Bibsam announcement – The Company of Biologists

“The Company of Biologists is delighted to announce a three-year Read & Publish Open Access agreement with the Bibsam Consortium which runs from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2024.

Corresponding authors at participating institutions in Sweden can publish an uncapped number of research articles immediately Open Access (OA) in our hybrid subscription journals (Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology) plus our fully Open Access journals (Disease Models & Mechanisms and Biology Open) without paying an article processing charge (APC).

Researchers at participating institutions also benefit from unlimited access to our hybrid subscription journals, including their full archives dating back to 1853….”

An Open Science Roadmap for Swedish Higher Education Institutions | Nordic Perspectives on Open Science

Abstract:  In the spring of 2021, a National Open Science Roadmap for Swedish Higher Education Institutions (HEI) was adopted by The Association of Swedish HEIs. The roadmap’s eight principles aim to guide the HEIs’ development of local structures and processes, speed up their concrete actions and encourage their collaboration in the shift to Open Science. The recommendations are concentrated on specific measures for open access to research data and research publications at HEIs. The primary target group for the roadmap is university management at Swedish HEIs. In the spring of 2022 the roadmap is to be supplemented by an action plan for Open Science.

 

A CHAPTER XXXVII (37st) OF FOCUS ON OPEN SCIENCE: BEYOND TRANSFORMATIVE AGREEMENTS

“Open Science describes the current transition in how research is undertaken, how the outputs are stored and disseminated, how researchers collaborate, how success is measured and how researchers are rewarded for more transparent and collaborative approaches. Open Science has the potential to transform the research landscape. This potential has been successfully tested – if only that – during pandemic times. 

Open Science started as a vision, aiming to address matters like research reproducibility and access to the results of publicly-funded research. The vision was generally welcome by academic and research institutions and benefited from a great advocacy movement. It’s high time now to build on practice and effective management. 
It is generally accepted in Europe that research should be as open as possible and as close as necessary. Finding the borderline between the two is one of the most important tasks for practitioners, whether they belong to funders, research organisations, their partners or researchers themselves.
Yet, this borderline is not sufficiently explored. Guidelines based on feedback and learning from practice should be created, rather sooner than later.
This innovative approach to research has further potential: to address existing inequalities and matters like inclusivity, ethics, better assessment or the missing links between science and society or to re-shape public-private partnerships.

This Open Science event is organized by the University of Stockholm, supported by UCL’s (University College London) Global Engagement Office and the UCL Office for Open Science, with technical support by Scientific Knowledge Services (SKS)….”

Springer Nature and Bibsam Consortium agree TA for Nature and the Nature Research journals | Corporate Affairs Homepage | Springer Nature

Springer Nature today announces a second Transformative Agreement (TA) to include its flagship title Nature. The agreement with the Bibsam Consortium in Sweden enables researchers affiliated with 10 initial institutions to publish their research articles accepted for publication in Nature and the Nature Research journals immediately open access (OA). This is at no cost to the individual researchers, as OA costs are covered by the consortium deal.

 

PLOS Expands Footprint in Sweden With a New Publishing Agreement With the Bibsam Consortium

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) today announced an agreement with the Bibsam Consortium to participate in PLOS’ three innovative publishing models. This two-year agreement provides researchers from affiliated institutions with unlimited publishing privileges in PLOS journals without incurring fees.

New European collaboration for open science training

Umeå University is one of four Swedish organisations involved in the new European collaboration Skills4EOSC. The collaboration is a large-scale project to expand and coordinate open science education in Europe. A majority of EU countries participate in the collaboration, which is led by the Italian consortium GARR. Sweden is represented by Umeå University, Chalmers, Karolinska Institutet and the Swedish National Data Service (SND). SND will also lead one of the six different working groups, or “work packages”, involved in the project.

Skenande kostnader för öppen tillgång – Biblioteksbladet

From Google’s English:  “In 2020, Swedish higher education institutions paid SEK 709 million for scientific literature and openly available articles. This is an increase of SEK 205 million from the previous year.

Almost three quarters of the increased expenditure, 145 million, can be explained by a newly signed agreement with Elsevier, which is one of the largest scientific publishers….

The big difference in expenses between 2019 and 2020 is due to the fact that we did not have an agreement with Elsevier for a year and a half, because we terminated it when we did not want to accept their terms. When we then entered into a new agreement after the termination, the cost came back, explains Wilhelm Widmark, chief librarian at Stockholm University and vice chairman of the Bibsam Consortium, which is the association of Swedish universities, colleges, authorities and research institutes that sign agreements with various publishers….

