SPARC Europe to facilitate high-level European OS policymaker group CoNOSC – SPARC Europe

“SPARC Europe is honoured to support the Council for National Open Science Coordination (CoNOSC) in their efforts to advance national European Open Science policies. The CoNOSC mission is to help countries create, update and cooordinate their national open science policies by sharing valuable insights from the network.

SPARC Europe will work with the CoNOSC group at least until the end of 2022. We will investigate the needs of today’s national Open Science (OS) policymakers and organise strategic OS policy meetings with high-level national OS Co-ordinators and ministry representatives to determine priorities for the coming year. We will facilitate discussion around important OS policy topics and showcase policy developments and outcomes to help resolve common challenges and stimulate synergies. We will also help build and expand the CoNOSC network….”

CoNOSC – Council for National Open Science Coordination

“On 21 October 2019, in Helsinki, France, the Netherlands and Finland invited representatives of the ERAC countries to discuss the creation of a network of open science coordination. The program of the day is included. Twenty-one countries were present, as well as the European Union. Participants agreed that it was necessary to create such a network to enable the coordination of national efforts in the field of open science.

The objectives and organizational principles of this network, which we have named ‘Council for National Open Science Coordination’ (CoNOSC), are specified in the attached Memorandum of Understanding. Here is the summary:

 

 

– CoNOSC helps to fill  in the gaps in national open science coordination.

– CoNOSC will provide a valuable insights through the dialogue with other international partners.

– CoNOSC membership is in principle open to all countries within the European Research Area….”

Council agrees on a negotiating mandate on the Data Governance Act

“Both the EP and Council texts contain amendments concerning the role of Open Access Common resources. In response to the initial DGA consultation, we submitted feedback to the Commission where we highlighted the fundamental role played by these resources in the overall data ecosystem. To safeguard this key function, it is important that Open Access Commons resources are not negatively affected by the DGA.

The Parliament’s text contains an addition in recital 37a stipulating that the provisions established by the DGA are without prejudice to the ability of non-profit organizations to make data and content available to the public under open licenses. This amendment would clearly signal that Open Access Common resources fall outside the scope of the DGA. As such, it would recognize their key role in today’s digital ecosystem.

The Council text includes a new definition of data intermediaries stipulating that only for-profit services fall into this category. If included in the final compromise, this addition would ensure that existing Open Access Resources, like Wikipedia or Europeana – which are generally recognized as not-for-profit – are not subject to the requirements that the DGA will impose on intermediaries.

Taken together, these two modifications would ensure that Open Access Commons resources are not subject to additional requirements that could endanger their modus operandi. To safeguard their position in the DGA and increase legal clarity, both Council’s and Parliament’s contributions therefore need to be included in the final text….”

Whitepaper: Proposal to leverage Article 17 to build a public repository of Public Domain and openly licensed works. · Open Future

“The German implementation includes a number of provisions that are specifically designed to reduce the risk of so-called overblocking: The unjustified blocking or removal of uploads subsequent to rightholder requests to prevent the availability of their works in accordance with Article 17(4) of the directive. These provisions include the requirement not to block “presumably legitimate” uploads and the requirement to keep disputed uploads available until the dispute is resolved.

In addition the German implementation law contains a specific provision aimed at preventing the unjustified blocking of works that are in the Public Domain or that have been licensed under open licenses….

To comply with this provision, OCSSPs operating in Germany will need to maintain an internal repository of works for which they have (1) received a blocking request and where (2) such blocking request has turned out to be abusive because the works are either in the Public Domain or where the use of the work is authorised under the terms of an open license…. 

Over time such repositories can be expected to grow and will likely start to contain a substantial number of entries relating to a wide variety of openly licensed and public domain works. This will result in the repositories obtaining value beyond the relatively narrow use case of preventing overblocking of openly licensed and PD works by OCSSPs: They will become repositories of freely reusable works that can help to unlock the societal value of these works…”

Knowledge Rights 21 – 21st Century Access to Culture, Learning and Research in Europe – IFLA

“Stichting IFLA Foundation is delighted to receive a €3m Arcadia grant to launch the new Knowledge Rights 21 (KR21) programme to promote access to knowledge for study, research and cultural life in Europe….

