What a difference a data repository makes: Six ways depositing data maximizes the impact of your science – The Official PLOS Blog

“1. You can’t lose data that’s in a public data repository…

2. Public data repositories support understanding, reanalysis and reuse…

3. Public data repositories facilitate discovery…

4. Public data repositories reflect the true value of data…

5. Public data demonstrates rigor…

6. Research with data in public data repositories attracts more citations…”

 

TRIPLE Conference 2021 “Empowering Discovery in Open Social Sciences and Humanities” November 22-24, 2021.

The goal of the conference is to create space for discussing the impact, benefits and challenges of discovery services for the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in the European research ecosystem.

We would like to bring together members of the Open Science and SSH communities (researchers, university and library staff) as well as other TRIPLE stakeholders such as publishers, science journalists, SMEs, public authorities and policy makers.

Topics include the nascent GoTriple platform – the innovative multilingual and multicultural discovery solution for the SSH –, crowdfunding in science, business models for Open Science and the role of SSH in the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC).

The Code4Lib Journal – Introducing SAGE: An Open-Source Solution for Customizable Discovery Across Collections

Abstract:  Digital libraries at research universities make use of a wide range of unique tools to enable the sharing of eclectic sets of texts, images, audio, video, and other digital objects. Presenting these assorted local treasures to the world can be a challenge, since text is often siloed with text, images with images, and so on, such that per type, there may be separate user experiences in a variety of unique discovery interfaces. One common tool that has been developed in recent years to potentially unite them all is the Apache Solr index. Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries has harnessed Solr for internal indexing for repositories like DSpace, Fedora, and Avalon. Impressed by frameworks like Blacklight at peer institutions, TAMU Libraries wrote an analogous set of tools in Java, and thus was born SAGE, the Solr AGgregation Engine, with two primary functions: 1) aggregating Solr indices or “cores,” from various local sources, and 2) presenting search facility to the user in a discovery interface.

 

Three lessons I learned from building Spark – a new (open access) discovery extension

“After over five years of work around scholarly communication, I have to say that this field never ceases to impress me. If you look away for a minute, you’ll be welcomed back by all sorts of developments, including shifting cultures, new funding models, emerging practices and new software solutions. This summer, I thought I would start a project to experiment with the tech side of scholarly communication – particularly, I wanted to create a browser extension focusing on the pain points of researchers.

My summer adventure started in June, when I sat in front of my screen with no idea how browser extensions even worked. Today, I am proud to say that Spark, the fruit of my coding experiments, has been approved in the Chrome Web Store. In this article, I share three lessons I learned during this fun yet challenging experience….”

Open Educational Resources: The Story of Change and Evolving Perceptions | Open Research Community

Perhaps no other issue involving OERs is more relevant and affecting more users, including faculty, than discoverability. All other potential issues aside, the sheer ability to keep up and filter through thousands of OERs is a skill in and of itself. OERs continue to grow at a staggering pace.

TRANSPARENT RANKING: All Repositories (August 2021) | Ranking Web of Repositories

During the last months, we realized the indexing of records of several open access repositories by Google Scholar is not as complete as previously without a clear reason. From the experience of a few cases, it looks that GS penalizes error in the metadata descriptions, so it is important to the affected repositories to check their level of indexing and to try to identify potential problems. Please, consider the following Indexing GS guidelines https://scholar.google.com/intl/en/scholar/inclusion.html https://www.or2015.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/or-2015-anurag-google-scholar.pdf and the following material: Exposing Repository Content to Google Scholar A few suggestions for improving the web visibility of the contents of your institutional OA repository “Altmetrics of the Open Access Institutional Repositories: A Webometrics Approach” As a service for the OA community we are providing five lists of repositories (all (institutional+subject), institutional, portals, data, and CRIS) with the raw numbers of records in GS for their web domains (site:xxx.yyy.zz excluding citations and patents) ranked by decreasing number of items as collected during the second week of AUGUST 2021. The list is still incomplete as we are still adding new repositories.

Sharing data to fuel discovery | VTx | Virginia Tech

“The University Libraries provides expertise in data planning, management, and publishing to fuel discovery and future research. Recently, the library launched a new version of its research data repository platform, powered by Figshare. 

Accessible from anywhere, Figshare is a cloud-based platform for storing, sharing, and citing research data. Virginia Tech researchers can upload their research data and receive a digital object identifier (DOI) for citing the data in publications and meet sponsor requirements for openly available data. Data uploaded to the Virginia Tech research data repository is discoverable in search engines, including Google Scholar and Google Dataset Search. Engagement and impact of the research can be tracked through views, downloads, citations, and Altmetric usage tracking.  …”

How PIDs & Preprints are facilitating the ownership of African scholarly content

“As part of the NISO.plus conference 2021 in the session “Quality and reliability of preprints, Ms Joy Owango presented the work AfricArXiv and TCC Africa are doing in facilitating ownership of African scholarly content using persistent identifiers.”

Finding and Using the Good Stuff: Open Educational Practices for Developing Open Educational Resources | Christian Hilchey

Finding and Using the Good Stuff : Open Educational Practices for Developing Open Educational Resources by Christian Hilchey

part of book:  Open Education and Second Language Learning and Teaching (Feb. 2021, De Gruyter)

Abstract: “Open educational resources (OER) are the concrete products of various open educational practices (OEP). As such, OER are typically more visible and better understood than OEP. Thus, the goal of this chapter is to make the hidden, tacit knowledge of OEP more apparent to L2 specialists who may wish to design their own OER. In particular, this chapter seeks to describe and demonstrate two OEP that are central to the development of OER: (1) how to find high-quality open content; and (2) how to adapt open content for the creation of user-generated materials. The chapter begins by demonstrating effective methods for finding rich and usable open media. This section summarizes the a ordances of different search engines and media repositories (e.g. Google, Flickr, Forvo, Pixabay, YouTube, Vimeo). Next, useful strategies for developing elements of a language curriculum based on openly licensed content are described. The chapter ends with a discussion of the pros and cons of technologies for the creation of OER content….

this chapter describes the various OEP that I learned through trial and error during the development of Reality Czech, an OER developed at the University of Texas at Austin under the auspices of the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL)….”

 

DOAB partners with SciELO to further enhance publisher discoverability and simplify workflows | Directory of Open Access Books

“DOAB, a central discovery service for open access books, is pleased to introduce a new partnership with SciELO. Through this new initiative, SciELO Books becomes part of a group of several trusted platforms to enhance the discoverability of open access books and create a more seamless process for publishers to list their open access books in DOAB….”