Collaboration across open science education: working towards a FAIR and open future – EOSC synergy

“Two years ago, the EOSC Synergy project presented at the Open Education Conference (OER20) outlining our aim to contribute to the development of a sustainable infrastructure for open learning in the European Open Science Cloud. 

Today we are presenting again at OER22 in London, providing an update on the project, but even more importantly providing a story of collaboration across the open science education and training world, bringing together communities from different countries, roles and disciplines.  

These collaborations enabled EOSC Synergy to situate its activities in a global network linked by a shared aim of working towards making open and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Re-usable) principles the norm for research, but also for research training and education.  

The collaborations provide many examples of the conference theme ‘open in action’ and focus on different areas of openness: from community building and sharing practice across different parts of the open science education community, to creating shared resources and joining up infrastructure and resources. 

This presentation reflects on the nature of the collaborations and lessons learned, presenting details of their outputs and future plans. We aim to raise awareness of these activities and build further bridges between the open education and open science communities. In this post we highlight a selection of collaborations EOSC Synergy has been involved in focussing on open science training and education. …”

Building stronger infrastructures to support open access books: LYRASIS, DOAB and OAPEN | Directory of Open Access Books

In 2021, DOAB and OAPEN entered into a new partnership with LYRASIS to develop its services for U.S. partners. As the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) continues to grow, now including well over 50,000 open access books, Sharla Lair, Senior Strategist of Open Access and Scholarly Communication at LYRASIS, and Tom Mosterd, Community Manager DOAB-OAPEN recently discussed what libraries, publishers and other U.S. partners may expect from both open infrastructure services for open access books in the near future.

 

Building stronger infrastructures to support open access books: LYRASIS, DOAB and OAPEN

In 2021, DOAB and OAPEN entered into a new partnership with LYRASIS to develop its services for U.S. partners. As the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) continues to grow, now including well over 50,000 open access books, Sharla Lair, Senior Strategist of Open Access and Scholarly Communication at LYRASIS, and Tom Mosterd, Community Manager DOAB-OAPEN recently discussed what libraries, publishers and other U.S. partners may expect from both open infrastructure services for open access books in the near future.

Rapid Science

“Open, collaborative research accelerates scientific discovery, yet there are serious roadblocks to sharing data and insights. First, team science requires time and attention. Second, the current incentive system of ‘publish or perish’ positions collaborators as competitors. Our solutions include tools, facilitated sharing, and rewards….”

Accelerating Open Research: A Multi-stakeholder Discussion – The Scholarly Kitchen

“As we move through a transition to a fully open research environment, there are challenges for all stakeholders in the ecosystem. Many funders have taken a leadership role in driving this transition, yet even with funder mandates in place for nearly two decades, the transition to open research globally has been slow (Larivière and Sugimoto, 2018). 

A recent study led by the Research on Research Institute (Waltman et al., 2021 ) found that commitments to open research and data sharing fell short during the pandemic and that lack of collaboration was a key factor. 

On the 10th February 2022, the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) Publisher-Funder Task Force convened a closed forum of funders, publishers, librarians and academics to discuss how collaborating among stakeholder groups may accelerate a transition to open research. The meeting was conducted under the Chatham House Rule, enabling 22 international participants to freely express opinions and ideas without fear of comments being attributed to those present. …

To this end, they discussed these questions:

Where have funder policies and mandates succeeded as tools for change? What are some of the challenges?
How might we collaborate to ensure that researchers are able to engage constructively with this transition?
How might we collaborate to ensure that we are building a truly equitable global system of open research? 
How might we collaborate to ensure a sustainable approach to accelerating the transition to open research, allowing for stakeholders to thrive amidst a culture of openness? …”

CfP: Open-Access-Tage 2022: “Collaboration” (Bern, September 19-21, 2022)

Open Access Days 2022 will be held by the University Library of Bern from 19 to 21 September. They are dedicated to the topic of collaboration.

