FSCI 2022 Call for Course Proposals

“Please use this form to submit proposals to conduct a course at FSCI 2022, which will be held virtually July 25-29, 2022.

Please see last year’s abstracts <https://force11.org/fsci/post/course-list-with-abstracts-2/> to get a sense of our topics and how courses are typically structured. The FSCI Program Committee will deliberate on curriculum choices and work through March 2022 to finalize the selection of courses; registration will open in April.”

Upstream

“Today we are announcing Upstream. And if you’re reading this, you’re already a part of it!

Upstream is a community blogging platform designed for Open enthusiasts to discuss… you guessed it: all things Open. It’s a space for the whole community to voice opinions, discuss open approaches to scholarly communication, and showcase research….

Supported by FORCE11, this is a global and inclusive blog, bringing together diverse perspectives from all corners of scholarly communications from institutions to libraries to researchers to publishers to funders and policy-makers. Of course, there are lots of niche blogs out there, for example, at the university level or the stakeholder level, but our wider community has never had a central place to exchange in writing ideas about open research and all that it encompasses: open metadata; open code; open research data; open infrastructure; the culture of open; social justice and diversity in our community; open metrics; open citations; open access… You get the picture….”

 

Open and Inclusive Access to Research

“Open and Inclusive Access to Research is a four day virtual symposium, organised by Gimena Del Rio Riande, Daniel Paul O’Donnell, and Wouter Schallier. Primary funding was provided by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), with addition financial and in-kind support provided by Eclac, Force11, and the Sloan Foundation through the Reimagining Educational Practices for Open (REPO) project. The coapplicants and collaborators on the proposal were Gimena Del Rio Riande, CONICET; Juan Pablo Alperin, Simon Fraser University; Wouter Schallier, ECLAC; and Tanja Niemann, Université de Montréal.

The goal of this workshop is to bring experts and early career research professionals from Canada and Latin America together in a bilingual workshop environment that will enable them to exchange knowledge and expertise about Open Research Practices in a strategic yet very hands-on manner, with panels and prominent speakers from both continents. Researchers and policy makers in both Canada and Latin America have played leading roles internationally in the area of Open and Inclusive access to research, and particularly in Open Access, Open Data, and Open Science and Scholarship as a means to achieve this. The goal of this workshop is to bring those experts and early career researchers together to discuss areas of convergence and difference in a more systematic way….”

Recommendations for the handling of ethical concerns relating to the publication of research data | FORCE11

“The growth in data sharing over the last few years is an undeniably positive trend, providing the research community with ready access to valuable outputs and affording researchers further opportunities to extend the reach of their work. As more datasets are deposited and published, it is important — and necessary — to develop standards for the handling of possible ethical challenges that may arise in relation to published data: both to protect the researchers who contribute datasets and to secure trust by the scientific community in the value and reliability of public datasets.

While ethical standards have been developed for journal publications, this is a relatively new space for datasets and data publications. As the number of published datasets has increased, so has the amount and range of data-related ethics issues that data repositories and journals are encountering, and thus, the need for recommendations for a consistent and adequate handling of this type of cases has become more pressing. It is also important to recognize that while data repositories and journals may hold aligned integrity principles, the tools, processes and resources available at journals and data repositories differ. In the context of data publication, there may also be different research outputs that come into play (the dataset, the related journal article or preprint, perhaps different publications based on the same dataset). There is, therefore, a need to develop dedicated guidelines that account for these differences and nuances when handling ethical concerns related to a published dataset….”

Best Practices for Software Registries and Repositories | FORCE11

“Software is a fundamental element of the scientific process, and cataloguing scientific software is helpful to enable software discoverability. During the years 2019-2020, the Task Force on Best Practices for Software Registries of the FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation Working Group worked to create Nine Best Practices for Scientific Software Registries and Repositories . In this post, we explain why scientific software registries and repositories are important, why we wanted to create a list of best practices for such registries and repositories, the process we followed, what the best practices include, and what the next steps for this community are….”

FORCE 11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) | FORCE11

“Year after year, it’s attendees like yourself that bring life and success to this incredible institute. New or returning, the community is drawn together to develop their skills through focused courses, build and strengthen their network, and engage in important global discussions….”

