OpenAIRE’s self-assessment of the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI) | January 2022

“The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI) offers a set of guidelines by which open scholarly infrastructure organisations and initiatives that support the research community can be run and sustained. OpenAIRE builds on these principles as a signal of our commitement to serve the research community in the long run….”

Addressing Open Science challenges in Romania – OpenAIRE Blog

“OpenAIRE Team has the pleasure of speaking to Alina Irimia, Open Science projects coordinator at UEFISCDI [Executive Agency for Higher Education, Research and Innovation Funding] in Romania. Mrs Irimia, talked about the priority to connect and engage the Romanian community to the open science dynamics through a national dedicated platform that is now under development.  …

UEFISCDI administrates the major part of the public Research, Development and Technology (RDT) competitive funds in Romania but is also actively involved in evidence-based policy making. The institution administrates the major tools that support collaboration and dialogue between Research Development and Innovation (RDI)actors involved in research and innovation: BrainMap and ERRIS. Since 2014, UEFISCDI has been contributing to the actions of the European Commission towards strengthening the policies and practices in support of open science. Through the Open Science Knowledge Hub Romania (OSKH) created in 2019, our institution is connected to the major initiatives dedicated to the development and implementation of the European Open Science Strategy and the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC): being the Romanian OpenAIRE NOAD, a member in the EOSC Association, a partner in the NI4OS project and the RDA Node Romania. For Open Science policies support we also collaborate with Science Europe, CoNOSC and the UNESCO Chair for Science and Innovation Policies – SNSPA. Currently, OSKH-UEFISCDI contributes significantly to the development of the national strategic framework for Open Science, part of a project financed through structural funds, developed in partnership with the Ministry of Research, Innovation and Digitisation….

Among the many challenges facing Open Science, three main dimensions impact cultural change and may inhibit or unblock a real transition to OS, and they should be clearly addressed in the near future in the national context: 1) career evaluation, rewards and incentives – career benefits or on the contrary, disadvantages for researchers who promote Open Science; 2) costs – Open Science is a costly process both in terms of OA publications and FAIR data; identifying the specific needs of the national context and engaging in transformative negotiations with major journals are essential, along with creating new mechanisms for collaboration and funding; 3) Open Science literacy – providing long-term opportunities for capacity building to support the systemic change….”

What is in the EOSC for Arts and Humanities researchers? | DARIAH Open

by Erzsébet Tóth Czifra and Laure Barbot

EOSC (staying for the European Open Science Cloud) is a big acronym, representing the bold vision of enabling all European researchers to deposit, access and analyze scholarly resources beyond borders and disciplines. Over the past years, it has become a central component of European science policy and, since its launch in October 2018, a reality as an infrastructure too. Still, due to the scale, the complexity and the multiple dimensions of the endeavor, it is not easy to gain an accurate overview and translate the offerings of the EOSC into one’s own institution or research setting. In this series of blog posts, we outline concrete ways in which scholarly and service provider communities around DARIAH can interact with the EOSC and the value it holds for them. We also summarize the many ways in which DARIAH already contributes to the EOSC. 

To kick start the series, in the first post we have a look at what the EOSC holds for researchers and, in particular,  Arts and Humanities researchers.

Open Research Quarterly Update – Issue 2: June 2021

“Hello, and welcome to the June issue of the Open Research Quarterly Update (Digest). Here in the Open Research Services team at Jisc our mission is to help members embrace the benefits of open research by removing barriers, embedding open practices and developing open infrastructure. Much of our focus across Jisc involves working with the sector to negotiate agreements and develop services which underpin open research. This quarter’s update includes numerous examples of this in action.

Publications Router continues to expand its publishers’ contributions, while the Sherpa team have developed a new dataset which will provide details of Transitional Agreements to our users. In addition, Jisc Collections have been working with SCONUL to provide the Unsub dashboard. This month sees the first meeting of the Research Identifier National Coordinating Council (RINCC) on 21st June, which will coincide with the publication of a Cost Benefit Analysis Report, funded by the UK Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) for Open Access project….”

open-science-in-a-click-through-the-openaire-open-science-lens

“How many hours do we spend on browsing the internet and searching for the article that supports our research and topic of focus? Plenty. For more than ten years, OpenAIRE has enabled us to find an open access publication via OpenAIRE Explore, since OpenAIRE Research Graph offers a massive collection of research data. That is the best case scenario, where we are already familiar with OpenAIRE and the Open Science ecosystem services. But science evolves, publications exponentially grow, and we seek for shortcuts and easy, trustable ways to perform work. OpenAIRE through its Open Innovation Call, funded by the OpenAIRE-Advance project and European Commission (GA:777541) back in 2020, called for new ideas and innovations to shape future tools for Open Science users. One of the tools introduced today is the Open Science Lens….”

