Optimising the UK’s university research infrastructure assets – Jisc

“This summary report brings together a range of perspectives from the UK’s higher education, research and innovation sector and stakeholder organisations.

It highlights some opportunities for collective approaches to optimise the use, sharing, efficiency and sustainability of research infrastructure assets, from the perspective of stakeholders in universities, regional consortia, funders and sector bodies from across the UK. It is intended as the beginning of a conversation and is for anyone interested in the opportunities we have identified….”

New Jisc research infrastructure assets report will drive collaboration | Jisc

“For the first time, UKRI-funded report brings together views of 15 major stakeholders from across the UK research community.

To gain an unprecedented insight into the UK’s academic research infrastructure assets, Jisc has collected the views of leading bodies from across the sector.

The new report, Optimising the UK’s university research infrastructure assets, aims to help identify more opportunities for collaboration, attracting investment, developing skills and reducing bureaucracy.

The UK’s university research infrastructure assets include equipment, facilities and the laboratories commissioned for research use across all disciplines.

The report outlines a range of perspectives from interviews with leaders and experts at 15 groups and stakeholder organisations from the UK’s higher education, research and innovation sector.

It highlights opportunities for new collaborative approaches to optimise the use, sharing, efficiency and sustainability of research infrastructure assets, and was funded by UK Research and Innovation.

The report identifies four key areas of opportunity for the research sector, which it recommends should receive extra investment to promote knowledge exchange and the commercialisation of research and development….”

Working towards an open, collaborative and reproducible data culture in archaeology | Zenodo

Abstract:  Data sharing is part of the recent developments in opening up scientific research (a movement also known as Open Science/Scholarship). By opening up more aspects of research than just the final output in the form of a publication, the transparency of scientific research increases and reproducibility of results improves. Opening up the scientific process also promotes equitable access to resources, facilitates collaborations, and allows for the recognition of outputs other than the traditional scientific publication, such as data, code and analysis protocols. Many funders (for example, the European Commission and Wellcome) and publishers (such as the American Journal of Biological Anthropology) now also require researchers to share the data underlying publications whenever possible. This talk will go deeper into ethical considerations of data sharing and why data sharing is beneficial. You will be introduced to tools that facilitate data sharing, as well as communities where you can find support throughout your journey towards a more open, collaborative, and reproducible data culture.

 

Open Science as a Means to Decolonize Scientific Publishing and Foster Fairer Research Collaborations

“In this 120-minute virtual workshop, participants will jointly explore pathways that work towards decolonizing research partnerships based on the principles of Open Science as a global public good. It will start with a presentation of innovative publishing experiences of the scientific journal Mountain Research and Development, followed by insights on ambivalent Open Science practices from the perspective of the Open Science Team of the University Library of Bern, as well as a presentation from two Trainees of Open Peer Reviewers in Africa. Mercury Shitindo, PhD Fellow in Research Ethics at St.Paul’s University, Kenya, and PaaNii Johnson, Full Professor in Food Science and Technology, CSIR College of Science and Technology, Ghana will share their experiences of the Open Peer Reviewers in Africa project. After these short inputs, an interactive “open space technology” format will allow participants to propose topics for discussion and delve into a co-learning process.”

Open Science in Developing Countries_AMPPS.pdf

Open science is growing as the mainstream in developed countries and is promoted by UNESCO. However, Open Science still needs to achieve its diversity, equity, and inclusivity (DEI) goals; indeed, the movement needs to catch up in the developing world. Recently, researchers from developing countries have started to make their voices heard, calling for a re-design of open science to suit developing countries (Onie, 2022, Nature), support for grassroots open science networks (Jin et al., in press, AMPPS), and to avoid potential harm (Ross-Hellauer, 2022, Nature).

Although these arguments may attract some attention to Open Science in developing countries, without actions, there will be no changes. Actions need practical guidance and examples, especially for early career researchers. Here, we are calling for co-authors for an invited paper that will be published in Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, a leading outlet focused on promoting open science methods and practices. Specifically, we are seeking co-authors for a paper that can provide practical guidance/examples for actions to promote open science in developing countries. We emphasize practical solutions and examples that are feasible and within reach of researchers in developing countries. Thus, we invite colleagues from different regions/countries to share their experiences, examples, and practical suggestions specific to their sociocultural backgrounds

This paper will collect practical solutions for researchers in different developing countries, with both a global view and fine-grained granularity to specific countries. It will provide a practical guide for researchers who hope to promote open science and DEI, as well as insights for policymakers, funders, and other stakeholders interested in promoting open science practices in their respective regions or countries….”

