The Gaping Problem At The Heart Of Scientific Research – CodeBlue

“But the very need for these groups to call for research to be made available in the middle of a global emergency demonstrates the failure of the current publishing system.

Making research immediately free to read, which, when combined with the use of an open publishing licence, is known as ‘open access’ — is a hot topic in science. Global health bodies know how important open research is, especially in times of emergency, which is why they have repeatedly called for research to be made open. 

The latest plaintive request came in August 2022 from the US White House Office of Science and Technology Policy for mpox research to be made open. Previous global calls were in 2016 for Zika and in 2018 for Ebola. 

The consequences of lack of access to research can be dire. In 2015 a group of African researchers claimed that an earlier Ebola outbreak could have been prevented if research on it had been published openly.

The past 12 months have seen a flurry of changes in open access globally and from January 2023, the high profile journal Science will allow published research to be immediately placed in publicly-accessible repositories at no cost to scientists.

In August 2022, the Office of Science and Technology Policy issued a memorandum to all US research funding agencies that by January 1, 2026, they must make all the research they fund immediately publicly available, along with the data behind that research….

As 2023 unfolds, it seems that the benefits of open access have been proved beyond doubt. The next emergency in front of us, climate change, is much more complex, and there too are calls for open access.

Serious investment in a variety of approaches is essential to ensure a diverse, equitable, open access future.”

Open Science Conference 2023 | United Nations

“Since 2019, when the Dag Hammarskjöld Library held the 1st Open Science Conference at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, the global open movement has been significantly enriched with new national and international policies and frameworks as well as daring and visionary initiatives, both private and public.

At the 2nd Global Open Science Conference, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change, in July 2021 more than a year into the pandemic that had upturned daily lives globally, participants from around the world engaged in a public dialogue focusing on what open science has learned from COVID-19 and how this can be applied into actions addressing the global climate crisis, at the interface of science, technology, policy and research. The Conference took stock of actions undertaken nationally and internationally, collected lessons learned and identified directions for the way forward. Open science was recognized as the keystone to assert everyone’s right “to share in scientific advancement and its benefits”. Speakers and audience asked for the complete overhaul of outdated scientific processes, publishing and research assessment practices that oppose open science principles, proposed global curation infrastructures for the record of science and platform-agnostic discovery services, as well as enhanced bibliodiversity, inclusivity, and multilingualism….”

Open Science Toolkit | UNESCO

“The UNESCO Open Science Toolkit is designed to support implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. The Toolkit is a set of guides, policy briefs, factsheets and indexes. Each piece is a living resource updated to reflect new developments and the status of implementation of the Recommendation. Elements of this toolkit are developed in collaboration with UNESCO Open Science partners or through discussions with and inputs from the members of the UNESCO Working Groups on Open Science….”

 

Open Science Conference 2023 | United Nations

“On 23 November 2021, following an inclusive, transparent and multistakeholder consultative process, UNESCO’s Recommendation on Open Science was adopted by 193 Member States during the 41st session of the Organization’s General Conference. “This Recommendation outlines a common definition, shared values, principles and standards for open science at the international level and proposes a set of actions conducive to a fair and equitable operationalization of open science for all at the individual, institutional, national, regional and international levels.” So what comes next?

From 8 to 10 February 2023 – in the lead-up to the International Day of Women and Girls in Science –, the 3rd Open Science Conference will bring together policy makers, representatives of intergovernmental organizations, researchers, scholars, librarians, publishers and civil society. Under the theme Accelerating the Sustainable Development Goals, Democratizing the Record of Science they will engage in a dialogue about the opportunities and challenges of practicing open science and explore initiatives, themes and perspectives into the open scientific method and the digital scholarly communications cycle….”

CHECKLIST FOR OPEN ACCESS PUBLISHERS ON IMPLEMENTING THE UNESCO RECOMMENDATION ON OPEN SCIENCE

“This document is part of the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit, designed to support implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. It has been produced in partnership with the Open  Access  Scholarly  Publishing  Association  (OASPA),  a  diverse  community  of  organizations  engaged  in  open  scholarship.  The  aim  is  to  provide  practical  assistance  to  the  open  access  publishing  community  to  better  understand  the  Recommendation  by  highlighting  the  areas  that apply to open access publishers who wish to support its implementation….”

 

The gaping problem at the heart of scientific research – The Week

“The benefits of open access have been proved beyond doubt….

National science agencies from nations including the UK, Australia, Italy, the United States and Brazil called for publishers to make coronavirus research immediately and freely accessible, which in the most part they did.

But the very need for these groups to call for research to be made available in the middle of a global emergency demonstrates the failure of the current publishing system. Making research immediately free to read, which, when combined with the use of an open publishing licence, is known as open access’ is a hot topic in science.

Global health bodies know how important open research is, especially in times of emergency, which is why they have repeatedly called for research to be made open….

The consequences of lack of access to research can be dire.

In 2015 a group of African researchers claimed that an earlier Ebola outbreak could have been prevented if research on it had been published openly….

As 2023 unfolds, it seems that the benefits of open access have been proved beyond doubt.

The next emergency in front of us, climate change, is much more complex, and there too are calls for open access.

Serious investment in a variety of approaches is essential to ensure a diverse, equitable, open access future.”