The goal is for a large part of that transformation to have taken place in 2024, when new agreements take over and the transformative agreements will hopefully be phased out.

– But many publishers probably want to permanent the transformative agreements. If they can continue to publish behind paywalls, they will make more money…”

Will there be any transformation or are we stuck with the transformative agreements? | UKSG

“In Sweden there is a government directive to reach 100% immediate Open Access during 2021. We won´t reach it this year – but we have come far as we today can count approximately 75% immediate Open Access among corresponding authors affiliated to a Swedish university. As early adoptors of transformative agreements we are quite experienced having negotiated them for roughly five years. This has been a bumpy road along which we have cancelled agreements, made mistakes, gained knowledge and also have had some success in our negotiations. Today, through the Bibsam consortia, there are 21 transformative agreements and a handful of agreements with pure Open Access publishers in place. Many Swedish universities also have local agreements with smaller publishers and societies. During these years we have seen a cultural shift from the authors – some were initially somewhat skeptical to Open Access but are now able to embrace that their research results should be openly published. Through our different agreements we are near the goal of 100% immediate Open Access – but to reach this far has led to a high increase of costs. Another subject of discussion is how we divide the costs within the consortia when we move from paying for reading to paying for publishing – and as we calculate the cost based on publishing the research-intensive institutions have seen a substantial rise.

The Swedish universities are committed to reach the goal but we don´t find the transformative agreements sustainable for the future. When Plan S came up it stated that they should be temporary, and the recommendations were for a short transitional period in order for the publishers to find new ways and models to provide Open Access. According to the funders that have signed Plan S they will cease funding publishing within such agreements on the 31st of December 2024. As an early adoptor we also believe that the transition period should be over at the end of 2024. …”

Frontiers | Ensuring Quality and Status: Peer Review Practices in Kriterium, A Portal for Quality-Marked Monographs and Edited Volumes in Swedish SSH | Research Metrics and Analytics

“Although established forms of peer review are often criticized for being slow, secretive, and even unfair, they are repeatedly mentioned by academics as the most important indicator of quality in scholarly publishing. In many countries, the peer review of books is a less codified practice than that of journal articles or conference papers, and the processes and actors involved are far from uniform. In Sweden, the review process of books has seldom been formalized. However, more formal peer review of books has been identified as a response to the increasing importance placed on streamlined peer-reviewed publishing of journal articles in English, which has been described as a direct challenge to more pluralistic publication patterns found particularly in the humanities. In this study, we focus on a novel approach to book review, Kriterium, where an independent portal maintained by academic institutions oversees the reviewing of academic books. The portal administers peer reviews, providing a mark of quality through a process which involves reviewers, an academic coordinator, and an editorial board. The paper studies how this process functions in practice by exploring materials concerning 24 scholarly books reviewed within Kriterium. Our analysis specifically targets tensions identified in the process of reviewing books with a focus on three main themes, namely the intended audience, the edited volume, and the novel role of the academic coordinator. Moreover, we find that the two main aims of the portal–quality enhancement (making research better) and certification (displaying that research is of high quality)–are recurrent in deliberations made in the peer review process. Consequently, we argue that reviewing procedures and criteria of quality are negotiated within a broader discussion where more traditional forms of publishing are challenged by new standards and evaluation practices….

Inclusion in Kriterium’s series also requires that the accepted book is parallel published open access on Kriterium’s website….

The purpose of launching the platform was also to enhance the quality of scholarly books more generally, to facilitate a more effective dissemination of knowledge, and to encourage open access to books….

Kriterium requires mandatory open access, as well as an assessment of manuscripts which does not involve estimates of sales and profit (which might be the case with the books’ publishers)….”

Open data by default, open source when needed in Norwegian and Swedish national museums | Open Source Observatory (OSOR)

Openess and digitalisation provide museums with new experiences in reaching a new audience. In Norway and Sweden, they are using and reusing open source in the daily production. Access to the museums’ APIs as open source are available by need from other cultural actors. Meanwhile open data are by default.