Open Science in Developing Countries_AMPPS.pdf

Open science is growing as the mainstream in developed countries and is promoted by UNESCO. However, Open Science still needs to achieve its diversity, equity, and inclusivity (DEI) goals; indeed, the movement needs to catch up in the developing world. Recently, researchers from developing countries have started to make their voices heard, calling for a re-design of open science to suit developing countries (Onie, 2022, Nature), support for grassroots open science networks (Jin et al., in press, AMPPS), and to avoid potential harm (Ross-Hellauer, 2022, Nature).

Although these arguments may attract some attention to Open Science in developing countries, without actions, there will be no changes. Actions need practical guidance and examples, especially for early career researchers. Here, we are calling for co-authors for an invited paper that will be published in Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, a leading outlet focused on promoting open science methods and practices. Specifically, we are seeking co-authors for a paper that can provide practical guidance/examples for actions to promote open science in developing countries. We emphasize practical solutions and examples that are feasible and within reach of researchers in developing countries. Thus, we invite colleagues from different regions/countries to share their experiences, examples, and practical suggestions specific to their sociocultural backgrounds

This paper will collect practical solutions for researchers in different developing countries, with both a global view and fine-grained granularity to specific countries. It will provide a practical guide for researchers who hope to promote open science and DEI, as well as insights for policymakers, funders, and other stakeholders interested in promoting open science practices in their respective regions or countries….”

Collaborative models for OA book publishers (Version 2.0) | Zenodo

B?aszczy?ska, Marta, Melinš?ak Zlodi, Iva, Morka, Agata, Proudman, Vanessa, & Stone, Graham. (2023). Collaborative models for OA book publishers (Version 2.0). Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7780754

Given the dynamic rate of change in the OA books business models landscape, the OPERAS Open Access Business Models Special Interest Group launched a survey in 2021 to 1) improve our understanding of the scholarly publishing landscape and of the challenges that publishers face in the context of publishing OA monographs; and 2) to identify main trends (including opportunities and challenges) and the knowledge of collaborative funding and infrastructure models in OA publishing in Social Science and the Humanities. This white paper updates and expands an earlier version published in 2021, which presented the preliminary analysis of the findings.

Despite a small sample of presses meaning that no strong trends ought to be discussed, several insights were drawn and should be considered important directions for the future. Key findings in the report have been grouped into three main areas: collaboration, funding, and support.

The report found that, although not opposed to the idea, a majority of presses do not engage in collaboration, specifically collaborative models for shared infrastructure, mainly due to the lack of knowledge and information, or perceived lack of need. This indicates that, for OA books, we are still at the early stage of the adoption curve for collaborative shared infrastructure.

In terms of funding, most publishers perceive themselves to be somewhat sustainable. For institutional publishers, parent organisations are crucial as providers of financial or non-monetary support of OA. In addition, most publishers stress the need to have more resources and rely on more than one funding source, including grants and subsidies.

The report found that awareness-raising and targeted support and training could be used to engage the presses but further incentivisation may be required to encourage publishers to collaborate more widely.

We believe that the insights from this white paper may be interesting to a number of projects, such as DIAMAS, OPERAS-PLUS, and Palomera and have presented areas for further research and more specific actionable points for these projects.

 

Sample Partnering Agreement Template | Ombudsman

Sample template for a deliberative approach by team members to assess and plan for key issues — e.g., collaboration rationale and readiness, inter- and intra-team communication, investigators’ technologies & resources, conflict management, budget issues, publication — that influence both scientific and collaborative success.

Keynote panel: Experimental Books – Re-imagining Scholarly Publishing, 13 March, 16:50-18:45 (GMT) | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

16:50-17:00 (GMT): Welcome

Prof. Gary Hall (COPIM, Centre for Postdigital Cultures, Coventry University)

 

17:00-18:30: Keynote panel session with a response by Dr. Lozana Rossenova (Open Science Lab, TIB Hannover)

 

Writing a Book As If Writing a Piece of Software
Keynote by Dr. Winnie Soon (Course Leader at the Creative Computing Institute, University of the Arts London, Associate Professor (on leave) at Aarhus University, visiting researcher at the Centre of the Study of the Networked Image (CSNI), London South Bank University)

The term “computational publishing” has emerged in recent scholarship and is used specifically to describe books as dynamic and computational objects that are open to re-versioning. Within this specific genre of computational publishing, this presentation focuses on characteristics and common approaches like free and open source software, community practices and programmable processes by discussing three examples. They are related to a Git repository, collaborative publishing software and a DIY book to explore the possible computational extensibility that is oriented more toward collective interventions, actions and practices. These examples examine a parallel between writing and coding that blurs the boundary between books and software, arguing that writing (publishing) a computational book is like writing (publishing) a piece of software.