The transformation of the publication system towards more openness and transparency is a task that can only be accomplished together. Therefore, the collaboration of libraries with researchers, other institutions and networks, funders and service providers is immensely important. As these collaborations are central to the development of goals, strategies and programmes for the promotion of OA, as well as to the day-to-day work on and for OA, this year’s Open Access Days 2022 in Bern will be held under the motto “Collaboration”.
Call for Proposals

Proposals for talks, workshops, posters, amounts for the Tool Marketplace and notifications for moderation can be submitted until these dates:

    Lectures and workshops until 11.4.2022
    Posters, tool marketplace and moderation until 4.7.2022

 

 

Die Open-Access-Tage 2022 werden von der Universitätsbibliothek Bern vom 19. bis 21. September durchgeführt. Sie widmen sich dem Thema Kollaboration.

Der Wandel des Publikationssystems zu mehr Offenheit und Transparenz ist eine Aufgabe, die nur gemeinsam bewerkstelligt werden kann. Daher ist die Zusammenarbeit von Bibliotheken mit Forschenden, anderen Institutionen und Netzwerken, Förderern und Dienstleistern immens wichtig. Da diese Zusammenarbeiten für die Entwicklung von Zielen, Strategien und Programmen zur Förderung von Open Access sowie für die alltägliche Arbeit an und für Open Access zentral sind, finden die diesjährigen Open-Access-Tage 2022 in Bern unter dem Motto «Kollaboration» statt.

Call for Proposals

Vorschläge für Vorträge, Workshops, Posters, Beträge für den Tool-Marktplatz und Meldungen für Moderationen können bis zu diesen Daten eingereicht werden:

Vorträge und Workshops bis 11.4.2022
Poster, Tool-Marktplatz und Moderation bis 4.7.2022

International Tensions and “Science Nationalism” in a Networked World: Strategies and Implications

“The Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) Executive Roundtable that took place as part of the CNI Fall 2020 Virtual Membership Meeting examined the collision between developing international tensions and science nationalism on one side, and trends towards global, network-based collaboration and scholarly communication, particularly as driven by the adoption of open science practices, on the other….

There is a very broad-based effort to restructure the terms of open access (OA) publishing across the globe through so-called “transformative agreements” and efforts such as the European Union-based Plan S, which stipulates (among other things) that scientific publications resulting from publicly funded research be published in OA journals or platforms. Currently there’s a rough and still tentative alignment between the US and Europe on this effort; in particular, there is some ambiguity about the extent of support by US federal funders, as distinct from research universities (who have a wide range of views), for the Plan S style approach. Given the scale of publishing by Chinese researchers, it seems likely that unless China supports this restructuring effort, the economics globally will be at best problematic. While a few years ago some Chinese scholarly organizations seem to have expressed conceptual support for both this kind of OA and related initiatives about open research data, it’s unclear where this commitment now stands, or how it may relate to other emerging Chinese scholarly publishing strategies….

Some recent policy announcements seem to suggest that China is de-emphasizing the importance of publishing in very high prestige Western journals; interestingly, this is being cast as consistent with the efforts of Western and global open science advocates to focus assessments of scholarly impact on quality rather than quantity, and to de-emphasize measures such as the impact factor of the journals that results are published in. Note that to the extent that China is, or may be, investing in a national publishing infrastructure, this implies shifting investment away from contributions that might support a global restructuring of the Western scholarly publishing system (discussed above) towards new OA models. …”

Bringing All the Stakeholders to the Table: A Collaborative Approach to Data Sharing

Abstract: Objective: This paper examines a unique data set disclosure process at a medium sized, land grant, research university and the campus collaboration that led to its creation. Methods: The authors utilized a single case study methodology, reviewing relevant documents and workflows. As first-hand participants in the collaboration and disclosure process development, their own accounts and experiences also were utilized. Results: A collaborative approach to enhancing research data sharing is essential, considering the wide array of stakeholders involved across the life cycle of research data. A transparent, inclusive data set disclosure process is a viable route to ensuring research data can be appropriately shared. Conclusions: Successful sharing of research data impacts a range of university units and individuals. The establishment of productive working relationships and trust between these stakeholders is critical to expanding the sharing of research data and to establishing shared workflows. 

The Online Coalition Game: A tool for online interactive coalition formation research | SpringerLink

Abstract:  In this paper, we present the Online Coalition Game (OCG): an open-source tool written for the open-access research platform oTree that enables high-powered interactive coalition formation experiments. Besides containing a tutorial on conducting and configuring studies using the OCG, we discuss two previous implementations. With these examples, we demonstrate that online use of the OCG provides the benefits of large sample sizes and fast data collection, while leading to convergent and robust findings. Moreover, we show that small changes in the experimental setup offer interesting opportunities to expand coalition formation theory by including insights from, amongst others, literature on bargaining, ostracism, and communication, and vice versa.

