Open Science Pathways in the Earth, Space, and Life Sciences – A joint event co-organized by SciLifeLab and the AGU | AGU Data Leadership

“SciLifeLab Data Centre and the American Geophysical Union (AGU) invite you to a half-day event on 2022 May 9 focusing on the following Open Science themes:

The Path to Open, Reproducible Science – Stories from the Research Community
How to Open Science – Practical Use Cases, Lessons Learned from the Research Community
Open Science from a Broader Context – What Open Science Means from the National and International Perspectives

The event will feature a number of speakers (listed below) all addressing these themes on Open Science from various perspectives. The online event will start at 12:00 and end at 17:00 CEST (See date/time in your time zone). Please join us. Registration is free. Please join us and we look forward to seeing you….”

Asclepias: Citing Software, Making Science

“The Asclepias Project builds networks of citations between the astronomical academic literature and software, helping you find the tools to push your research forward….

The Asclepias Project is a joint effort of the American Astronomical Society, the NASA Astrophysics Data System, Zenodo, and Sidrat Research, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.”

Astronomy community shapes their own destiny with Astropy · GitHub

“Open source software provides the backbone for astronomical science. The Python ecosystem is particularly important to astronomers, who rely heavily on mathematical packages like NumPy and matplotlib for their work. Perhaps the most central tool in the modern astronomer’s workflow is Astropy, a collection of specialized Python tools built and maintained by and for the astronomical community. More than 400 people have contributed to Astropy, including astronomers and other scientists, software engineers, and infrastructure specialists….”

Planetary Data System: Information for Data Proposers

“In response to a 2013 federal mandate the NASA Plan for Increasing Access to the Results of Scientific Research was developed to guide the management of and access to research data and peer-reviewed publications. Accordingly, the NASA Guidebook for Proposers describes the requirement that all proposals submitted under a NASA funding opportunity are required to submit a Data Management Plan. This website contains information and links that NASA’s Planetary Data System (PDS) believes will be helpful in preparing your proposal and your Data Management Plan, or simply as you develop a plan for archiving your data even if not as part of a funded proposal. If you have additional questions contact either the PDS or the relevant NASA Program Officer.

The intent of this website is to provide potential data providers with an overview of the appropriateness of the PDS as an archive for their data, the procedure for requesting letters of support for grant proposals, and the steps that a data provider would take in the generation of a PDS-compliant archive….”

Last updated October 2021.

NASA Open Source Science Workshop

“Last week NASA led an Open Source Science for Data Processing and Archives Workshop, announcing new initiatives to support open science. This was very exciting to be a part of — we learned about NASA’s continuing leadership in open science and presented some of our work with Openscapes. This is a brief summary, and will be updated with links to slides and recordings….”

Science Mesh in Social Media Analytics and Astronomy – Collaborative Documents and On-Demand data transfers | CS3MESH4EOSC

“The second CS3MESH4EOSC webinar, entitled “Science Mesh in Social Media Analytics and Astronomy – Collaborative Documents and On-Demand data transfers” is going to take place on 17th November from 1:00 pm-2:00 pm CEST. 

The webinar will be focused on the two data services (On-Demand Data Transfer and Collaborative Documents) and the related Use-Cases (LOFAR and RiseSMA).

The speakers will highlight how the Science Mesh is integrating both data services into the federated Science Mesh across disciplines. Exemplary benefits of this integration in Social Media Analytics and Crisis Communication (RiseSMA) and Astronomy (LOFAR – Low-Frequency Array), fields will be presented by real use cases that are already getting benefits from the Science Mesh’s features….”

Transform to Open Science (TOPS) | Science Mission Directorate

“From 2022 to 2027, TOPS will accelerate the engagement of the scientific community in open science practices through events and activities aimed at:

Lowering barriers to entry for historically excluded communities
Better understanding how people use NASA data and code to take advantage of our big data collections
Increasing opportunities for collaboration while promoting scientific innovation, transparency, and reproducibility….”

Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A)

“The A&A Board of Directors has announced that their journal will move to a Subscribe-to-Open (S2O) model. If libraries renew their subscriptions, A&A will be published in full open access in 2022. Since its launch in 1969, A&A has been publishing pioneering, peer reviewed scientific content. The transition to open access will extend access of its high-quality research to a worldwide audience – furthering the field of astronomy and astrophysics. Library subscriptions, together with substantial contributions from the A&A sponsoring countries, will cover publication and editorial costs and enable content to become open access….”

The AAS goes for Gold | Published by The Open Journal of Astrophysics

“Yesterday there was a big announcement from the American Astronomical Society (AAS) , namely that all its journals will switch to Open Access from 1st January 2022. This transition will affect the Astronomical Journal (AJ), the Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL), and the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS). Previously authors were able to opt for Open Access but from next year it will apply to all papers.

The positive aspect to this change is that it makes articles published by the AAS freely available to the public and other scientists without requiring the payment of a subscription.

On the other hand, these journals will require authors to pay a hefty sum, equivalent to an Article Processing Charge (APC), that increases with the length and complexity of a paper. AAS journals have in the past levied “page charges” from authors for standard (non-OA) publications. In the new regime these are merged into a unified scheme….

What’s on offer is therefore a form of Gold Open Access that switches the cost of publication from subscribers to authors. In my view this level of APC is excessive, which is why I call this Fool’s Gold Open Access. Although the AAS is a not-for-profit organization, its journals are published by the Institute of Physics Publishing which is a definitely-for-profit organization….”

AAS Journals Will Switch to Open Access in 2022

Research results in astronomy, solar physics, and planetary science are about to become more widely accessible to scientists and the public alike. The American Astronomical Society (AAS), a leading nonprofit professional association for astronomers, today announced the switch of its prestigious journals to fully open access (OA) as of 1 January 2022.

AAS Journals Will Switch to Open Access | American Astronomical Society

“Research results in astronomy, solar physics, and planetary science are about to become more widely accessible to scientists and the public alike. The American Astronomical Society (AAS), a leading nonprofit professional association for astronomers, today announced the switch of its prestigious journals to fully open access (OA) as of 1 January 2022.

Under this change, all articles in the AAS journal portfolio will be immediately open for anyone to freely read. The transition will affect the Astronomical Journal (AJ), the Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL), and the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS); the Planetary Science Journal, the AAS’s newest journal published in partnership with its Division for Planetary Sciences, is already fully open access….”

Physicists lose in ARC pre-print shambles | Campus Morning Mail

“On instruction of the Senate, the Australian Research Council reported yesterday on grant applications ruled ineligible for breaking the rule against including any reference to pre-prints

17 Future Fellowship applications were excluded out of 675 and 15  out of 996 were cut from consideration for the Discovery Early Career Researcher Award.

All excluded applications were either in astronomy/space science or (mainly) from four FoR categories of physics….

As Danny Kingsley points out (CMM August 23) physicists have been using pre-prints for 30 years. “Why were the serious implications of this requirement only noticed at the point where applications were excluded?” she asks.”

The Pierre Auger Observatory shares 10% of data | symmetry magazine

“Pierre Auger scientists have released data before, both in their open-access scientific publications and for the purposes of education and outreach on their website. But this is the first time they’ve released such detailed information about each cosmic-ray event. The release includes 10% of their dataset through 2018—a collection of every 10th recorded event….”