ARIADNE PLUS – Ariadne infrastructure

“The ARIADNEplus project is the extension of the previous ARIADNE Integrating Activity, which successfully integrated archaeological data infrastructures in Europe, indexing in its registry about 2.000.000 datasets (ARIADNE portal). ARIADNEplus will build on the ARIADNE results, extending and supporting the research community that the previous project created and further developing the relationships with key stakeholders such as the most important European archaeological associations, researchers, heritage professionals, national heritage agencies and so on. The new enlarged partnership of ARIADNEplus covers all of Europe. It now includes leaders in different archaeological domains like palaeoanthropology, bioarchaeology and environmental archaeology as well as other sectors of archaeological sciences, including all periods of human presence from the appearance of hominids to present times. Transnational Activities together with the planned training will further reinforce the presence of ARIADNEplus as a key actor.

The ARIADNEplus data infrastructure will be embedded in a cloud that will offer the availability of Virtual Research Environments where data-based archaeological research may be carried out. The project will furthermore develop a Linked Data approach to data discovery, making available to users innovative services, such as visualization, annotation, text mining and geo-temporal data management. Innovative pilots will be developed to test and demonstrate the innovation potential of the ARIADNEplus approach.

ARIADNEplus is funded by the European Commission under the H2020 Programme, contract no. H2020-INFRAIA-2018-1-823914….”

Model(s) of the future? Overlay journals as an overlooked and emerging trend in scholarly communication | The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

Abstract: Overlay journals, a potentially overlooked model of scholarly communication, have seen a resurgence due to the increasing number of preprint repositories and preprints on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related topics. Overlay journals at various stages of maturity were examined for unique characteristics, including whether the authors submitted their article to the journal, whether the peer reviews of the article were published by the overlay journal, and whether the overlay journals took advantage of opportunities for increased discovery. As librarians and researchers seek new, futuristic models for publishing, overlay journals are emerging as an important contribution to scholarly communication.

 

An iterative and interdisciplinary categorisation process towards FAIRer digital resources for sensitive life-sciences data | Scientific Reports

Abstract:  For life science infrastructures, sensitive data generate an additional layer of complexity. Cross-domain categorisation and discovery of digital resources related to sensitive data presents major interoperability challenges. To support this FAIRification process, a toolbox demonstrator aiming at support for discovery of digital objects related to sensitive data (e.g., regulations, guidelines, best practice, tools) has been developed. The toolbox is based upon a categorisation system developed and harmonised across a cluster of 6 life science research infrastructures. Three different versions were built, tested by subsequent pilot studies, finally leading to a system with 7 main categories (sensitive data type, resource type, research field, data type, stage in data sharing life cycle, geographical scope, specific topics). 109 resources attached with the tags in pilot study 3 were used as the initial content for the toolbox demonstrator, a software tool allowing searching of digital objects linked to sensitive data with filtering based upon the categorisation system. Important next steps are a broad evaluation of the usability and user-friendliness of the toolbox, extension to more resources, broader adoption by different life-science communities, and a long-term vision for maintenance and sustainability.

 

Open Science Conference 2023 | United Nations

“Since 2019, when the Dag Hammarskjöld Library held the 1st Open Science Conference at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, the global open movement has been significantly enriched with new national and international policies and frameworks as well as daring and visionary initiatives, both private and public.

At the 2nd Global Open Science Conference, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change, in July 2021 more than a year into the pandemic that had upturned daily lives globally, participants from around the world engaged in a public dialogue focusing on what open science has learned from COVID-19 and how this can be applied into actions addressing the global climate crisis, at the interface of science, technology, policy and research. The Conference took stock of actions undertaken nationally and internationally, collected lessons learned and identified directions for the way forward. Open science was recognized as the keystone to assert everyone’s right “to share in scientific advancement and its benefits”. Speakers and audience asked for the complete overhaul of outdated scientific processes, publishing and research assessment practices that oppose open science principles, proposed global curation infrastructures for the record of science and platform-agnostic discovery services, as well as enhanced bibliodiversity, inclusivity, and multilingualism….”

