The Paper-To-Pixels Workaround Activists Want To Use To Keep Libraries Online

“Decades after the recording industry decided, however grudgingly, to accept people ripping CDs into digital-music files, librarians have yet to get an equivalent signature on a permission slip to do the same with books. 

 

But the continued plagues of online disinformation and pandemic-forced closings or cutbacks of library services may breathe more life into a concept called Controlled Digital Lending.

“CDL” is not a format but a framework: After they scan one copy of printed book, libraries can loan one digital copy at a time, using digital-rights-management software to impede readers from duplicating it. …”

Budapest Open Access Initiative: 20 Years On

“Twenty years ago the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) released a statement of strategy and commitment to advocating for and realizing open access infrastructures across diverse institutions around the world.  In this episode we have the opportunity to hear from four individuals who have been part of that journey and work since the beginning: Melissa Hagemann, Senior Program Officer at Open Society Foundations; Peter Suber from Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication; Iryna Kuchma, Manager of the Open Access Program at Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL) and Dominique Babini, Open Science Advisor at CLACSO, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences. …”

Unlocking knowledge for social equity – Whooshkaa

“To celebrate international Open Access week 2021, UTS Library is taking a closer look at how the UTS community can prioritise unlocking knowledge through open education and open research to support social equity and inclusion.

UTS Library’s Scholarly Communications Manager, Scott Abbott, sat down with leading voice in the open access movement Peter Suber, who is currently the Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and Director of the Harvard Open Access Project.

 

In this interview, Peter sets the scene for global scholarly communications, dissects how Australia sits within the context of open infrastructure and explores some of the current risks and opportunities of the open access movement….”

Perspectives on the UNESCO Open Science Recommendation

“In our second season, we continue our mission of interrogating the politics of knowledge production, exchange and circulation – but with a specific focus on open science and open access. In this first episode we speak with Eleanor Haine, Program Officer at the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and Fernanda Beigel, Chair of the UNESCO Open Science Advisory Committee and Researcher at CONICET. Both have been actively involved in the drafting of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science – and from their different geographical, institutional and personal perspectives they share what open science means to them and what they and their colleagues have been fighting for….”

Everything Hertz: 139: Open science from a funder’s perspective (with Ashley Farley)

“We chat with Ashley Farley about her background as an academic librarian, the underrecognised importance of copyright in academic publishing, and her work as a Program Officer at the Gates Foundation

An academic librarian’s perpsective on the importance of open reseasch
The importance of copyright in research and what it means signing over your copyright
The PDF crisis!
What does a program officer at a grant funding organsiation do?
Why should funding organisations care about open science?
Why open access is more than just about acacemic papers, but extends to posters and presentations
Why can’t academics collectively decide to push back against the big publishers?
The difference between private funders vs. goverment funding agencies…”

Saving Alexandria with Project Gutenberg’s Dr. Greg Newby – The Poor Prole’s Almanac | Podcast on Spotify

“In this episode, we chat with Executive Director of Project Gutenberg, Dr. Greg Newby. We talk about the role of open access to knowledge and how copyright has played into a complicated mess that inhibits artistic development.”

Open Access Publishing: A Conversation with…

“What is Open Access Publishing and why is it important? Listen in as Raj Balkaran interviews Dominik A. Haas on his Fair Open Access Publishing in South Asian Studies (FOASAS) initiative which maintains a list of relevant publishers, journals, book series and other publication media. The list is available here. If you know of any other FOA publishers, journals etc. with an emphasis on Indological / South Asia-related research, or have feedback about the list, feel free to contact Dominik directly at dominik@haas.asia …”

ORION INSPIRING STORIES Ideas & examples

“This booklet is a compilation of nine Inspiring Stories which captures the “EUREKA moment” in the public engagement activities and embedding of Open Science and RRI performed during the ORION Open Science project. The stories showcase a variety of different engagement and Open Science aspects: citizen science, co-creation, public dialogues, public engagement, science communication and training.”

Impacts of COVID-19: open science — Frontiers Policy Labs

“In this episode Jean-Claude talks to Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC, about open science, its part in the pandemic, and what happens next.

Heather shares her thoughts about our readiness to deal with open science, in terms of physical and human infrastructure. She hopes we have reached a tipping point, where lessons learned from dealing with the pandemic will now be applied to all science, to deal with all global challenges – and that this will become a crucial agenda item for G7 and G20 policy conversations….”

Insights on the Replication Crisis in Scholarly Publishing from Ewoud Compeer, Immunologist, University of Oxford | Open Research Community

“In this podcast, Matthew Ismail talks to immunologist Ewoud Compeer of the University of Oxford about the reproducibility crisis and how Open Science and open access can help to enhance the reproducibility of research and restore public trust in science at a time when the pandemic has made trust in science very important….”

Open access science leads to more citations – The Science Show – ABC Radio National

Abstract:  The traditional method in releasing scientific results, still widely practiced, is to have a paper published in a peer reviewed journal, one usually accessible only by subscription. But that is changing. Some results are allowed to be seen by all. But it goes further. Some scientists release their results step by step and welcome feedback as experiments are underway. This is open access science. Kiera McNeice, Research Data Manager at Cambridge University Press says the publisher is pushing for more open access research while maintaining high standards of peer review. She says it leads to more citations, which for many scientists is a key measure of their work.

 

New Books Network | Open Access Publishing Explained: A Discussion…

“In this episode you’ll hear about: Ros Pyne’s path through higher education, how she found her way to her current job, her role at Bloomsbury Publishers, what Open Access [OA] is and is not, how OA can democratize knowledge, and what she’s hopeful about.

Our guest is: Ros Pyne, who is the Global Director of Research and Open Access at Bloomsbury Publishers. She has worked in academic publishing since 2007, initially as an editor, and for the last eight years in roles focusing on open access. She has a particular interest in bringing open access to long-form scholarship and to the humanities, and is the co-author of several reports on open access books. She holds a degree in English from the University of Cambridge, and an MA in early modern English literature from King’s College London….”

Open Access Publishing Explained: A Discussion With Ros Pyne New Books Network podcast

In this episode you’ll hear about: Ros Pyne’s path through higher education, how she found her way to her current job, her role at Bloomsbury Publishers, what Open Access [OA] is and is not, how OA can democratize knowledge, and what she’s hopeful about. Our guest is: Ros Pyne, who is the Global Director of Research and Open Access at Bloomsbury Publishers. She has worked in academic publishing since 2007, initially as an editor, and for the last eight years in roles focusing on open access. She has a particular interest in bringing open access to long-form scholarship and to the humanities, and is the co-author of several reports on open access books. She holds a degree in English from the University of Cambridge, and an MA in early modern English literature from King’s College London.

SSP’s Early Career Development Podcast: Episode 8, Open Access (Part 2) – The Scholarly Kitchen

“This eighth episode of SSP’s Early Career Development Podcast is the second in a two-part series on open access (OA) publishing (see Part 1 here). In this section, Meredith Adinolfi (Cell Press) and Ann Michael (DeltaThink) discuss some of the more complex aspects of the OA landscape, such as funder mandates, Plan S, and transformative agreements….”