Analysis of Open Science Policy Recommendations Proposed in India’s 5th Science, Technology & Innovation Policy Draft

“One of the core principles of science is to aid socio-economic growth. Open science is a movement that reinforces the primacy of science in the direction of economic and social welfare. UNESCO’s recommendation on open science aims to provide an international framework for open science policy and practice. It endorses unrestricted access to scholarly publications and data, the use of digital technologies to drive scientific processes, more collaboration and cooperation among the actors in the scientific ecosystem, sharing of research infrastructure, acknowledgment of diverse knowledge systems, and science for society. Open science could enable a productive science ecosystem in global south countries through efficient knowledge circulation, resource sharing, and collaboration. Analysis of open science policy from a global south country can provide valuable insights. India is preparing to adopt an open science framework recommended in the 5th Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy (STIP) draft, released in December 2020. The STIP draft recommends open access to articles and research data from publicly funded projects, access to research infrastructure beyond the boundary of academic and research institutions, strengthening of Indian journals, and open educational resources. However, the draft lacks an exhaustive implementation plan. The draft falls short in devising strategies to foster collaboration between actors of the STI ecosystem, the inclusion of traditional knowledge systems, and society’s role in knowledge creation processes. The science policymakers and advisers of the Department of Science and Technology and the government of India should probe these areas to develop a more effective and inclusive open science framework.”

Open Science for Ukraine: the Case for International Cooperation

“The war in Ukraine and resulting destruction of research institutions have severely affected Ukrainian scientists. Almost 100,000 scientists still reside in Ukraine and require international support to continue their work. Ukrainian scientists would strongly benefit from an organized effort to support them through open science policies. As a result of the ongoing invasion, academic and research institutions in Ukraine have been physically damaged, and researchers face significant obstacles in trying to continue their work. This year, the International Science Council and an international collective of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine called on the scientific community to assist Ukraine by providing free access to archives, licensed software, and databases. International scientific societies and organizations such as UNESCO can use their resources to encourage collaboration and facilitate remote access to scientific resources for Ukrainian scientists. Open science policies will be key for preserving Ukrainian science and helping rebuild in the future.”

Launch of the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit

“Dr Lidia Brito, UNESCO Regional Director for Southern Africa, launched the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit at the Open Science Day (7 December) that took place on the margins of the World Science Forum 2022 in Cape Town, South Africa. 

The Toolkit is a collection of resources (guides, policy briefs, factsheets and indexes) designed to support implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. The Toolkit is a living document, and will be updated to reflect new developments in open science and the status of implementation of the Recommendation.

Iryna Kuchma, EIFL Open Access Programme Manager, participated in five working groups that developed the Toolkit. In addition, EIFL specifically contributed to two Checklists in the Toolkit, in collaboration with partners: the Checklist for universities on implementing the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, in collaboration with LIBSENSE (in English and in French), and the Checklist for open access publishers on implementing the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, in collaboration with OASPA (Open Access Scholarly Publishing Association) (in English and in French). …”

TCC Africa Promoting Open Science Policy Dialogue at the World Science Forum | Training Centre in Communication (TCC AFRICA)Training Centre in Communication (TCC AFRICA)

“Dr. Ezra Clark of UNESCO and Ms. Joy Owango of Training Centre in Communication (TCC Africa), moderated the discussions on UNESCO’s Open Science Day and Science Granting Councils Initiatives’ Annual Forum, which included presentations from other organizations and a roundtable discussion with experts. Speaking on ‘Open Science African Perspectives through Strategic Partnerships and Its Impact on Democratizing Knowledge’, Ms. Joy Owango, mentioned collaborations the organization has established with the Public Library of Science (PLOS), the Association of African Universities (AAU), and the East African Commission of Science (EASTECO). Additionally, she discussed the interventions by TCC Africa and these partners to advance institutional and regional policy dialogue on open science in Africa. The Open Science Day, was aimed at taking stock of the progress made in supporting the implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, and to share lessons learned and practical approaches on open science from across the world….”

Just released — new insights into OE in European Libraries of Higher Education 2022 – SPARC Europe

“We are pleased to announce the publication of our report, Open Education in European Libraries of Higher Education: Implementing the UNESCO Recommendation on OER. 

The report presents the findings of the third edition of our annual survey of European academic libraries on the topic of Open Education (OE) and Open Educational Resources (OER). It explores the work being done by European academic librarians to implement the UNESCO OER Recommendation, almost three years on from its initial publication in November 2019. 

Our 2022 survey is structured according to the five areas of action/objectives of the UNESCO OER Recommendation (indicated below) and includes detailed recommendations for each objective:

Objective 1 — Building capacity;
Objective 2 — Developing supportive policies;
Objective 3 — Encouraging diverse, equitable, and inclusive (DEI) access to quality OER;
Objective 4 — Sustaining OER;
Objective 5 — Promoting and reinforcing international collaboration. …”

Safeguarding science in the wake of conflict – International Science Council

“Full adoption of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recommendation on open science is highlighted as a pathway for enabling displaced scholars to continue their work, and supporting the (re)development of fragile science systems. Crucially, stakeholders must work together to develop sustainable frameworks in higher education and research systems for a more predictable and effective approach to the phases of preparedness, response and rebuilding in the aftermath of conflict or disaster….”

To make ‘open science’ a reality, key issues must be advanced – International Year of Basic Sciences for Development

“To make open science a reality, three key issues, as a priority, ought to be advanced globally, according to Peter Gluckman, President of the International Science Council (ISC).

The shaping of the open science paradigm has largely been achieved through the work of national academies, international scientific unions and associations, and related bodies that are represented in the membership of the International Science Council (ISC). National and regional funders of science have increasingly supported the open science imperative by investing in supportive infrastructures and promoting open access publishing as a condition of funding.

Now, UNESCO has taken a stance to formalize these trends at the international level through its Recommendation on Open Science. Despite the gaps in this document, it could have some important positive outcomes….”