When XML Marks the Spot: Machine-readable journal articles for discovery and preservation

“If you work with a campus-based journal program and you’re looking to expand the readership and reputation of the articles you publish, adding them to relevant archives and indexes (A&Is) presents a treasure trove of opportunities. A&Is serve as valuable content distribution networks, and inclusion in selective ones is a signal of research quality. You may have heard about XML, one of the primary machine-readable formats academic databases use to ingest content, and wonder if that’s something you need to reach your archiving and indexing goals.

This free webinar, co-hosted by Scholastica, UOregon Libraries, and the GWU Masters in Publishing program, will offer a crash course in the benefits of XML production and use cases, including:

What XML is and the different types required or preferred by academic indexes and archives (with an overview of JATS)
How producing metadata and/or full-text articles in XML can unlock discovery and archiving opportunities with examples
Additional benefits of XML for journal accessibility as well as publishing program and professional development
When XML is needed and when it may not be the best use of journal resources
Ways you can produce XML, including an overview of Scholastica’s production service…”

TRIPLE Conference 2023: Improving Discovery and Collaboration in Open Science – Sciencesconf.org

“Since 2019 the TRIPLE project has been developing the multilingual discovery platform GoTriple, aiming to facilitate interdisciplinary research and foster collaboration. The platform provides a central access point for users to explore, find, access and reuse Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) materials at European scale (data and publications, researcher’s profiles, projects). Users can find appropriate resources to support their own research and develop collaborative and interdisciplinary projects: different innovative tools are plugged to the platform to enhance the overall user experience. Data are automatically and continuously harvested with the active support of a vocabulary containing 11 languages for both resources and classification capabilities. GoTriple is part of the EOSC catalogue powered by the OPERAS Research Infrastructure.

GoTriple is dedicated to addressing pressing challenges that Social Sciences and Humanities face: data and research results are scattered along the lines of various disciplines, languages, catalogues and repositories, and collaboration – among researchers, enterprises, and citizens alike – is hindered. The service and its features are intended to soften and, eventually, overcome the borders that separate disciplines and researchers from each other. 

By providing a multilingual vocabulary, the creation of an open source API to enrich data and thereby offering an interdisciplinary, multilingual discovery service, GoTriple is intended to work as an intersection between various stakeholders in academia and society, enhance the low visibility of SSH results and improve their impact….”

Preprints als Informationsquelle besser nutzbar machen – TH Köln

From Google’s English:  “In the project PIXLS – Preprint Information eXtraction for Life Sciences, TH Köln and ZB MED will develop an application over the next three years that automatically opens up the preprint server. This enables the research community to make better use of current information that was published on preprint servers – and therefore hardly appears in classic detection and search systems.

The German Research Foundation (DFG) is funding the project as part of the e-Research Technologies framework programme.”

European Commission provides funding to improve Open Access publishing landscape

“From January 2023, the University of Coimbra will be involved in another Open Science project: the CRAFT-OA project (“Creating a Robust Accessible Federated Technology for Open Access”) involves 23 partners in 14 European countries and will last for 36 months. The project is funded under the Horizon Europe framework programme, aiming to evolve and strengthen the institutional publishing landscape of Diamond Open Access (Diamond OA): no fees for authors or readers.

By offering tangible services and tools for the entire journal publishing lifecycle, CRAFT-OA will empower local and regional platforms and service providers to extend, professionalise and achieve greater interoperability with other scientific information systems for content and platforms. These developments will help researchers and publishers involved in publishing.

The project focuses on four action strands to improve the Diamond OA model:

(1) Providing technical improvements for journal platforms and journal software.

(2) Building communities of practice to promote overall infrastructure improvement

(3) Increase the visibility, discoverability and recognition of Diamond OA publishing

(4) Integrate Diamond OA publishing with the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and other large-scale data aggregators….”

Befragung: Rahmenbedingungen und Kriterien bei der Veröffentlichung einer wissenschaftlichen Publikation – OPTIMETA

From Google’s English:  “Help us to find out more about the framework and criteria for publishing a scientific publication!

