Transforming the Scholarly Publishing Economy: Reflections on the First Three Years | April 2022

“As a follow-up to our CNI reporting in 2020, this briefing will focus on the status of The Ohio State University Libraries’ Transforming the Scholarly Publishing Economy strategic initiative. We are taking stock of the first three years of our initiative and looking toward renewing our strategic efforts in this space. We will highlight our current portfolio of transformational and transitional agreements, our support for open scholarly infrastructure and publishing, and our work with our consortial partners. We will also share our current thinking on future directions for our initiative.”

Coalition for Networked Information

Open Research Assistant (R220250) | Aston University

Within Library Services, you will work collaboratively with the other team members, offering mutual support in managing workload and developing proposals for service improvements and new initiatives. Our team also works closely with staff in Research and Knowledge Exchange and the Graduate School to support Open Research across the University. Library Services are currently working in a hybrid way with a mix of on-campus and remote working. We are open to discussions with the post-holder on location and flexibility of working hours, as long as the project can be successfully delivered. We also welcome applicants who are seeking external or internal secondments, with permission from their current employer. Aston University is located within Birmingham City Centre and has accessible transport links, via bus or train and a cycle to work scheme. We offer a generous annual leave scheme with 30 days annual leave and a further 13 days bank holiday and University closure days.

UiT’s Open Access policy

“At UiT The Arctic University of Norway, all academic publications shall be accessible in open access journals or open repositories.

The following applies to scientific work with a publication date of 1. January 2022 or later: Regardless of the publication channel, full-text copies of scientific articles written by employees and students at UiT shall be uploaded (deposited) in the national register (currently called Cristin).

If the article is published with open access with the publisher (gold open access), the publisher’s PDF (Published version, Version of Record) must be uploaded.
If the article is published in a closed channel (subscription journal) that does not allow self-archiving of the publisher’s PDF, the latest peer-reviewed manuscript version (accepted manuscript, Author’s Accepted Manuscript, postprint) must be uploaded.

All uploaded full-text copies will be made openly available in the institutional archive (currently called Munin). Authors who wish to make a reservation against making a full-text copy available in Munin can apply for an exemption. More information about this can be found under Self-archiving.

By not applying for an exemption, UiT’s employees and students give the institution permission to make full text copies available in the open institutional archive (currently called Munin) under a Creative Commons license, in line with prevailing international practice in gree Open Access infrastructure. Read more about the rules and procedures in Principles for open access to scientific publications at UiT Norway’s Arctic University….”

Rights Retention Pilot | Open Access

“These webpages contain information on the rights retention pilot currently in place at the University of Cambridge.

The University needs to be able to disseminate research and scholarship as widely as possible and comply with its funder requirements, while enabling its researchers to publish in a journal of their choice. 

In order to achieve this, the University has established pilot rights retention scheme on an opt-in basis. This pilot will be closely monitored and reviewed with a view to informing the next revision of the University’s Open Access policy.

To sign up for the pilot, please use this webform.

During this time, if you sign up for the pilot, you should include the following wording in a prominent place in the manuscript (e.g. the acknowledgements and/or funding statement) and cover letter from the initial point of submission:

‘For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising from this submission’

Upon editorial acceptance, please upload a copy of the accepted manuscript to Symplectic Elements. The Open Access team will deposit the manuscript into Apollo and will release it publicly at the appropriate time.

This pilot is based on the approach that the University of Edinburgh is taking with their new Research Publications and Copyright Policy and considers the advice of Harvard University, where rights retention statements have been in use since 2008. We thank both universities for sharing their materials and welcome the reuse of the contents of our document by other institutions.?…”

Successful implementation of Open Access strategies at Universities of Science & Technology

“While the CWTS Leiden ranking has been available since 2011/2012, it is only in 2019 that a first attempt was made at ranking institutions by Open Access-related indicators. This was due to the arrival of Unpaywall as a tool to measure openly available institutional research outputs – either via the Green or the Gold OA routes – for a specific institution.