Open search tools need sustainable funding – Research Professional News

“The Covid-19 pandemic has triggered an explosion of knowledge, with more than 200,000 papers published to date. At one point last year, scientific output on the topic was doubling every 20 days. This huge growth poses big challenges for researchers, many of whom have pivoted to coronavirus research without experience or preparation.

Mainstream academic search engines are not built for such a situation. Tools such as Google Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science provide long, unstructured lists of results with little context.

These work well if you know what you are looking for. But for anyone diving into an unknown field, it can take weeks, even months, to identify the most important topics, publication venues and authors. This is far too long in a public health emergency.

The result has been delays, duplicated work, and problems with identifying reliable findings. This lack of tools to provide a quick overview of research results and evaluate them correctly has created a crisis in discoverability itself. …

Building on these, meta-aggregators such as Base, Core and OpenAIRE have begun to rival and in some cases outperform the proprietary search engines. …”

Towards a global knowledge commons – COAR advances interoperability and alignment internationally – COAR

“Since the launch of COAR in 2009, a major strategic priority for the organization has been the alignment of repository networks across the world. In 2015 these efforts were expanded through the support of the European Commission-funded OpenAIRE2020 and OpenAIRE Advance project….”

 

Towards a global knowledge commons – COAR advances interoperability and alignment internationally – COAR

“Since the launch of COAR in 2009, a major strategic priority for the organization has been the alignment of repository networks across the world. In 2015 these efforts were expanded through the support of the European Commission-funded OpenAIRE2020 and OpenAIRE Advance project….”

 

openaire-nexus-project

“OpenAIRE-Nexus brings in Europe, EOSC and the world a set of services to implement and accelerate Open Science. To embed in researchers workflows, making it easier for them to accept and uptake Open Science practices of openness and FAIRness. To give the tools to libraries, research communities to make their content more visible and discoverable. To assist policy makers to better understand the environment and ramifications of Open Science into new incentives, scientific reward criteria, impact indicators, so as to increase research and innovation potential. To foster innovation, by providing SMEs with open data about scientific production. To this aim, OpenAIRE-Nexus onboards to the EOSC fourteen services, provided by public institutions, einfrastructures, and companies, structured in three portfolios: PUBLISH, MONITOR and DISCOVER. The services are widely used in Europe and beyond and integrated in OpenAIRE-Nexus to assemble a uniform Open Science Scholarly Communication package for the EOSC. The project aims at forming synergies with other INFRAEOSC-07 awarded projects, the INFRAEOSC-03 project, research infrastructures, einfrastructures, and scholarly communication services define a common Open Science interoperability framework for the EOSC, to facilitate sharing, monitoring, and discovery of EOSC resources across disciplines….”

openaire-nexus-project

“OpenAIRE-Nexus brings in Europe, EOSC and the world a set of services to implement and accelerate Open Science. To embed in researchers workflows, making it easier for them to accept and uptake Open Science practices of openness and FAIRness. To give the tools to libraries, research communities to make their content more visible and discoverable. To assist policy makers to better understand the environment and ramifications of Open Science into new incentives, scientific reward criteria, impact indicators, so as to increase research and innovation potential. To foster innovation, by providing SMEs with open data about scientific production. To this aim, OpenAIRE-Nexus onboards to the EOSC fourteen services, provided by public institutions, einfrastructures, and companies, structured in three portfolios: PUBLISH, MONITOR and DISCOVER. The services are widely used in Europe and beyond and integrated in OpenAIRE-Nexus to assemble a uniform Open Science Scholarly Communication package for the EOSC. The project aims at forming synergies with other INFRAEOSC-07 awarded projects, the INFRAEOSC-03 project, research infrastructures, einfrastructures, and scholarly communication services define a common Open Science interoperability framework for the EOSC, to facilitate sharing, monitoring, and discovery of EOSC resources across disciplines….”