KR21 will be advocating for a 21st century copyright environment across Europe that is friendly to the modern delivery and use of education and research materials as well as the spread of culture and heritage in the digital age.

With a focus on evidence and capacity building, our goal is to achieve and implement reforms to copyright law and practice that enable knowledge institutions to provide unhindered access to copyright works for education and research purposes….”

Mark your calendar for the “From Here to EOSC” workshop on the 28th September – EOSC synergy

“The European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) is a hot topic in today’s science world, and national governments are taking more and more steps towards the concept of Open Science. This includes the Dutch government, that has started to monitor the progress and barriers concerning the Dutch data infrastructure and related facilities, which will be presented and discussed during the “From Here to EOSC” workshop organised by DANS in collaboration with the EOSC Synergy project….”

Register for the ORION Open Science Final Conference 27-28 September | ORION Open Science

“Welcome to the virtual final ORION Open Science Conference on 27-28 September to learn about and discuss achievements and lessons learned throughout the ORION project from 2017 to 2021. The conference is free of charge and open to anyone interested in Open Science and RRI practices, and its future national and international implications.

At the heart of the ORION Open Science EU-project is the ambition to open up the way we fund, organise and conduct life science research. During the project lifetime we have developed and tested a wide range of engagement methods, funding schemes, training materials and co-creation activities to engage the public in science. Now it is time to open up and share with you our achievements, tools and lessons learned. …”

Monitoring the open access policy of Horizon 2020

The key findings of this study indicate that the European Commission’s leadership in the Open Science policy has paid off. Uptake has steadily increased over the past four years, achieving an average success rate of 83% in Horizon 2020 for open access to scientific  publications, which places the European Commission at the forefront globally. What is also  apparent from the study is that monitoring – particularly with regard to the specific terms
and requirements of the policy – cannot be achieved by the reporting alone, or without the  European Commission collaborating closely with other funding agencies across Europe and beyond, to agree on and promote common standards and common elements of the underlying infrastructure. In particular, the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) should encompass all such components that are needed to foster a linked ecosystem in which information is exchanged on demand and eases the process for both researchers (who only
need to deposit once) and funders (who only need to record information once).

81% of Horizon 2020 papers were published in open access journals | Science|Business

“European Commission boasts of high level of open access publishing in Horizon 2020. But researchers complain getting processing fees approved is long winded and could result in them losing out on intellectual property rights….

A large majority of Horizon 2020 researchers complied with the requirement to deposit open access publications in repositories. However, only 39% of Horizon 2020 deposited datasets are findable, with the remainder not including reliable metadata needed to track them down. Only 32% of deposited datasets can be quickly accessed via a link in the metadata….

Since then, the EU has also mandated that all papers coming from projects funded through Horizon Europe, its €95.5 billion research programme, should be published in open access journals.

 

The study estimates the average cost in Horizon 2020 of publishing an open access article was around €2,200. Processing charges for articles in subscription journals in which some of the articles are open access and some behind a paywall, had a higher average cost of €2,600. Trouble is looming, with charges for such hybrid journals no longer being eligible for funding under Horizon Europe….”

Monitoring the open access policy of Horizon 2020 – Publications Office of the EU

The report examines, monitors and quantifies compliance with the open access requirements of Horizon 2020, for both publications and research data. With a steadily increase over the years and an average success rate of 83% open access to scientific publications, key findings indicate that the European Commission’s leadership in the Open Science policy has paid off. The study concludes with specific recommendations to improve the monitoring of compliance with the policy under Horizon Europe – which has a more stringent and comprehensive set of rights and obligations for Open Science. The data management plan and the datasets of the study are also available on data.europa.eu, the official portal for European data.

Agreements on Croatian Open Science Cloud Initiative Awarded to Institutions

“The agreements regulate resources and services necessary for the collection, processing, storage, dissemination and availability of research data.