It is our concern to strengthen the Open Access publication landscape by creating the opportunity, especially for smaller Open Access journals, to increase the visibility of their articles and thus their authors through easily implementable technical innovations. We are trying to implement this in the BMBF project OPTIMETA.

In this context, we are interested in the perspective of scientists. We want to find out what attitudes, habits and expectations researchers have in relation to scientific publishing. We are currently conducting a survey and ask for your support. We would be very pleased if you, as a scientist, could take part in the survey and/or forward the survey link to potentially interested researchers.

Participation in the survey is possible until January 20th and will take about 15 to 20 minutes.”

DFG – Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft – Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft schafft Grundlagen für die Veröffentlichung von Abschlussberichten

From Google’s English:  “Recipients of grants from the German Research Foundation (DFG) are obliged to report on their work and the results obtained after completing their project. The reports serve to account for the use of public funds and provide information about the success of the funding and for the further development of funding programs….

In order to broaden the scientific information base and to contribute to the necessary culture change in scientific publishing, the DFG Executive Board has decided to make final reports of DFG projects easier to access and to make the scientific results section from project reports publicly accessible….

In future, grant recipients will be asked to make part of the final report intended for publication accessible in suitable repositories. The publication is supported by corresponding templates, which specify a structuring into a part intended for publication and a non-public part. In addition, the DFG provides a non-binding white list that identifies at least one possible place of publication for each scientific area according to tested quality standards….

For most applications approved after January 1, 2023, the templates provided are mandatory when preparing the final report. Projects that were approved at an earlier point in time can also use the templates. From summer 2023 it will be possible to send the link to the repository to the DFG via the elan application portal and link the reports in GEPRIS….”

NIH Preprint Pilot Accelerates and Expands Discovery of Research Results

“The NIH Preprint Pilot has accelerated and expanded broad discovery of NIH-funded research results relating to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19. This finding comes from a new preprint authored by staff at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and made available in bioRxiv. A project of NLM, the NIH Preprint Pilot was launched to explore new approaches to increase the discoverability of NIH-supported research results and gain a better understanding of perceptions and practices regarding preprints.

Preprints are complete and public drafts of scientific articles that have not yet been peer reviewed. Their use in communicating the results of biomedical research surged during the COVID-19 pandemic. The NIH Preprint Pilot builds on the role of PubMed Central (PMC) as a repository for peer-reviewed articles supported by NIH under the NIH Public Access Policy as well as NIH’s encouragement of investigators to use interim products of research, including preprints, to speed the dissemination of research and enhance the rigor of their work.

As part of NLM’s response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, Phase 1 of the NIH Preprint Pilot added to PMC more than 3,300 preprint records reporting on the results of NIH-funded research on the SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19 and made citations discoverable in PubMed. These preprints have been viewed 4 million times and 3 million times in PMC and PubMed, respectively. The records are clearly labeled as preprints and can be included or excluded from search results in both resources.

Two years after the launch of the pilot, NLM analyzed the results of Phase 1 and found that inclusion of preprints facilitates discovery of NIH-supported research by making content available in full-text searchable formats, accelerating discoverability in NLM literature databases, and expanding the NIH research results made searchable. The findings suggest that the availability of preprints did not decrease users’ trust of NLM and its literature resources, with some reporting increased trust due to greater transparency offered into the research process.

The success of the pilot has encouraged NLM to extend the pilot in a second phase to launch in early 2023 that will encompass all preprints reporting on NIH-funded research. For preprints that are authored by NIH-funded researchers and voluntarily posted to eligible preprint servers on or after January 1, 2023, NLM will automatically include the full text of the preprint (as license terms allow) and associated citation information available in PMC and PubMed, respectively….”

Phase 1 of the NIH Preprint Pilot: Testing the viability of making preprints discoverable in PubMed Central and PubMed | bioRxiv

Abstract:  Introduction The National Library of Medicine (NLM) launched a pilot in June 2020 to 1) explore the feasibility and utility of adding preprints to PubMed Central (PMC) and making them discoverable in PubMed and 2) to support accelerated discoverability of NIH-supported research without compromising user trust in NLM’s widely used literature services.

