Jisc negotiates transformative agreement with the National Academy of Sciences | Jisc

“Jisc and the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (NAS) are pleased to announce a two-year transformational open access (OA) pilot agreement.

The ‘Publish and Read’ deal will allow UK corresponding authors at participating institutions to publish OA articles in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) without incurring any publication charges. Researchers at participating Jisc institutions will be able to access all PNAS content, dating back to 1915, for free….”

Data in Motion: New Approaches to Advancing Scientific, Engineering and Medical Progress: Proceedings of a Workshop–in Brief | The National Academies Press

Abstract:  The movement toward open science, data sharing, and increased transparency is being propelled by the need to rapidly address critical scientific challenges, such as the global COVID-19 public health crisis. This movement has supported growth in fields, such as artificial intelligence (AI), which has demonstrated potential to accelerate science, engineering, and medicine in new and exciting ways. To further advance innovation around these new approaches, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Research Data and Information convened a public virtual workshop on October 14-15, 2020, to address how researchers in different domains are utilizing data that undergo repeated processing, often in real-time, to accelerate scientific discovery. Although these topics were not originally part of the workshop, the impact of COVID-19 prompted the planning committee to add sessions on early career researchers’ perspectives, as well as rapid review and publishing activities as a result of the pandemic. Participants also explored the advances needed to enable future progress in areas such as AI, cyberinfrastructure, standards, and policies. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

 

PNAS Announces PNAS Nexus

“The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is pleased to announce the launch of PNAS Nexus, a highly selective, open access journal with a focus on innovation and rapid publication. PNAS Nexus will publish innovative and multi-, trans-, and interdisciplinary work across the biological, physical, and social sciences, particularly encompassing engineering and health sciences. The journal will be published under the leadership of Editor-in-Chief Karen Nelson, president of the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), and in partnership with Oxford University Press (OUP)….

In late summer 2021, PNAS Nexus will begin considering new submissions along with manuscripts rejected after review from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)—the flagship journal of the NAS—that authors wish to transfer. PNAS Nexus will publish its first issue in early 2022….”

Developing a Toolkit for Fostering Open Science Practices A Workshop | National Academies

“A virtual public workshop on developing a toolkit for fostering open science practices will take place on Thursday, November 5, 2020 in conjunction with the Fall 2020 meeting of the Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science. Additional information will be available in the coming weeks.

A committee will organize a public workshop to discuss the information and resource needs of researchers, research institutions, research funders, professional societies, and other stakeholders interested in fostering open science practices. Workshop participants will also discuss approaches to meeting those needs, such as development of a toolkit that could be used by various groups of stakeholders. The workshop will be held in conjunction with the Fall 2020 meeting of the Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science. The workshop will include presentations of commissioned papers that describe and provide examples of possible elements of a toolkit, a discussion of how available information resources are currently being used, additional resources that could be developed, and future use scenarios aimed at achieving closer alignment across research values, practices, and incentives related to open science. The workshop discussion will also explore possible mechanisms for disseminating a toolkit and other information resources. A Proceedings of a Workshop summarizing the discussion and including the individually-authored papers will be prepared by a designated rapporteur and distributed broadly….”

Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science | National Academies

“In order to increase the contribution of Open Science to producing better science, the Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science will convene critical stakeholders from universities, funding agencies, societies, foundations, and industry to discuss the effectiveness of current incentives for adopting Open Science practices, current barriers and disincentives of all types, and ways to move forward to align incentives that support common missions and values and mitigate disincentives. The Roundtable will convene two times per year and create a venue for exchange of ideas and a mechanism for joint strategic planning among key stakeholders. All activities of the Roundtable will be conducted in accordance with institutional guidelines described in “Roundtables: Policy and Procedures.” …”

Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science | National Academies

“In order to increase the contribution of Open Science to producing better science, the Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science will convene critical stakeholders from universities, funding agencies, societies, foundations, and industry to discuss the effectiveness of current incentives for adopting Open Science practices, current barriers and disincentives of all types, and ways to move forward to align incentives that support common missions and values and mitigate disincentives. The Roundtable will convene two times per year and create a venue for exchange of ideas and a mechanism for joint strategic planning among key stakeholders. All activities of the Roundtable will be conducted in accordance with institutional guidelines described in “Roundtables: Policy and Procedures.” …”

Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Challenges and a Way Forward – A Workshop : Health and Medicine Division

“An ad hoc planning committee under the auspices of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, will plan and conduct a two-day public workshop to discuss advances, challenges, and opportunities in clinical trial data sharing efforts since the release of the 2015 Institute of Medicine report, Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Maximizing Benefits, Minimizing Risk. This workshop is co-sponsored by the Wellcome Trust.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:

Consider the value and potential risks/costs of sharing clinical trial data for key stakeholders, including clinical trialists, sponsors, primary and secondary researchers, and patients;
Review the current landscape of clinical trial data sharing and reuse across public and private sectors (e.g. policies, platforms, collaborations, data sharing culture, published research output);
Examine use cases and trends from across public and private sectors when it comes to success, failure, lessons learned, and value;
Consider the perspectives and expectations of primary and secondary researchers, clinical trial participants, patient organizations, research sponsors (pharmaceutical companies and nonprofit organizations), journals, institutions, and federal agencies; and
Discuss next step opportunities for stakeholders to better harmonize incentives, policy, data standards, and governance to encourage the sharing and reuse of clinical trial data.

The planning committee will organize the workshop, develop the agenda, select and invite speakers and discussants, and moderate or identify moderators for the discussions. A proceedings of the presentations and discussions at the workshop will be prepared by a designated rapporteur in accordance with institutional guidelines….”

Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science

“In order to increase the contribution of open science to producing better science, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science convenes critical stakeholders to discuss the effectiveness of current incentives for adopting open science practices, current barriers of all types, and ways to move forward in order to align reward structures and institutional values. The Roundtable convenes two times per year and creates a venue for the exchange of ideas and joint strategic planning among key stakeholders. Each Roundtable meeting has a theme. The diverse themes target slightly different audiences but the core audience will consist of universities, government agencies, foundations, and other groups doing work related to open science. The Roundtable aims to improve coordination among stakeholders and increase awareness of current and future efforts in the broader open science community. The Roundtable will also convene one symposium per year, which may produce National Academies proceedings in brief….”

Enhancing Scientific Reproducibility through Transparent Reporting – A Workshop : Health and Medicine Division

“An ad hoc committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is convening a public workshop to discuss the current state of transparency in reporting pre-clinical biomedical research (e.g., disclosure of the availability and location of data, materials, analysis, and methodology) and to explore the possibility of improving the harmonization of guidelines across journals and funding agencies so that biomedical researchers propose and report data in a consistent manner. This workshop is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, Cell Press, The Lancet, and Nature Research.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:

Highlight current efforts by researchers, institutions, funders, and journals to increase transparency in proposing and reporting pre-clinical biomedical research;
Discuss journal and funder assessments of researchers’ adherence to reporting guidelines, including a discussion of the effectiveness of checklists;
Consider lessons learned from field-specific best practices for increased transparency in reporting rigor elements (i.e., research design, methodology, analysis, interpretation and reporting of results) that are generalizable across biomedical research domains;
Discuss opportunities for improving the consistency of reporting guidelines and requirements for rigor and transparency by journals, funders, and institutions across the biomedical research lifecycle; and
Consider approaches to compare reporting of rigor elements proposed in grant applications to those included in publications.

The committee will plan and organize the workshop, develop the agenda, select and invite speakers and discussants, and moderate or identify moderators for the discussions. The agenda will include a panel discussion on facilitating the development of consistent guidelines (e.g. a common set of minimal reporting standards) that could be applied across journals and funders to increase transparency in proposing and reporting biomedical research.

A proceedings of the presentations and discussions at the workshop will be prepared by a designated rapporteur in accordance with institutional guidelines….”

July 6, 2015: Marcia K. McNutt Nominated to be Next NAS President

“The Council of the National Academy of Sciences has approved the nomination of Marcia K. McNutt, editor-in-chief of the Science family of journals, for election as president of the Academy, to succeed Ralph J. Cicerone when his second term as NAS president ends on July 1, 2016….As editor-in-chief she led the effort to establish Science Advances, an open access, online-only offspring of Science….”