open access journal will launch in 2023 and aims torepresent the core values of the association by publishing high-quality and high-impact articles across all areas of chemistry….”

The Royal Society of Chemistry joins Jisc’s Publications Router service – Research

“The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), a global publisher in chemical sciences and related fields, is now supplying full-text journal articles to Jisc’s Publications Router, which automatically delivers them into the open repositories of the UK institutions to which the authors are affiliated….”

Access to chemical database Reaxys under threat in UK as fees spiral | Chemistry World

Concerns have been raised that institutional access to the Reaxys chemical and reactions database could end at universities across the UK in a row over rising costs. The dispute over subscription fees is being described as a potentially significant problem for chemists in the UK, and maybe worldwide.

Reaxys incorporates Beilstein – the largest organic chemistry database – and Gmelin – a sizeable repository of organometallic and inorganic compounds and databases, as well as other key chemistry resources. Launched in 2009 and licensed by commercial publishing giant Elsevier, Reaxys enables research chemists to search and find chemical compounds, reactions, properties and synthesis planning information. It also includes chemical patent literature.

The Joint Information Systems Committee (Jisc), an organisation that assists UK universities with digital resources and negotiates on behalf of the UK higher education and research sector, is currently in talks with Elsevier to make institutional access to Reaxys more affordable.

[…]

 

Scientific Openness and Integrity: Two Decades of Interactive Open Access Publishing and Open Peer Review

“For more than 20 years, the scientific journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) has been a pioneer in open access publishing and public peer review with interactive discussion. All articles published in it are accessible free of charge via the internet. By recording and opening up the peer review process, the interactive open access journals lead to an internet of knowledge or epistemic web that does not only reflect what we know but also how we know it, i.e., how well it has been validated.

The achievements of ACP and further interactive open access sister journals of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) will be celebrated, reflected, and further developed at a special meeting of the ACP editorial board and the EGU publications committee on 19 September 2022 at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (MPIC) in Mainz. The meeting is supported by the open access publisher Copernicus, which operates the journal on behalf of EGU in a not-for-profit manner.

Ensure free speech, critical discussion, and transparency in scientific communication and quality assurance

Since the journal launch in 2001, ACP has grown to become one of the major international journals in atmospheric science, now handling around a thousand submissions per year. ACP’s success was not assured when it launched. Open peer review, in which the reviewer comments, author replies, and additional public comments from the scientific community are published immediately, was radical in 2001. “Our guiding principle was to achieve highest levels of scientific integrity through free speech and transparency in scientific exchange and quality assurance”, says Max Planck Director Ulrich Pöschl, who had initiated ACP.

The interactive open access publishing concept was developed more than 20 years ago by researchers connected through the MPI for Chemistry. “It has been a lot of joy and work to initiate, design, and establish interactive open-access publishing with an equally pleasant and strong team of friends and colleagues, including Paul Crutzen and Arne Richter, who are unfortunately not with us anymore but deserve special thanks for the swift initial gain of momentum”, says Uli Pöschl, who led ACP until recently, chaired the EGU publications committee for many years, and continues to promote open access also through the global initiative OA2020 and related activities.”

Preprints in Chemistry: a Research Team’s Journey** – Ciriminna – ChemistryOpen – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  The benefits of publishing research papers first in preprint form are substantial and long-lasting also in chemistry. Recounting the outcomes of our team’s nearly six-year journey through preprint publishing, we show evidence that preprinting research substantially benefits both early career and senior researchers in today’s highly interdisciplinary chemical research. These findings are of general value, as shown by analyzing the case of four more research teams based in economically developed and developing countries.

 

Five Years of ChemRxiv: Where We Are and Where We Go From Here | Chemical Education | ChemRxiv | Cambridge Open Engage

“ChemRxiv was launched on August 15, 2017 to provide researchers in chemistry and related fields a home for the immediate sharing of their latest research. In the past five years, ChemRxiv has grown into the premier preprint server for the chemical sciences, with a global audience and a wide array of scholarly content that helps advance science more rapidly. On the service’s fifth anniversary, we would like to reflect on the past five years and take a look at what is next for ChemRxiv.”