FAIR Principles for Research Software (FAIR4RS Principles) | RDA

“Research software is a fundamental and vital part of research worldwide, yet there remain significant challenges to software productivity, quality, reproducibility, and sustainability. Improving the practice of scholarship is a common goal of the open science, open source software and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) communities, but improving the sharing of research software has not yet been a strong focus of the latter.

To improve the FAIRness of research software, the FAIR for Research Software (FAIR4RS) Working Group has sought to understand how to apply the FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship to research software, bringing together existing and new community efforts. Many of the FAIR Guiding Principles can be directly applied to research software by treating software and data as similar digital research objects. However, specific characteristics of software — such as its executability, composite nature, and continuous evolution and versioning — make it necessary to revise and extend the principles.

This document presents the first version of the FAIR Principles for Research Software (FAIR4RS Principles). It is an outcome of the FAIR for Research Software Working Group (FAIR4RS WG).

The FAIR for Research Software Working Group is jointly convened as an RDA Working Group, FORCE11 Working Group, and Research Software Alliance (ReSA) Task Force.”

Fireside Chat with FSCI

“Join Fireside Chat with FSCI [FORCE11 Scholarly Communications Institute] in The Reimagining Educational Practices for Open (REPO) Community Event Series!

Serah Rono, Director of Community Development and Engagement at The Carpentries, will chat with Martin J. Brennan, Scholarly Communication Education Librarian at UCLA, about his role in the FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI), and the impact of the pandemic upon FSCI and open science training more broadly….”

Reimagining Educational Practices for Open (REPO) | FORCE11

“At Jisc we’ve been committed to open research practices for years. Recent events have highlighted again exactly why all this matters. The ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis demonstrates our global connectedness and we’ve all seen that opening up research into the virus has enabled a global research and development effort to develop vaccines and treatments.

Our open research team works nationally and internationally to influence policy in favour of open scholarship. We partner with like-minded organisations around the world to develop services that support open approaches and to build the plumbing for the new processes, links, standards, workflows, policies, and incentives….”

Reimagining Educational Practices for Open (REPO) | FORCE11

“At Jisc we’ve been committed to open research practices for years. Recent events have highlighted again exactly why all this matters. The ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis demonstrates our global connectedness and we’ve all seen that opening up research into the virus has enabled a global research and development effort to develop vaccines and treatments.

Our open research team works nationally and internationally to influence policy in favour of open scholarship. We partner with like-minded organisations around the world to develop services that support open approaches and to build the plumbing for the new processes, links, standards, workflows, policies, and incentives….”

Open-source Community Call: The latest developments in open publishing and research communication | Events | eLife

“Please join us for the next Open-source Community Call, hosted in partnership by FORCE11, Dryad and eLife. These calls are an informal way to share and discuss efforts that promote open approaches to research communication, from dissemination of new results (as datasets, code or text) to discovery and evaluation. The focus is on emerging projects and significant updates for ongoing ones. Sign up and get the latest developments….”

Register Now for Open Source Community Call – Sept 2020 | FORCE11

“Join the Open Source Community Call co-hosted by FORCE11, Dryad, and eLife on September 29th, 3pm UTC (8am PDT, 11am EDT, 4pm BST)

Innovators share the latest updates and opportunities in the open-source space for research communication and publishing. Representatives from open source projects present in a ‘lightning talk’ format, 5 minutes or less, to share about projects and communities that are emerging or underway, so we can learn more about available open resources, where we can engage or contribute and consider where collaboration can contribute to the path forward….”

The Scholarly Commons: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  Maryann Martone, neuroscientist and Professor Emerita at the University of California, San Diego, is the former president of FORCE11, a community of scholars, librarians, archivists, publishers, and research funders seeking to change the way we share access to knowledge and research. Her presentation introduced the idea of the Scholarly Commons, from its conception at a FORCE meeting to its future potential. The Scholarly Commons is a new system for scholarly communication, which seeks to meet the needs of today’s researchers by reinventing the system from the ground up, committing to making its contents open, FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable), and citable.