Transformation or consolidation – Evaluating transformative agreements at Uppsala University with an eye to the future | Zenodo

In the last few years, we have seen how publishing agreements have become increasingly common across Europe. At Uppsala University, the traditional subscription agreements now represent a minority of our agreements with the publishers and we suspect they will be phased out. Currently, our most common type of publishing agreements are the transformative agreements negotiated on the national level by the Bibsam consortia and offered to all Swedish higher education institutions. These transformative agreements currently cover most major international publishers and could be considered the new normal. Uppsala University is one of the largest and oldest universities in northern Europe. We are a truly multidisciplinary university, covering the humanities, social sciences, medicine, science and technology. This means that the university library should ideally be able to provide the same level of publishing support for theologists as well as geologists. With that in mind, the library was tasked to evaluate our portfolio of publishing agreements, with a special focus on the impact of the transformative ones. We wanted specifically to look at these new agreements in regards to 1) the impact for the individual researchers 2) economic aspects on various levels, and 3) the paradigm shift towards open science that is taking place in scholarly communication.

FOCUS ON OPEN SCIENCE: CHAPTER XXXII: STOCKHOLM

“Open Science describes the current transition in how research is undertaken, how the outputs are stored and disseminated, how researchers collaborate, how success is measured and how researchers are rewarded for more transparent and collaborative approaches. Open Science has the potential to transform the research landscape. This potential has been successfully tested – if only that – during pandemic times. 

Open Science started as a vision, aiming to address matters like research reproducibility and access to the results of publicly-funded research. The vision was generally welcome by academic and research institutions and benefited from a great advocacy movement. It’s high time now to build on practice and effective management. 

It is generally accepted in Europe that research should be as open as possible and as close as necessary. Finding the borderline between the two is one of the most important tasks for practitioners, whether they belong to funders, research organisations, their partners or researchers themselves.

Yet, this borderline is not sufficiently explored. Guidelines based on feedback and learning from practice should be created, rather sooner than later.

This innovative approach to research has further potential: to address existing inequalities and matters like inclusivity, ethics, better assessment or the missing links between science and society or to re-shape public-private partnerships.

Emphasizing research practices, we will discuss the role of research organisations to support this transition, both acting local and internationally.

The results of the workshops will be captured in a formal report. The report is intended to be used by all involved partners, to advance the implementation of Open Science in their communities and their own institutions….”

Focus on Open Science, Chapter XXXII: Stockholm

“Open Science describes the current transition in how research is undertaken, how the outputs are stored and disseminated, how researchers collaborate, how success is measured and how researchers are rewarded for more transparent and collaborative approaches. Open Science has the potential to transform the research landscape. This potential has been successfully tested – if only that – during pandemic times. 

Open Science started as a vision, aiming to address matters like research reproducibility and access to the results of publicly-funded research. The vision was generally welcome by academic and research institutions and benefited from a great advocacy movement. It’s high time now to build on practice and effective management. 

It is generally accepted in Europe that research should be as open as possible and as close as necessary. Finding the borderline between the two is one of the most important tasks for practitioners, whether they belong to funders, research organisations, their partners or researchers themselves.

Yet, this borderline is not sufficiently explored. Guidelines based on feedback and learning from practice should be created, rather sooner than later.

This innovative approach to research has further potential: to address existing inequalities and matters like inclusivity, ethics, better assessment or the missing links between science and society or to re-shape public-private partnerships.

 

Emphasizing research practices, we will discuss the role of research organisations to support this transition, both acting local and internationally.

The results of the workshops will be captured in a formal report. The report is intended to be used by all involved partners, to advance the implementation of Open Science in their communities and their own institutions.

 

The language of this event is English. 

The Workshop format offers both on-the-spot interactions and follow-up opportunities.

Please feel welcomed to participate to the sessions and to extend your professional network at the international level….”

Malmö University Press – projekt med mål att starta förlag | Medarbetarwebben

From Google’s English:  “On Monday, Rector Kerstin Tham decided on a project directive for her own publishing house at Malmö University. The project’s goal is to create a clear channel for publishing dissertations, monographs, anthologies and journals.

– There is a lot in place already to build on, says Malmö University’s library manager Sara Kjellberg. The important thing now is that Malmö University becomes a clearer publisher and takes responsibility in the development of scientific communication and what happens around open science….”

”Vi vill få ner kostnaderna för publiceringar” | Tidningen Curie

From Google’s English:  “One hundred percent open publishing, lower costs and a transparent pricing model. It is SUHF’s goal for the agreements between Swedish universities and scientific publishers that will replace the current ones that expire in 2024. A newly appointed inquiry will develop the strategy to get there….

We are afraid that the publishers want to permanently have the agreements we have today that we do not consider to be beneficial for the higher education institutions in the long term. If we get caught up in this, we are left to pay both to read and to publish articles and there will be hybrids, where some articles are open and others are not. We want a change in how publications are financed, says Wilhelm Widmark, who is chief librarian at Stockholm University Library and is part of the investigation group….”