The CWTS Leiden ranking by percentage of the institutional research output published Open Access effectively meant the first opportunity for institutions worldwide to be ranked by the depth of their Open Access implementation strategies brushing aside aspects like their size. This provided an interesting way to map the progress of CESAER Member institutions that were part of the Task Force Open Science 2020-2021 Open Access Working Group (OAWG) towards the objective stated by Plan S of achieving 100% Open Access of research outputs.

The OAWG then set out to map the situation of the Member institutions represented in it on this Open Access ranking and to track their evolution on subsequent editions of this ranking. The idea behind this analysis was not so much to introduce an element of competition across institutions but to explore whether progress was taking place in the percentage of openly available institutional research outputs year on year.

The results of this analysis – shown in figures within this paper for the 2019, 2020 and 2021 editions – show strong differences across Member institutions that are part of the OAWG. From internal discussions within the group, it became evident that these differences could be explained through a number of factors that contributed to a successful Open Access implementation at an institutional level. This provided the basis for this work.

The document identifies four key factors that contribute to a successful OA implementation at institutions, and hence to achieving a good position on the CWTS Leiden ranking for Open Access. These factors are:

• Open Access policies. This aspect is highlighted as the key driver for a successful OA implementation: high-ranked institutions typically implement strong OA policies, whereas low-ranked ones often lack a specific policy beyond the (common) one issued by the European Commission for its framework programmes.

• Institutional system configuration (repositories and/or current research information system (CRIS) systems). The way institutional systems support OA implementation are configured is also a critical element for a high ranking. High-ranked institutions within the OAWG often have an interconnected institutional repository and a CRIS. Other institutions only operate a repository and some have neither.

• Institutional research support staff. A strong OA policy and an adequately configured set of institutional systems may not be enough to guarantee a successful OA implementation if the research support staff behind such work is not numerous or well-trained enough.

• Open Access advocacy strategies. One of the key areas of activity for such staff is the communication with researchers to highlight the relevance of Open Access implementation at a given institution and to provide the required support workflows….”

Analyzing Institutional Publishing Output-A Short Course – Google Docs

“This short course provides training materials about how to create a set of publication data, gather additional information about the data through an API (Application Programming Interface), clean the data, and analyze the data in various ways. The API that we’ll use is from Unpaywall and helps gather information related to the open access (OA) status of the item. This short course was created for the Scholarly Communication Notebook. If open access is new to you, we recommend checking out Peter Suber’s book Open Access. It’s concise and well written. Although things have changed since it was published in 2012, it’s a great place to start….”

UKRI Open Access Policy Update | Open Access

“A Rights Retention pilot at Cambridge

We are setting up a Rights Retention pilot, and more information will be available by April 2022.

By opting into the pilot as a Cambridge author, you will grant the University a non?exclusive, irrevocable, worldwide licence to make the accepted manuscripts of your scholarly articles publicly available under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence (or an alternative licence if requested) in line with funder requirements. You will still need to include the Rights Retention Statement when submitting your articles for publication, however the agreement with the University adds an extra layer of protection in case a journal asks you to sign away copyright and impose an embargo.  …”

Open Learning Talks | Open Education, Cultural Collection, and Curation: Focus on HBCUs – YouTube

“Although more learners and educators continue to adopt and create open education resources (OERs), there has been a dearth of culturally-relevant content created by and curated for underserved and underrepresented populations. In this Open Learning Talk, we’ll hear from members of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and learn about their journey to opening up and creating a more inclusive canon of OER for HBCUs and the world.”

Author Rights Policy » Digital Partnerships & Strategies » UF Libraries » University of Florida

“The Faculty of the University of Florida is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research as widely as possible. By this policy, and with the assistance of the University, Faculty can more easily and collectively reserve rights that might otherwise be signed away, often unnecessarily, in agreements with publishers….

Each Faculty member grants to the University of Florida nonexclusive permission to make available scholarly articles authored by the Faculty member and to exercise the copyright in those articles. In legal terms, the permission granted by each Faculty member is a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each scholarly article, in any medium, and to authorize others to do the same, provided that the articles are not sold. Upon publication of a scholarly article authored by the Faculty member, the University of Florida automatically grants to the Faculty member the right to disseminate the accepted manuscript version of the article in any nonprofit repository at any time. This policy does not transfer copyright ownership, which remains with Faculty authors under existing University of Florida policy….”