Best-selling chemistry textbook is now free | News | Chemistry World

“The author of a popular organic chemistry textbook is making it freely available to students after learning about a loophole in his copyright agreement with the publisher.

John McMurry’s Organic Chemistry has been one of the best selling chemistry textbooks since it was first printed in 1984. Under his agreement with Cengage Learning, the book’s publisher, McMurry realised he could ask for the book’s copyright to be returned to him 30 years after it was first printed. Without copyright of the first edition, the publisher is unable to produce any more new editions, McMurry notes.

McMurry, an emeritus professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Cornell University, US, says the move was a tribute to his son who passed away from cystic fibrosis three years ago….”

‘The entire protein universe’: AI predicts shape of nearly every known protein

“From today, determining the 3D shape of almost any protein known to science will be as simple as typing in a Google search.

Researchers have used AlphaFold — the revolutionary artificial-intelligence (AI) network — to predict the structures of some 200 million proteins from 1 million species, covering nearly every known protein on the planet.

The data dump will be freely available on a database set up by DeepMind, Google’s London-based AI company that developed AlphaFold, and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), an intergovernmental organization near Cambridge, UK….”

AlphaFold reveals the structure of the protein universe

“It’s been one year since we released and open sourced AlphaFold and created the AlphaFold Protein Structure Database (AlphaFold DB) to freely share this scientific knowledge with the world. Proteins are the building blocks of life, they underpin every biological process in every living thing. And, because a protein’s shape is closely linked with its function, knowing a protein’s structure unlocks a greater understanding of what it does and how it works. We hoped this groundbreaking resource would help accelerate scientific research and discovery globally, and that other teams could learn from and build on the advances we made with AlphaFold to create further breakthroughs. That hope has become a reality far quicker than we had dared to dream. Just twelve months later, AlphaFold has been accessed by more than half a million researchers and used to accelerate progress on important real-world problems ranging from plastic pollution to antibiotic resistance.

Today, I’m incredibly excited to share the next stage of this journey. In partnership with EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), we’re now releasing predicted structures for nearly all catalogued proteins known to science, which will expand the AlphaFold DB by over 200x – from nearly 1 million structures to over 200 million structures – with the potential to dramatically increase our understanding of biology….

All 200+ million structures will also be available for bulk download via Google Cloud Public Datasets, making AlphaFold even more accessible to scientists around the world….”

 

ResearchGate Newsroom | Thieme and ResearchGate launch content syndication partnership

“Thieme and ResearchGate have begun a collaboration to increase the visibility of scientific content. With over 20 million members, ResearchGate provides a platform for researchers to share and discover research, build their networks, and advance their careers. The collaboration will enable direct access on ResearchGate to all scientific articles in the 50 open access journals published by Thieme, whose mission is to improve health and healthcare by providing the key information at the right time and in the right place….”

Early firm engagement, government research funding, and the privatization of public knowledge | SpringerLink

Abstract:  Early firm engagement in the scientific discovery process in public institutions is an important form of science-based innovation. However, early firm engagement may negatively affect the academic value of public papers due to firms’ impulse to privatize public knowledge. In this paper, we crawl all patent and paper text data of the Distinguished Young Scholars of the National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the chemical and pharmaceutical field. We use semantic recognition techniques to establish the link between scientific discovery papers and patented technologies to explore the relationship between the quality of public knowledge production, government research funding, and early firm engagement in the science-based innovation process. The empirical results show that, first, there is a relatively smooth inverted U-shaped relationship between government research funding for scholars and the quality of their publications. An initial increase in government research funding positively drives the quality of public knowledge production, but the effect turns negative when research funding is excessive. Second, government research funding for scholars can act as a value signal, triggering the firm’s impulse to privatize high-value scientific discoveries. Hence, early firm engagement moderates the inverted U-shaped relationship such that at low levels of research funding, early firm engagement can improve the quality of public knowledge production, and at high levels of research funding, early firm engagement can further reduce the quality of public knowledge production.