Methods The first phase of the Pilot focused on archiving preprints reporting NIH-supported SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19 research. To launch Phase 1, NLM identified eligible preprint servers and developed processes for identifying NIH-supported preprints within scope in these servers. Processes were also developed for the ingest and conversion of preprints in PMC and to send corresponding records to PubMed. User interfaces were modified for display of preprint records. NLM collected data on the preprints ingested and discovery of preprint records in PMC and PubMed and engaged users through focus groups and a survey to obtain direct feedback on the Pilot and perceptions of preprints.

Results Between June 2020 and June 2022, NLM added more than 3,300 preprint records to PMC and PubMed, which were viewed 4 million times and 3 million times, respectively. Nearly a quarter of preprints in the Pilot were not associated with a peer-reviewed published journal article. User feedback revealed that the inclusion of preprints did not have a notable impact on trust in PMC or PubMed.

Discussion NIH-supported preprints can be identified and added to PMC and PubMed without disrupting existing operations processes. Additionally, inclusion of preprints in PMC and PubMed accelerates discovery of NIH research without reducing trust in NLM literature services. Phase 1 of the Pilot provided a useful testbed for studying NIH investigator preprint posting practices, as well as knowledge gaps among user groups, during the COVID-19 public health emergency, an unusual time with heightened interest in immediate access to research results.

“Creating a Robust Accessible Federated Technology for Open Access” (CRAFT-OA): European Commission grants substantial funding to improve institutional publishing for science

CRAFT-OA launch

The project “Creating a Robust Accessible Federated Technology for Open Access” (CRAFT-OA), carried out by 23 experienced partners from 14 European countries, coordinated by the University of Göttingen, Germany will start in January 2023 and run for 36 months. Funded within the Horizon Europe Framework Programme (HORIZON Europe), the project aims to equally evolve and strengthen the Diamond Open Access (Diamond OA, no fees towards authors or readers) institutional publishing landscape. By offering tangible services and tools for the entire life cycle of journal publishing CRAFT OA empowers local and regional platforms and service providers to upscale, professionalise and reach stronger interoperability with other scientific information systems for content and platforms. These developments will help researchers and editors involved in publishing.

The project focuses on four strands of action to improve the  Diamond OA model: (1) Provide technical improvements for journal platforms and journal software (2) Build communities of practice to foster overall infrastructure improvement (3) Increase visibility, discoverability and recognition for Diamond OA publishing (4) Integrate Diamond OA publishing with the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and other large-scale data aggregators. Consortium partners in CRAFT-OA bring their long-standing engagement in institutional publishing and infrastructure and are committed to sustaining and developing capacities in the field. CRAFT-OA will deliver technical tools, training events, training materials, information, and services for the Diamond OA institutional publishing environment. It will foster communities of practice with the capacity to sustain the project improvements over time.

Margo Bargheer, CRAFT-OA Coordinator, University of Göttingen:

There are countless engaged open access journals out there, making a point to offer Diamond Open Access options to their communities. With our project, they will benefit from shared developments and shared services, but most of all from shared knowledge around professional institutional publishing and stronger networks to reach resilience within their own operation.

EU-Projects support scholarly publishing

CRAFT-OA is linked with other European projects supporting Diamond Open Access, especially the 3-years DIAMAS project (Developing Institutional Open Access Publishing Models to Advance Scholarly Communication). As CRAFT-OA mainly supports Diamond Open Access publishing by providing a technology update, the DIAMAS project supports Diamond Open Access on a non-technical level by building up a capacity centre and a community. The PALOMERA project (Policy Alignment of Open Access Monographs in the European Research Area) investigates institutional scholarly communication as well. Still, it concentrates on contrary to journals on books and especially policies for books. It launches in January 2023 and will run for two years.

Consortium and skills

CRAFT-OA’s 23 consortium partners from 14 European countries are all engaged in institutional publishing and infrastructure, and committed to sustaining and developing capacities in the field. A wide variety of skills and expertise is represented via the consortium partners participating in the project: 

For more information please contact the coordinator Margo Bargheer, bargheer[a]sub.uni-goettingen.de


EU Funding