 

Digital Space as Indigenous Territory, Scholarly Writing as Relational Practice: Reflections from the Collaborative Production of an Open Access Book
Keynote by Prof. Paige Raibmon (Department of History, University of British Columbia (UBC)).

As I Remember it is an open access digital book that shares teachings presented by the ?a?am?n Elder and knowledge keeper Elsie Paul with wide-ranging audiences.  Paul collaborated in order to produce this work with two of her grandchildren, Davis McKenzie and Harmony Johnson, and myself, a historian based at the University of British Columbia.  In this talk, I share discuss our multi-year, collaborative process in which we strove to design a digital book whose form aligns with the meanings embedded within the its content (i.e. the teachings as shared and remembered by Paul).   Principles of relationality, respect, and humility were central to our methodology and helped us navigate the potential promise and pitfalls of bringing Indigenous knowledge into an open access digital space.   Using a range of means, we visibly and interactively embedded ?a?am?n authority over ?a?am?n knowledge into the book.  We invite readers to approach the book as guests of a ?a?am?n host; and to consider the website itself as ?a?am?n territory.  Thus, this digital book attempts to do something quite different than simply sharing information about Paul’s life. It challenges wide-spread assumptions about scholarly method, production, authorship, expertise, and copyright.

I invite and encourage people to explore the book before my talk at: ravenspacepublishing.org/as-i-remember-it/

 

18:30-18:45: Closing Remarks

Dr. Janneke Adema (COPIM, Centre for Postdigital Cultures, Coventry University)

 

ICOR’s Broadened Mission: Connecting efforts to build open collaborative research | ICOR

“There could not be a better time to announce the re-launch of ICOR’s website — extending its mission described in this blog post over a year ago — featuring real-world efforts by the open science community to build an evidence base and best practices. The site now features community organizations that are planning, implementing, and refining tools and practices with a common goal and with an eye toward standardization and collective action to build open collaborative science.

This coincides with the remarkable memo from the White House naming 2023 the Year of Open Science, and similar announcements from US federal agencies.

In a recent SPARC article, ICOR co-founder Sarah Greene said, “with a system to track and score open science practices…the potential impact on the pace of discovery is tremendous…it will change science, unimaginably.” ICOR is committed to building a strong foundation for open research, working with community-based projects such as persistent identifier and repository organizations, funders and publishers testing new models and policies, team science advocates, and open source tool builders creating ways to measure openness….”

TRIPLE Conference 2023: Improving Discovery and Collaboration in Open Science – Sciencesconf.org

“Since 2019 the TRIPLE project has been developing the multilingual discovery platform GoTriple, aiming to facilitate interdisciplinary research and foster collaboration. The platform provides a central access point for users to explore, find, access and reuse Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) materials at European scale (data and publications, researcher’s profiles, projects). Users can find appropriate resources to support their own research and develop collaborative and interdisciplinary projects: different innovative tools are plugged to the platform to enhance the overall user experience. Data are automatically and continuously harvested with the active support of a vocabulary containing 11 languages for both resources and classification capabilities. GoTriple is part of the EOSC catalogue powered by the OPERAS Research Infrastructure.

GoTriple is dedicated to addressing pressing challenges that Social Sciences and Humanities face: data and research results are scattered along the lines of various disciplines, languages, catalogues and repositories, and collaboration – among researchers, enterprises, and citizens alike – is hindered. The service and its features are intended to soften and, eventually, overcome the borders that separate disciplines and researchers from each other. 

By providing a multilingual vocabulary, the creation of an open source API to enrich data and thereby offering an interdisciplinary, multilingual discovery service, GoTriple is intended to work as an intersection between various stakeholders in academia and society, enhance the low visibility of SSH results and improve their impact….”

New report provides insights into global OA landscape — and with a focus on China

A new report released today provides insights into the complex and evolving global Open Access landscape — and with a particular focus on China. The report is a product of a collaboration between STM Association and the China Association for Science and Technology (CAST) focused on the bilateral sharing of ideas and best practices in OA publishing.