How UiT The Arctic University of Norway protects researchers’ freedom to choose whatever publication venue they want | Plan S

In 2008 Harvard’s Faculty of Arts & Sciences voted unanimously to adopt a ground-breaking open access policy. Since then, over 70 other institutions, including other Harvard faculties, Stanford and MIT, have adopted similar policies based on the Harvard model. In Europe such institutional policies have, so far, been slow to get off the ground.

We are beginning to see that situation change. In 2021 the University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway (UiT) adopted an Open Access policy that came into force on 1st January 2022.

Here, UiT members Camilla Brekke (Prorector for Research and Development), Johanne Raade (Library Director), Tanja Larssen (Open Science Advisor) and Per Pippin Aspaas (Head of Library Research and Publishing Support), tell us about the process of creating and implementing their policy….”

College and University Leaders Join Forces to Advance Open Science

In a push to make scholarly outputs more transparent and beneficial to a broader community, leaders from a diverse array of 65 U.S. colleges and universities are joining forces to advance the principles and practices of open scholarship. The partnership will ensure that as many students, faculty, practitioners, policy makers, and community members as possible have access to, and a voice in, research and scholarship.

New open access policy within Utrecht University | News @ Utrecht University

Utrecht University aims at a publishing climate in which academic authors publish fully open access (OA). The Executive Board of Utrecht University has agreed to a new OA policy to realise this ambition.

 

Demystifying teaching, learning and research through institutional repositories in higher learning institutions in Kenya | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of ways in which teaching, learning and research can be demystified in higher institutions of learning (HILs). Over the last decade, HILs around the world have faced various transformations to adapt to new opportunities for knowledge dissemination and utilization. Many benefits are gained from implementation of the platform including visibility, status and increased reputation. Despite the high uptake of institutional repositories (IRs) to guide teaching, learning and research of higher institutions learning’s digital resources more effectively, little has been written on how IRs can be used for effective teaching, learning and research in higher institutions of learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Using analytical method, this paper analysed and presented various thematical issues on IRs in relation to its efficacy, while proposing solutions for its sustainability.

Findings

The paper found that most universities have embraced IRs as an option for increasing their visibility, status and researchers’ relevance in the knowledge world. It is the conclusion of the study that IRs are currently recognized as an essential infrastructure to respond to the higher institutions of learning challenges in the digital world.

Practical implications

This paper provides higher institutions of learning an opportunity to prepare their IRs to demystify teaching, learning and research. Since IRs will make it possible to access variety of information at any time whenever required.

Social implications

Knowledge accessibility and utilization bring about social change in the society.

Originality/value

Little has been documented on how IRs can be used for effective teaching, teaching, learning and research in HILs. This paper provides an analysis of ways in which teaching, learning and research can be demystified in these institutions. Thus, it contributes new knowledge on demystifying teaching, learning and research through IRs in HILs.

Open research policy — Birkbeck, University of London

“3.1 All research outputs produced by researchers from the College (i.e. by researchers employed by the College and research produced by research students supervised by the College) should be deposited in our institutional repository, BIROn.

3.2 Paragraphs 3.4 to 3.8 inclusive relate specifically to the following types of research publication produced:

Short-form outputs:

Peer-reviewed journal articles accepted for publication in a journal or by an online publishing platform that publishes original work (rather than a platform which aggregates and/or republishes content). This includes peer-reviewed secondary data publications such as review articles.
Peer-reviewed conference papers accepted for publication in a journal, conference proceeding with an ISSN, or by an online publishing platform that publishes original work.

Long-form outputs:

Book chapters bearing an ISBN, including chapters in academic books arising from conferences
Academic monographs, including academic monographs which have more than one author
Edited collections, where the requirements relate to the complete collection….”

UW Libraries to Launch Journal of Open Educational Resources in Higher Education | News | University of Wyoming

“University of Wyoming Libraries soon will launch the Journal of Open Educational Resources in Higher Education (JOERHE), a new, open peer-reviewed journal.

The journal is currently accepting scholarly articles that critically analyze the role of open educational resources (OER) in higher education for its debut issue. The journal is anticipated to launch this fall. …”