This initiative is the result of years-long joint efforts of many stakeholders from the science and tertiary education in the open science movement, and the initiative was launched with the support of the Ministry of Science and the Croatian Science Foundation.

It creates preconditions for developing the Croatian open science cloud that will enable coordinated development of the country’s e-infrastructure.

 

The initiative will bring together relevant stakeholders in creating required preconditions for the implementation, realisation, and promotion of open science….”

cOAlition S statement on Open Access for academic books | Plan S

Academic books – defined here to include monographs, book chapters, edited collections, critical editions, and other long-form works – are an important mode of publication for scholars, especially in the Social Sciences and Humanities. Several studies have pointed out the benefits of Open Access (OA) book publishing. In 2019, Science Europe published five principles for OA to academic books and recommendations for six types of research stakeholders.  Springer Nature has recently shown that OA books receive 2.4 times more citations and are downloaded 10 times more than non-OA books.

Principle 7 of Plan S acknowledged that the timeline to achieve Open Access for books requires a separate and due process. The Implementation Guidance specified that “by the end of 2021, a statement on Plan S principles would be issued as they apply to monographs and book chapters, together with related implementation guidance”.

Since the Plan S principles for research articles were published, many cOAlition S funders have developed their own OA policies around academic books. (For an overview of cOAlition S funders with an existing OA books policy, see Annex A).  On critical elements, like embargoes and licences, policies of cOAlition S organisations have already converged. Most cOAlition S funders have adopted or advise CC licences, and embargoes range between 0 and 12 months.

cOAlition S recognizes that academic book publishing is very different from journal publishing. Our commitment is to make progress towards full open access for academic books as soon as possible, in the understanding that standards and funding models may need more time to develop. Rather than to decree a uniform policy on OA books, we have therefore decided to formulate a set of recommendations regarding academic books – in line with Plan S principles – that all cOAlition S organisations will seek to adopt within their own remits and jurisdictions.

Consultation on a ‘Declaration of Digital Principles’ | Europeana Pro

“In this context, the Europeana Foundation, Network Association and Aggregators’ Forum, collectively representing the Europeana Initiative, strongly support a rights-based, people-centred approach to the concept of digital citizenship and the development of principles that promote a more equitable and democratic digital environment in which

basic liberties and rights are protected online, 

sovereignty of data is protected,

public institutions are empowered to function in the public interest, and 

people are able to participate more fully in the creation, functioning and potential of their digital environment.  …

The Europeana Initiative recognises the relevance and importance of these principles through its work with the cultural heritage sector, and we believe that we have useful insights to share on them. However we believe that a fundamental principle is missing – that of universal access to cultural heritage online. …

Europeana’s focus is on supporting the cultural heritage sector in its digital transformation  because access to cultural heritage is vital to humankind – to our knowledge and understanding of who we are, where we’ve come from and what we can become. Democratising access to cultural heritage online, in ways that support inclusivity, innovation, creativity, education and knowledge sharing, is at the heart of Europeana’s purpose….

We work with Europe’s cultural heritage institutions to ensure that digital cultural heritage is shared in formats and of a quality which allows use and reuse by researchers and educators, creatives and innovators, and all citizens. Our work promotes the use of digital technology that makes cultural heritage online accessible, traceable and trustworthy, which in turn means people can explore it, use it, be inspired by it and learn from it with confidence. It contributes to an open, knowledgeable and creative society….”

 

Implementing EOSC together: read the report of the EOSC Symposium 2021 | Trust-ITServices

“The EOSC Symposium 2021 provided a key engagement opportunity for the EOSC community after the European Open Science Cloud finally entered its highly-anticipated implementation phase in 2021. Delivered online to just under 1,000 EOSC stakeholders from over 63 different countries, this was not only the largest EOSC Symposium yet, but it was also an essential opportunity for convergence and alignment on principles and priorities.

The EOSC Association will play an important role in this phase. With already over 210 member and observer organisations from across Europe, the Association represents a single voice for the advocacy and representation of the broader EOSC Stakeholder community in Europe, promoting alignment of EU research policy and priorities….”