 

“A Collaborative Approach to Data Sharing” by Megan N. O’Donnell and Curtis Brundy

Abstract:  Objective: This paper examines a unique data set disclosure process at a medium sized, land grant, research university and the campus collaboration that led to its creation.

Methods: The authors utilized a single case study methodology, reviewing relevant documents and workflows. As first-hand participants in the collaboration and disclosure process development, their own accounts and experiences also were utilized.

Results: A collaborative approach to enhancing research data sharing is essential, considering the wide array of stakeholders involved across the life cycle of research data. A transparent, inclusive data set disclosure process is a viable route to ensuring research data can be appropriately shared.

Conclusions: Successful sharing of research data impacts a range of university units and individuals. The establishment of productive working relationships and trust between these stakeholders is critical to expanding the sharing of research data and to establishing shared workflows.

foldercase | Manage your research projects and collaborations

“Foldercase is a collaboration platform for research project management…

Capture everyting you need for your scientific work on one platform, such that your team is always up-to-date….

Organize your projects in a harmonized way across your institution to effectively communicate and share resources….

Search your data infrastructure in seconds, through anonymized indexing….

Have project-specific discussions with your colleagues, share files and contribute to collaborations….

Let members of your collaborations see relevant parts of your data infrastructure, in order to support your joint work….

Set project-related tasks with your team and track progress to advance faster….”

ASAP: Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s

“The Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s (ASAP) initiative is devoted to accelerating the pace of discovery and informing the path to a cure for Parkinson’s disease through collaboration, research-enabling resources, and data sharing….

 

 

The Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s (ASAP) initiative is devoted to accelerating the pace of discovery and informing the path to a cure for Parkinson’s disease through collaboration, research-enabling resources, and data sharing….”

 

Guest Post – Perspectives on a “Unified Approach” to the Future of Open Access   – The Scholarly Kitchen

“This post is a thought experiment conducted by two individuals, both with interest in advancing open access, but who are situated in quite different contexts within the scholarly communication milieu. Melissa is a librarian at a large state university in the United States. Michael is the Open Access Program Manager at a small/mid-size Canadian scholarly publisher. We originally met through the SSP fellowship program. Our earliest conversations revealed that we both shared a passion for open access, yet we recognized that our perspectives differed in some respects. We began discussing how different stakeholders who comprise various areas of the scholarly ecosystem may also view open access through their own lenses, which could in turn impact how we work together to identify solutions to open access challenges.

To explore this concept further, we undertook an experiment: we each went off on our own and drafted a high-level synopsis on our own personal perspectives on the opportunities and challenges of an open access future. Once we had each drafted our viewpoints, we reconvened and discussed the results, identifying areas where we agreed and areas where we diverged in our perspectives. The outcome of this experiment highlights how stakeholders, and indeed different individuals, may have contrasting viewpoints on open access as they look through their own lens. The following is our attempt to view open access through the cloud of difference and disagreement, to see what a “unified approach” to open access looks like at a personal and local level.”

ResearchHub | Open Science Community

“ResearchHub’s mission is to accelerate the pace of scientific research. Our goal is to make a modern mobile and web application where people can collaborate on scientific research in a more efficient way, similar to what GitHub has done for software engineering.

Researchers are able to upload articles (preprint or postprint) in PDF form, summarize the findings of the work in an attached wiki, and discuss the findings in a completely open and accessible forum dedicated solely to the relevant article.

Within ResearchHub, papers are grouped in “Hubs” by area of research. Individual Hubs will essentially act as live journals within focused areas, within highly upvoted posts. (i.e the paper and its associated summary and discussion) moving to the top of each Hub.

To help bring this nascent community together and incentivize contribution to the platform, a newly created ERC20 token, ResearchCoin (RSC), has been created. Users receive RSC for uploading new content to the platform, as well as for summarizing and discussion research. Rewards for contributions are proportionate to how valuable the community perceives the actions to be – as measured by upvotes.”